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November 15, 2012

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2011
Humboldt County, Iowa Thursday, November 15, 2012 $1.25
Area churches ....................4B
Classified
advertising .....................9A
Community calendar ........4B
Courthouse news .............. 4A
Obituaries ............................ 8A
Sports ...................................1B
2 Sections Official newspaper of Humboldt County
Vol. 154 No. 26 USPS No. 254060
Blacktop Service Company of Humboldt was
applying asphalt to 1
st
Avenue North on Friday,
just north of the NEW Cooperative elevator. The
project was part of the city of Humboldt’s 2012
street improvement program. Humboldt Inde-
pendent photo.
The firing squad fired off three shots in memory of fallen
comrades during the Veteran’s Day ceremony held Sunday
at the VFW in Dakota City. Humboldt Independent photo.
Hear financial
updates
By Phil Monson
Over the last 10 years, the
LuVerne and Corwith-Wesley
school districts have worked
hard to reduce spending to
maintain a viable school dis-
trict.
But bigger decisions appear
to be just around the corner for
both boards as they try to deal
with declining enrollment and
the corresponding reduction in
funding.
During a regular meeting
of the LuVerne board on Nov.
7, in which members of the
Corwith-Wesley board were
also in attendance, School Su-
perintendent Tom Fey updated
the boards on their financial
situations.
Budgets for the 2011-2012
school year have been filed
with the Iowa Department of
Education. Figures show the
LuVerne district had a positive
unspent balance of roughly
$55,000 on June 30, 2012. The
Corwith-Wesley district had
a negative unspent balance of
$124,666.
State officials require dis-
tricts to maintain an unspent
balance of 10-15 percent of
their total budget, which al-
lows districts to continue to
pay salaries and bills during
the months of July, August and
September when little tax rev-
enue is coming in.
Fey says projections for the
2012-13 and 2013-14 school
years don’t look better and
school officials will have to
make some hard decisions.
“We had a nice discussion
about the viability of the dis-
tricts and the future of the dis-
tricts, from a financial sense
only,” Fey told the Indepen-
dent afterwards.
“Corwith-Wesley went
negative unspent balance in
fiscal year 2011-2012 and
LuVerne was positive. But
the year before LuVerne had
been negative (-$30,000),”
Fey said. “The only saving
graces we would have: 1) if
our enrollment drastically in-
creased, which it’s not going
to and we know that. We’re
on a downward slide. 2) If the
state somehow throws a lot of
money at us, which we know
they are not going to do. 3) Or
if our expenditures decrease
significantly.”
“Quite frankly, we can’t cut
any more. We are offering a
good, solid program. Every-
thing the state mandates, we
offer. Any teachers we would
cut, we would find ourselves
not offering what we are re-
quired to offer,” Fey said.
“There is really no where to
cut the amount of money we
would need to cut to be able
to continue long-term into the
future,” Fey said.
“I gave the boards some
things to chew on and we will
meet again here shortly and
talk about those things,” Fey
said. “I wanted to plant some
things into their heads so they
can start giving those things
some thoughts.”
“I’m very proud of both
boards. They understand
where they are at and they un-
derstand everybody our size
around us has changed and
we’re about the last surviv-
ing soul of our size,” Fey said.
“We had a really good discus-
sion of our current financial
situation and what we see in
the future.”
Fey shared options available
for the two boards to consider.
“The only options allowed
to a school district are whole-
grade share with somebody
else, dissolve the districts or
re-organization with a neigh-
bor. Those are the only three
options,” Fey said.
“I want to make it clear that
this is not going to happen to-
morrow. This is a few years
away at the least because there
are timelines that have to be
met and decisions to be made.
It will take a few years. But it’s
time the boards look at all the
financials and look at what is
possible to continue operating
in some way shape or form
to best serve the students we
have,” Fey said.
Fey, who has served both
districts on a part-time basis
over the past 12 months, says
he’ll continue to work with
school-wide principal James
Rotert to provide information
on options available.
“I’m going to get the board
some information on whole
grade sharing. The state has a
restructuring manual that the
board will have to read clearly
so they know everything that’s
in there,” Fey said. “The next
step is becoming more in-
formed of what the possibili-
ties are.”
Fey, mindful of cutting
measures the districts have un-
dertaken over the last several
years, says there is no more
room for cuts to ensure long-
term viability in offering a
K-12 program.
“We’d like to be able to
sit down and try and come
up with more cuts for cost-
savings, but there are no more
cuts that we can make,” Fey
said. “We’ve got one bus route
in Corwith. We have one cook.
One custodian. One secretary.
We’ve got a couple of multi-
age classrooms where six or
eight first graders and nine or
10 kindergarteners are in the
same room so we can have one
teacher instead of two.”
“Our high school teachers
are teaching full loads, but
teacher-required. If we did cut
something, we would not be
meeting state mandates,” Fey
said.
The 2012 Humboldt-Dakota City Chamber of Com-
merce Lighted Christmas Parade will be on Saturday,
Nov. 17, at 5 p.m.
The parade route will begin by Northwest Bank, con-
tinuing through Sumner Avenue into Dakota City, Main
Street. It will end at the VFW in Dakota City. A free will
soup supper with Santa will conclude the evening.
By Kent Thompson
It was election day in Hum-
boldt County Nov. 6, but not
all of the politicians were sit-
ting around waiting for the re-
turns.
Iowa Lt. Gov. Kim Reyn-
olds was in north central Iowa,
continuing a series of business
and industry visits around the
state.
Last Tuesday’s stops were
at Hagie Manufacturing in
Clarion and Liguria Foods in
Humboldt.
Liguria is a producer of
specialty meat toppings, pri-
marily pepperoni.
Liguria Foods management
and local Humboldt County
Development Association offi-
cials took the lieutenant gover-
nor on a brief tour of the plant
followed by a short question
and answer session.
Reynolds said Gov. Terry
Branstad’s administration has
been successful in bringing
stability back to the state. She
said the administration has es-
tablished a budget surplus and
is working toward comprehen-
sive tax reform for residential,
commercial and industrial
classes.
“The corporate tax struc-
ture in the state is not competi-
tive. It needs to be revised,” Lt.
Gov. Reynolds said.
“If we can bring it down it
will expand and improve the
business climate for industries
like Liguria Foods.”
Reynolds said the Healthi-
est State Initiative is a way to
not only improve the overall
health of Iowans, but to reduce
health insurance rates and
decrease overall health care
costs.
“That’s why the governor
and I agreed to pay 20 percent
of our health insurance costs.
We want to empower Iowans
to take ownership of their own
health and don’t believe tax-
payers should be on the hook
for the entire cost of state-
employee health insurance,”
Reynolds said.
Another big push is educa-
tion reform. Reynolds is co-
chair of the governor’s STEM
(Science, Technology, Engi-
neering and Mathematics) ex-
ecutive committee.
Reynolds said there are a
lot of opportunities for two-
A new and improved web-
site for Humboldt Newspapers
has been launched, giving
readers the chance to subscribe
to e-editions. The e-editions
are an exact replica of the print
edition. People can access the
site at www.humboldtnews.
com.
The new website also en-
ables people to subscribe or re-
new their subscriptions to the
Humboldt Independent online
with a credit card. Print sub-
scribers automatically qualify
for the e-edition of the news-
paper free of charge. Current
print subscribers can contact
the Humboldt Newspapers of-
Lieutenant governor visits Liguria Foods
year degrees in specific STEM
areas that can aid industries
like Liguria Foods.
She asked about the labor
availability pool in the area
and if Liguria has difficulties
in finding workers.
“Unemployment is about
4 percent, so there has been
some issues in finding factory
labor. There is some increas-
ing competition with the new
plants opening in Fort Dodge,”
Liguria Chief Financial Offi-
cer (CFO) Paul Simkus said.
“We are a United Food and
Commercial Workers Inter-
national Union plant and we
have a good working relation-
ship with the union and look
forward to maintaining that,”
Liguria Chief Executive Offi-
cer (CEO) and President Jehan
Saulnier told the lieutenant
governor.
Liguria Vice President
Gary Piearson said the com-
pany has increased its starting
minimum wage to $10.50 per
hour with sizable increases af-
ter 60 days and five months.
“People can be making $14
per hour within a few months,”
Piearson said.
“Business has been good
and revenue for specialty food
products has been growing,”
Saulnier said.
“Prices for our raw materi-
als (pork trimmings) has been
volatile, as has any animal
protein product. That’s largely
been driven by the corn price
and that has been driven by
ethanol,” the CEO said.
So far, any inflationary
price trends have not been met
with resistance from Liguria’s
customers, largely indepen-
dent pizza shop owners, who
really favor the traditional red-
wood smoked pepperoni Ligu-
ria produces.
“We just focus on our core
product and satisfying our cus-
tomers. Fortunately, a lot of
people eat a lot of pizza and
pepperoni is the number one
topping sold on pizza,” Saul-
nier said.
“I read where 96 to 97 per-
cent of the people in the coun-
try ate pizza within the last
year. I’m trying to figure out
who the other 3-4 percent are,”
the CEO joked.
“We have 1.8 million
pounds of pepperoni currently
hanging in the plant,” Piearson
proudly states.
“We slice about 600,000
pounds per week,” Saulnier
said.
“We focus on providing a
better product and consistently
high service and that seems to
work,” Saulnier said.
Liguria completed an $8
million plant expansion two
GOP takes
Humboldt County
Christianson re-elected
to Supervisors
By Kent Thompson
Election night 2012 went pretty much as expected in Hum-
boldt County, with few contested races and few surprises.
It was a good night for Republicans as Mitt Romney and
Steve King outpolled their Democratic challengers for president
and U.S. representative.
Romney defeated President Barack Obama in Humboldt
County, 3,099 to 1,967. He won by a similar percentage in Kos-
suth County. Statewide, Obama had the edge, outpolling Rom-
ney by nearly 85,000 votes, putting Iowa’s six electoral votes in
See Liguria, 2A See Election Results, 10A
See Future, 3A
See Website, 3A
2A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
years ago and now has 143
employees — a mixture of
hourly wage workers and man-
agement and office positions.
“We haven’t been shy in
reinvesting in the company,”
Saulnier said.
“We’ll be putting in about
$2 million in capital improve-
ments this year, so it’s pretty
substantial,” Piearson added.
A USDA inspector exam-
ines the company’s equipment
and processes daily to make
sure Liguria is complying with
all federal food safety require-
ments.
“Food safety emphasis
has probably been the biggest
change during my 25 years in
the business,” Saulnier said.
Reynolds concluded the
visit by thanking the Liguria
executives for their commit-
ment to the Humboldt commu-
nity and the state.
“I want to thank you for
your investment and expan-
sion.
“It’s businesses like your-
selves that keeps Iowa grow-
ing,” the lieutenant governor
remarked.
Liguria from front page
Iowa Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds and her staff visited Liguria Foods in Humboldt last
week, part of a number of business fact-finding tours around the state the lieutenant
governor has been conducting. Pictured from l to r: Jim Vermeer, Humboldt County
Development Association vice president, Gary Piearson, Liguria Foods vice presi-
dent, Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds, Jehan Saulnier, president and CEO of Liguria Foods
and Alissa Reinholdt, Humboldt County Economic Development director. Humboldt
Independent photo.
By Carolyn Ford
I would like to welcome all
of you here today for attend-
ing this very special occasion
to honor our service members
past and present and to re-
member their sacrifices they
have made and the courage it
takes to defend honor, duty,
and country.
I appreciate this oppor-
tunity to speak to all of you
about something that is very
near and dear to my heart and
that is patriotism and love of
country. We are here today to
honor our heroes, to remember
their achievements, and to say
“Thank You” for their sacri-
fices. We are gathered here to-
day in the midst of patriots and
the family and friends of those
who have nobly served. I hope
that with this opportunity that I
have been given, you will walk
away from this public gather-
ing with renewed respect and
love for all military serving in
all capacities in all parts of the
world.
For nearly 250 years, men
and women have underwrit-
ten our freedom by their duty,
honor, and selfless service.
Through these nearly 250
years we have experienced
what the author Andy Andrews
calls “The Butterfly Effect.”
In this book Edward Lorena
presents a hypothesis to New
York Academy of Science. His
theory, stated simply, was this:
“A butterfly could flap its
wings and set molecules of air
in motion, which would move
other molecules of air, in turn
moving more molecules of air
– eventually capable of start-
ing a hurricane on the other
side of the planet.”
Of course this idea was
laughed at, and thought to be
ridiculous. It is ridiculous but
at the same time fascinating if
you stop to think about it and
apply it to our country and its
freedom. The effect when ap-
plied to our country’s history
also resembles the domino
effect. We have a history of
conflict and war going back to
the Revolutionary War, Span-
ish American War, Civil War,
right up to the present day war
in the Middle East. From each
of these wars, lessons have
been learned, and the rewards
have been unique to each. But
through all of these, our free-
dom of the United States of
America has stood firm and
unwavering. Through each
and every one of these wars,
the symbol of our country,
Old Glory, has flown proud
and high. For this we as proud
Americans should forever be
grateful. With the flag blowing
proudly everywhere we go it
creates that “Butterfly Effect”
that I mentioned before, and
the effects of that flag blowing
have been felt in many places,
especially right here in our
own country.
I would like to share with
you a selection that was sent to
me by my sister this past week.
“Old Glory” was published in
her local newspaper and this is
how it goes:
I am the American flag.
Listen to me and I’ll tell you
my story. My colors are red,
white and blue. I have a field
of 50 stars and 13 stripes. I am
also known as “The Stars and
Stripes” and “Old Glory.” I
am honored to be in all public
places. I go to schools where
the children pledge allegiance
to me. I attend all sporting
events and stand proud and
fly high as they sing my song,
“The Star Spangled Banner.”
I am honored when I go by in
a parade and my people salute
me.
Yes, I’m the American flag.
I served under 40 some presi-
dents. I was in peace and war. I
was at the battle of Bunker Hill
and Valley Forge where I saw
the soldiers starve and freeze
to death. I was with General
Washington as he crossed the
Delaware. I was in the Civil
War where I saw father and
son, brother and brother fight
against each other to save
the Union. I was there when
they freed the slaves. I was
at Gettysburg with President
Lincoln, where in a few min-
utes he gave the most famous
speech ever heard, “The Get-
tysburg Address.” I went along
to the trenches in France in
World War I, the beaches of
Normandy in World War II,
the day which lives in infamy
at Pearl Harbor, the sands of
Iwo Jima, where a few soldiers
planted me in the sand to fly
high with honor over them. I
was in many wars and places
with the people of my country.
The farthest distance I have
traveled is to the moon where
I’m also flying high to honor
my country.
I am the American flag. I
stand for freedom, but freedom
has its price. Freedom doesn’t
prevail without tyranny. I was
disgraced many a time. I was
spit on, stepped on, shot at and
burned. I saw racism and oth-
er violence in my country, but
I have overcome, for I fly over
America, the greatest country
there is. A land of freedom, lib-
erty, opportunities, a place to
dream and live your dreams,
a land of bounteous blessings,
a land of milk and honey. A
land to worship your Lord and
Master. If we would just open
our eyes and hearts and be-
lieve in God and ourselves we
could move mountains. What a
great country I stand for. I’m
proud of my patriots. May they
be proud of me!
I am the American flag.
I am at the boot camp where
the morning reveille is played.
I am the cover over the casket
when one of my servicemen
or servicewomen who have
served their country reaches
their final resting place. And
I’ll fly high with honor while
taps are played for those who
have served their country and
have paid the price. They gave
their all so that I may fly free.
Yes, I am the American flag.
May I long wave over the land
of the free and the home of the
brave.
God Bless my Country!
God Bless America! Long may
She live!
As many of you already
know, I wore a POW bracelet
during and after the Viet Nam
conflict. I have had the great
pleasure of meeting and get-
ting to know this very special
veteran. What a dynamic man
he is. The first time that I met
him, I was able to thank him
personally for his sacrifice for
me and for this country. His
response was this, “No thanks
needed. I was just doing my
job.” This is the way it seems
to be with most veterans that
I have talked to. But I know in
my heart that even though they
have hung up the uniform, they
will always be soldiers of this
country. Their sacrifices are
truly worthy of all the recog-
nition and honor that they get,
and yet they receive it so hum-
bly.
In closing I would like to
share one final story taken from
the book Chicken Soup for the
Veteran’s Soul. This story was
shared by John McCain, who
as we know was a POW in Viet
Nam as well, along with my
POW. This story has to do with
the American Flag as well. It’s
called “Mike’s Flag.”
Mike was a Navy bombar-
dier who had been shot down
in 1967, about six months be-
fore I arrived. He had grown
up near Selma, AL. His family
was poor. He had not worn
shoes until he was 13 years
old. Character was their
wealth. They were good, righ-
teous people, and they raised
Mike to be hardworking and
loyal. He was 17 when he en-
listed in the Navy. As a young
sailor, he showed promise as a
leader and impressed his su-
periors enough to be offered a
commission.
What packages we were
allowed to receive from our
families often contained hand-
kerchiefs, scarves and other
clothing items. For some time,
Mike had been taking little
scraps of red and white cloth,
and with a needle he had fash-
ioned from a piece of bamboo,
he laboriously sewed an Amer-
ican flag onto the inside of his
blue prisoner’s shirt. Every
afternoon, before we ate our
soup, we would hang Mike’s
flag on the wall of our cell and,
together, recite the Pledge of
Allegiance. No other event of
the day had as much meaning
to us.
The guards discovered
Mike’s flag one afternoon
during a routine inspection
and confiscated it. They re-
turned that evening and took
Mike outside. For our benefit
as much as Mike’s, they beat
him severely, just outside our
cell, puncturing his eardrum
and breaking several of his
ribs. When they had finished,
they dragged him bleeding and
nearly senseless back into our
cell, and we helped him crawl
to his place on the sleeping
platform. After things quieted
down, we all lay down to go
to sleep. Before drifting off,
I happened to look toward a
corner of the room, where one
of the four naked light bulbs
that were always illuminated
in our cell cast a dim light
on Mike Christian. He had
crawled there quietly when
he thought the rest of us were
sleeping. With his eyes nearly
swollen shut from the beating,
he had quietly picked up his
needle and thread and began
sewing a new flag.
This is Honor, and there are
way too many people in this
country who no longer under-
stand it.
The true soldier fights not
because he hates what is in
front of him, but because he
loves what is behind him.
A veteran is someone who,
at one point, wrote a blank
check made payable to “HIS
COUNTRY” for an amount of
“up to and including his life.”
Again I say, “God bless my
Country. God bless America.
Long may She live.”
Speech given during Veteran’s Day ceremony
By Phil Monson
Twin Rivers technology
director Fred Johnson is step-
ping down at the end of the
first semester.
During a regular monthly
meeting of the Twin Rivers
Board of Education on Nov.
8 in Bode, the board accepted
the retirement of Johnson, who
serves the district on a part-
time basis. Johnson’s depar-
ture will be effective Dec. 21,
2012.
School Superintendent Greg
Darling says Johnson is going
to begin work in the private
sector. Darling said the dis-
trict will utilize the services of
Humboldt’s technology per-
sonnel.
In other action, the board
approved participation in the
Drug and Alcohol testing pro-
gram for 2012-2013.
The board also approved a
five percent English Language
Learning contingent with the
Humboldt district, contingent
on approval by the Humboldt
board at its Nov. 19 meeting.
The board approved an ap-
plication with the State Bud-
get Review Committee for
increasing enrollment, open
enrollment out and excel LEP
costs.
The board also approved a
list of goals for the 2012-2013
school year. Prior to the meet-
ing, the board received a pre-
sentation by preschool teacher
Tricia Gargano, whose class-
room this year is now located
in the former home economics
room in the Bode school.
Gargano outlined the dis-
trict’s preschool program and
gave a presentation on the
SmartBoard located in her
classroom listing the goals of
the program for students. Her
class was previously held in
the outdoor portable building,
which were abandoned, sold
and moved off the Bode school
grounds during the summer.
Principal Don Hasenkamp
reported on several topics.
Hasenkamp said students re-
ceived a bowling trip for reach-
ing their reading minute goals.
He discussed the 60-inch tele-
vision that is now in the cafete-
ria/gymnasium, which will be
used for various educational
activities for students.
Hasenkamp said the Iowa
Assessments testing are cur-
rently in process. He said par-
ent-teacher conferences went
well. He also noted fourth and
fifth graders helped with the
outdoor landscaping project in
front of the school on Oct. 24.
Fencing near the play-
ground west of the school
building has been installed.
Hasenkamp also told the board
that D.A.R.E. graduation will
be Dec. 6, for fifth graders.
Superintendent Darling re-
ported on AEA flow-through
money, which pays for profes-
sional development and spe-
cial education. Darling also
updated the board on certain
services the district maintains
each year.
“Regulations require cer-
tain services school districts
have to comply with. Any-
thing from monitoring as-
bestos, boiler guidelines, fire
extinguisher requirements.
There are a number of services
schools have to comply with,”
Darling said.
The board approved the
first, second and third reading
of an extensive list of policy
series items.
TR technology director steps down
The Humboldt Area Arts
Community looks forward to
your support through atten-
dance at the Art Encore this
Saturday, Nov. 17. The event
will be held at Rustix Restau-
rant and Reception with doors
opening at 6 p.m. Advance
tickets are $15 for HAAC
Members and $20 for non-
members. Tickets sold at the
door are all $20.
Tickets are available at
Witz End, Bank Iowa, HAAC
Board members and the art
center.
Assorted appetizers pro-
vided by Rustix and HAAC
volunteers will be served from
6:30-8:30 p.m. A wine and
cash bar will be open through-
out the evening. A youth silent
auction will take place from
6-8 p.m. The live auction starts
at 9 p.m., with services donat-
ed by Hundertmark Auction.
Silent auction bids will close
at 11 p.m.
Local musicians will per-
form the first part of the eve-
ning, including members of
the Red Carpet Rebels. HAAC
thanks Jill Pliner for organiz-
ing this part of the evening.
Music by DJ Chris Cran
will finish off the evening from
10 p.m.-midnight.
This year’s Encore theme,
“What a Feeling” will incor-
porate assorted art themed
items with tactile appeal. Also
on tap to be auctioned off are
community art pieces from the
2011 and 2012 art festivals.
Funds raised at the Encore
2012 help support the arts in
the Humboldt community in-
cluding: the annual art festival
and free activities for children,
youth and art teacher scholar-
ships, and free monthly ex-
hibits at the area art center to
name a few.
The HAAC thanks you for
your continued support!
Art Encore planned for Nov. 17
The city of Humboldt will
allow open burning of yard
waste on Saturday, Nov. 17,
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. No burn-
ing is allowed on the city right
of way. All fires must be at-
tended.
Burning date
Hours: M-F 8:30am-4:00pm
www.fsbwc.com
1301 6th Ave North, Humboldt • 515.604.6420 • Fax 515.604.6425
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Commercial banking needs!
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Dr. Gary Gonnerman • 405 Sumner Ave., Humboldt
Ph. 515-332-2755
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HOSPICE LIGHT UP A LIFE
Monday, November 26 - 7 p.m. Humboldt County Memorial Hospital.
Our Social Hour will be held INDOORS following the Lighting Ceremony.
A tax-deductible gift will light a bulb on the evergreen tree at the Path of Life
Garden. The light can be placed in memory of a loved one or in honor of an
individual who is of personal significance in the life of the contributor.
Please join us for the Tree Lighting in the Path of Life Garden at 7:00 p.m. fol-
lowed by the indoor activities in the Sun Room of the Long Term Care Unit of the
hospital. These activities will include Entertainment, Reading of the Memorialized
Names of Loved Ones and a Social Gathering.
Checks for a minimum of $10 per name are to be made payable to:
HOSPICE OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY
BOX 183, HUMBOLDT, IA 50548
Light Up a Life forms are available at the Humboldt County
Memorial Hospital and Humboldt County Public Health.
If you would like a form mailed to you, please call 515-332-2492.
Carolyn Ford gave the Address of the Day at the
2012 Veteran’s Day ceremony. The ceremony was held
Sunday in the VFW due to inclement weather. See more
photos at ww.humboldtnews.com. Humboldt Indepen-
dent photo.
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 3A
“We are running on a bare
bones, no frosting on the cake
operation. We’re doing a good
job. Academically we are do-
ing a great job and our test
scores prove that. But there’s
no areas where we can signifi-
cantly cut,” Fey said.
“Our kids are doing wonder-
fully under the circumstances.
Our scores prove that. We’re
very proud of the education
these kids are getting in grades
K-12,” Fey said.
“The financial balances will
not get better for either district
in the next few years. If our en-
rollment stays the same, costs
will go up and teachers will
get a small raise. Our teachers
have been wonderful at taking
very small raises because they
want to keep the place operat-
ing,” Fey said.
“We have functioned and
functioned and functioned –
but now it has caught up to us,”
Fey said. “The board will have
to look at some other possibili-
ties and make some difficult
decisions. Not immediately,
but in the years to come.”
“We’re going to the state
School Budget Review Com-
mittee to see if we can get the
Corwith-Wesley deficit taken
care of, but it is highly unlikely
they (state) will approve that.
I’ve talked to the state depart-
ment of education and they
have said, ‘you need to make
immediate cuts,’ or the SBRC
will not approve your plan,”
Fey said. “I’ve told the SBRC
‘we cannot make any more
cuts, or we won’t be meeting
state teaching standards.’ We
have to plan ahead as best as
we can for the next few years.”
Fey and Rotert say some of
the first changes will start with
sharing activities for the 2013-
14 school year. They have
already talked with neighbor-
ing districts about the possi-
bility of sharing activities and
some classes, but nothing has
been formally presented or ap-
proved.
“We will be seeking some
sharing of activities for next
year. That’s mostly due to low
numbers of kids,” Fey said.
“For example, I think we only
have seven junior high boys
next year, and we play eight-
man football. Our junior high
football coach has resigned.
We don’t have enough players
and we don’t’ have a coach, so
we are going to look at sharing
of some activities.”
Rotert reported on district
enrollment. LuVerne’s enroll-
ment has increased from 68 to
76 students over the past year.
“Since the official count
date on Oct. 1, we have lost
two or four students. But the
other day we had a new stu-
dent come in. I am amazed at
how mobile our society is,”
Fey said.
In action items, the board
approved on-time funding for
modified allowable growth for
increasing enrollment.
“When your enrollment
goes up, you can apply for
on-time funding. It doesn’t in-
crease our budget, but it guar-
antees our funding is on-time,”
Fey said. “They don’t do it for
the LuVernes of the world,
they do it for the Waukees of
the world, who see an increase
of 500 kids in one year and
they have to go out and hire
10-15 teachers to serve those
kids.”
“The rule is in place and we
will take advantage of it and
make the application for that
funding,” Fey said.
In personnel matters, the
board accepted the resignation
of the middle school football
coach Paul Garman.
The board also accepted a
bid of $55 per hour from Mc-
Peak Excavating to provide
snow removal for the upcom-
ing winter. The board also ap-
proved payment of bills for the
end of the month, along review
of committee meeting minutes
involving the site visit the state
conducted last winter.
“The last step of our site
visit from last year was our
SIAC/CTE committee meet-
ings and minutes. James
(Rotert) submitted those to the
state department of education.
That is the last official step for
our site visit,” Fey said.
The board’s next regular-
meeting is set for Dec. 12.
Future from front page
fice to be assigned a user name
and password to access the e-
edition. There is also an option
to subscribe to the e-edition of
the paper only.
The Humboldt Reminder
pages are also online each
week free of charge. Sev-
eral special sections are also
available to view online at no
charge.
The popular monthly mag-
azine, Humboldt NOW, is now
available online for the low
price of $1 per month. Print
editions are available at the
newspaper office and at gro-
cery stores, convenience stores
and banks.
“We’ve had so many re-
quests for the magazine and
the online edition allows peo-
ple from all over the world to
access Humboldt NOW,” Pub-
lisher Jim Gargano said.
The humboldtnews.com
website is extremely popular
with more than 22,000 visitors
per month, a figure that con-
tinues to grow. More “Break-
ing News” will be put on the
website as stories unfold in the
Humboldt County area.
Viewing and ordering pho-
tos has also been made easier.
Readers can view the photos
that appear in the Independent,
and also the hundreds that
don’t make it in.
“We might take 100 shots
at an event, but maybe only a
few get in the paper. People
can browse through the rest
of them in the Photo Galleries
and if there are some they like,
they can order them at very
reasonable prices,” Gargano
said.
The humboldtnews website
has news, sports, obituaries,
Cook of the Week, weather
and easy to access links impor-
tant to the Humboldt County
area. Readers simply click on
any ad on the page to find out
more information about that
advertiser.
“Humboldtnews.com is
the number one website in the
Humboldt County area and
that’s exciting to advertisers.
There’s no one else that cov-
ers the stories of the Humboldt
area like our excellent staff.
We will continue to strive
to provide our readers with
the best local news coverage
they’ve come to expect,” Gar-
gano said.
For more information, con-
tact the newspaper office at
(515) 332-2514, or email in-
dependent@humboldtnews.
com, or visit www.humboldt-
news.com.
Website from front page
In the Humboldt County
Board of Supervisors story
that appeared in the Nov. 8
issue, a clarification should
be noted regarding the sale of
the Humboldt County mainte-
nance sheds. Humboldt Coun-
ty Engineer Paul Jacobson re-
ports that the “and contents,”
refers to any fuel oil or liquid
propane that may be in tanks
sold with the buildings, no
tools or equipment presently
in the buildings is included
unless specifically stated in
the legal advertisement for the
structures.
Clarification
The Humboldt County
Ministerial Association’s an-
nual Christmas Food Basket
Distribution will take place
on Tuesday, Dec. 18, from
the Humboldt County Fair-
grounds.
Baskets must be brought
to the fairgrounds between 10
a.m. and 6 p.m. on Monday,
Dec. 17.
B askets can be picked up
by the assigned people at the
fairgrounds on Tuesday, Dec.
18, between 8:30 a.m. and
3:30 p.m. Humboldt-Dakota
City pick up time is 11 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. All others are from
8:30 to 11 a.m.
More than 250 families in
Humboldt County enjoy a bet-
ter Christmas because of this
event, which is coordinated by
the Humboldt County UDMO
Outreach Office.
Christmas
Basket
distribution
A Fridley Theatre
HUMOTA
HUMBOLDT 332-5921
www.fridleytheatres.com
For Advance Tickets And Show Times
ALL DIGITAL PROJECTION
ALL MATINEE TIMES...
2D FEATURES ALL SEATS $3.00
3D FEATURES ALL SEATS $5.00
PG13
FRI-THURS, NOV. 16 - 22
THE TWILIGHT SAGA:
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Kristen Stewart - Taylor Lautner
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SPECIAL ADVANCE SHOWING
THURSDAY, NOV. 15 At 10:00pm
Then
FRI: 7:00, 9:25
SAT-SUN: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:20
MON-TUES: 7:00, 9:20
WED: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:20
THURS, (Nov. 22): 4:20, 7:00, 9:20
ENDS WED, NOV. 14
WRECK-IT RALPH 3D (PG) 8:40
Major Credit
Cards Honored
Like us on
Our Annual FREE HOLIDAY
FAMILY MATINEE MOVIES
Start FRIDAY, NOV. 23
Check Our Extra Advertisement In The
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10
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OFF
Great STOCKING STUFFERS
DOOR PRIZES
OUR ANNUAL
PRE-CHRISTMAS
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FRIDAY, NOV. 16
Thru SUNDAY, NOV. 25
GIFT CARD
PURCHASES!
GIFT CARDS
ACCEPTED ANYTIME
At Fridley Theatres
Box Office Or Concession
Free Popcorn Every Tuesday
To All Paid Admissions
ENDS THURS, NOV. 15
WRECK-IT RALPH 2D (PG) 6:30
Clay Construction
* LOCAL CONTRACTOR *
For all your
home renovation needs.
Call Mike 515-890-1612
* FREE ESTIMATES * BONDED *
*WAC, see salesman for details.
TRUCKS
2011 Dodge 1/2T Crew 4x4, 8,000 miles ........
$
28,995
2010 Chevy 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4 .........................
$
24,995
2009 Chevy 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4, 8-foot box .....
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23,995
2009 GMC 3/4T Crew 4x4, leather ................
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29,995
2008 Chevy Colorado Ext. Cab ........................
$
13,995
2008 Chevy 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4 .........................
$
18,995
2008 Ford F250 Ext. Cab 4x4 Lariat ................
$
18,995
2006 GMC 1/2T Crew 4x4 ...............................
$
18,995
2006 Dodge 1/2T Crew Cab 4x4 .....................
$
17,995
2001 Dodge 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4 ...........................
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2001 Ford Ranger ...............................................
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(2) 2001 Dodge 3/4T Reg. Cab 4x4 ...................
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2000 Chevy 1/2T Reg. Cab 4x4 .........................
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4A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
JAMES GARGANO ............................. Publisher
JEFF GARGANO ................................. Managing Editor
JAIME ZWEIBOHMER........................ Sales Representative
RACHEL BOELMAN ........................... Advertising Design Manager
BETSY FLOT ....................................... Office Assistant/Receptionist
DEBBIE KILEY .................................... Office Manager
JEN LARSON ...................................... Advertising Layout and Design
DANETTE MILLER .............................. Production Manager
PHIL MONSON ................................... Managing Sports Editor
SUE REIMERS .................................... Advertising Layout and Design
BRANDY SATERN .............................. Sales Representative
JANETTE SCHAUMBURG .................. Advertising Layout and Design
KENT THOMPSON ............................. News Editor
Published weekly on Thursdays by Humboldt Printing Company at
512 Sumner Avenue, P.O. Box 157, Humboldt, Iowa 50548. Periodical
postage paid at Humboldt, Iowa. USPS #254060.
Postmaster: send address changes to The Humboldt Independent,
P.O. Box 157, Humboldt, IA 50548.
NEWS & ADVERTISING DEADLINE:
MONDAY – 3:00 P.M.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
$47.00 per year in Iowa • $58.00 in other states
INTERNET ADDRESS
http://www.humboldtnews.com
E-Mail us at: independent@humboldtnews.com
Telephone (515) 332-2514 • FAX (515) 332-1505
Advertising Rate Card available upon request.
2011
Way Back When
Courthouse
TEN YEARS AGO
2002
Michelle Lindquist was
named second team All-North
Central Conference volleyball
and teammate Allison Burg-
ers received honorable men-
tion honors. Their selections
by the league’s coaches, were
announced at Humboldt’s pot-
luck dinner banquet held at
the Middle School cafeteria.
The banquet paid tribute to the
2002 Wildcat volleyball team,
which compiled a won-loss re-
cord of 17-11-4 overall, 5-4 in
the North Central Conference.
2002
The Beaver Wide Awake
4-H Club had their fourth an-
nual scavenger hunt, collect-
ing 280 pounds of food for
the Humboldt County Food
Pantry. Members collecting
were Kelsey Shiflett, Kaylee
Nelson, Leann Nelson, Alyssa
Shiflett, Kate Cleveland, Mar-
ci Vinsand, Kristin Nelson,
Jenna Vinsand and Brooke
Nelson.
2002
School officials of the Twin
Rivers Valley High School
have released the names of the
senior students named to the
first quarter honor roll. They
are as follows: Josh Banwart,
Kyle Behrendsen, Mack-
enzie Bell, Nathan Black,
Lucy Blocker, Betsi Borland,
Melissa Bratland, Michelle
Day, Megan Edwards, Lisa
Frederiksen, Joel Harklau,
Jennie Hauck, Jamie Hoover,
Bethany Jacobson, Abby Jen-
sen, Jeff Larson, Jacob New-
ton, Travis Scott, Josie Smith,
Adrienne Trauger, Justen Van-
Vacter, Matt Wallace, and Jill
Zeman.
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO
1997
The new Cottonwood Trail
is nearing completion through
Humboldt. The trail, less than
one mile in length, goes from
the old power house near Bee-
be Park and Bicknell Park west
along the river, under the new
Highway 169 bridge and along
the fish ponds and ends at the
Reasoner Dam at Lake Noko-
mis.
1997
A total of four area high
school volleyball players re-
ceived all-conference honors
by the coaches of the North
Star Conference. Twin Riv-
er Valley’s Jessie Scott and
Karen Eisenbarth joined Cor-
with-Wesley-LuVerne’s Stacy
Gremmer and Gina Roberts on
honorable mention all-confer-
ence.
1997
The Corwith-Wesley-Lu-
Verne Junior High School foot-
ball team members are Shane
Elvington, Josh Garman, Ryan
White, Jerad Cutshall, Andy
Hart, Kelly Parks, Alan Ricke,
Trent Wagner, Nick Kiley,
Brandon Hakanson, Bruce
Collins, Brent Coleman, Eric
Grady, Aaron Hunt, Ryan
Wempen, Josh Sullivan, Clay
Schiltz, and Adam Weringa,
manager. Coach is Paul So-
nius.
TWENTY-FIVE
YEARS AGO
1987
Schnurr and Co., P.C.
Certified Public Accountants
have admitted Timothy P. An-
derson, CPA of Humboldt as
one of two new partners to the
firm. Anderson joined the firm
in 1979 and has managed the
Humboldt office since 1981. A
graduate of Fort Dodge Senior
High School, Iowa Central
Community College and the
University of Northern Iowa,
he received his CPA certificate
in November, 1977.
1987
Jack McClellan of LuVerne
shot a hole-in-one at the Spring
Valley Golf Course recently.
McClellan’s ace came on the
130-yard eighth hole using a
nine-iron. Merv Bristow and
Al Sinclair of Livermore were
on hand to witness the gem.
1987
The following were hon-
ored as the 1987 Volunteers
of the Year: Donna Swanson,
Christine Nielsen, Dan Mc-
Clannahan, Jane Sayre, Max-
ine Dwyer, Donald Boswell,
Dr. Asa Arent, Pat Bassett,
Delores Weier, Frank Mayall,
Marilyn Hundertmark, Jeff
Gargano, and Maury Abens.
FORTY YEARS AGO
1972
Army Private Gerald M.
Bormann, 22, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Donald N. Bormann,
LuVerne, recently completed
eight weeks of basic train-
ing at the U.S. Army Training
Center, Armor, Fort Knox, KY.
1972
Cadet John L. Campbell,
III, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
Campbell Jr., Humboldt, has
been awarded a “Sharpshoot-
er“ marksmanship ribbon at
Wentworth Military Academy,
Lexington, MO.
1972
Humboldt’s basketball
squad, under head coach John
Westphal, opens the 1972-73
cage season at home against
Estherville. Varsity members
are Doug Allen, Jim Sayers,
Tom Moklestad, Jerry Da-
vis, Mike Jorgensen, Kevin
Brownfield, Terry Brownfield,
Mike Patton, Dan Hendrick-
son, Dean Crist, Leon Heider,
Dan Beebe, Jeff Kleiss, Jon
Spence, Gene Crist, and Greg
Oberman.
FORTY-FIVE
YEARS AGO
1967
Each of the three girls’ 4-H
clubs in Humboldt selected an
outstanding member for the
year at the organization’s an-
nual awards day at the First
National Bank Social Center.
They are Barbara Johnson of
the Topnotchers, Carla East-
man of the Merry Maidens and
Judy Weiss of the Busy Bees.
1967
The Humboldt County
Farm Bureau has scheduled
open house activities for its
new office building located
two blocks north and two
blocks east of the intersec-
tion of Highways 3 and 169
in Humboldt. Delmar War-
ren is the office manager with
Vernice Hoops, secretary. Jack
Walrath is the regional field-
man.
1967
Geoff Mickelson, veteran
tackle for the Humboldt Wild-
cats, has been named to the
first All-North Central Confer-
ence and All-Northwest Iowa
football teams. He is the only
Humboldt player to be named
to the first unit of either hon-
orary squad, but is joined by
Doug Logue, Twin Rivers
halfback on the first All-North-
west Iowa unit.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
1962
A crew of printing plant
moving specialists completed
a week of work here. The crew
moved one of the Linotypes
of the Jaqua Printing Co. The
publishing-printing firm’s en-
tire mechanical department is
now in operation in a new lo-
cation, 528 Sumner Avenue.
The editorial and business of-
fice will be moved to the new
location by Nov. 19.
1962
St. Mary’s Society held its
monthly meeting. The follow-
ing officers were elected for
1963: Mrs. Leo Stahl, presi-
dent; Mrs. Richard Cahill, vice
president; Mrs. Jerry McCur-
ry, secretary; and Mrs. John
Ravnickar, treasurer.
1962
About 3,200 persons took
advantage of the oral polio
vaccine, Sabin type II, offered
in Humboldt. Members of the
County Medical Society and
county nurses’ association co-
operated with the Humboldt
Kiwanis Club in staging the
day-long event. Officials of the
Kiwanis Club say they plan to
have another clinic after the
first of the year to distribute
the type I oral polio vaccine.
The various types of the vac-
cine are designed to provide
immunity to three different
types of polio.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
1952
Three members of the
Humboldt Wildcats champion-
ship team won all-conference
spots on the offensive team
and one was named to the de-
fensive unit, Coach Al Hadar
has announced. They are John
Holdefer, unanimous choice at
quarterback; Merv Johnson at
end and Ken Lovrien at guard
on the offensive team and
Marv Sorensen at halfback on
defensive. Sorensen is a junior,
the others are seniors.
1952
Members of the Barr Art
Association from Gilmore
City, Rolfe and Humboldt met
in Humboldt for the last meet-
ing of the year. The following
officers were elected: Mrs.
Maude Herrick of Gilmore
City, president; Mrs. Bertha
Shepard of Humboldt, vice
president; and Mrs. Agnes
Neal of Gilmore City, secre-
tary-treasurer.
1952
Two sons of Mr. and Mrs.
Viggo Pedersen of Hardy are
now in the armed services. Pfc.
Cecil V. Pedersen has been in
the Army since January and is
now serving with the 40th In-
fantry division in Korea. Pvt.
John E. Pedersen was inducted
into the Army in August and
is now taking basic training at
Fort Riley, KS.
MAGISTRATE
Candra R. A. Timmer-
man, Rock Valley, operating
non-registered vehicle, fined
$127.50.
Janae A. Oien, Ogden,
speeding, fined $181.50.
Robert E. Martin, Hum-
boldt, unsafe passing, fined
$195.
Andrew J. Fisher, Bode,
speeding, fined $114.
Shawn E. Shaft, Badger,
violation of conditions of mi-
nor’s school license, fined
$132.50.
Timothy T. Tucker, Wa-
terloo, failure to comply
with safety regulations, fined
$127.50.
Jesse Montes, Urbandale,
speeding, fined $114.
Jerry J. Homsey, Rake, fail-
ure to maintain safety belts,
fined $127.50.
Jerry J. Homsey, Rake, no
valid drivers license, $330.
Franklin A. Salvatore II,
Whittemore, manner of con-
veyance (loaded gun), fined
$127.50.
Michael C. Day, Gilmore
City, failure to obey stop sign,
fined $195.
David D. Dischler, Fort
Dodge, failure to yield upon
entering through highway,
fined $200.
Melissa M. Liedtke, Fort
Dodge, speeding, fined $119.
Travis W. Roberts, Bode,
failure to secure child, fined
$195.
Sana Vacquez, Humboldt,
no valid drivers license, fined
$330.
James W. Behrens, Hum-
boldt, careless driving, fined
$107.25.
William A. Wille, Titonka,
failure to maintain control,
fined $200.
Teralynn I. Amen, Hum-
boldt, speeding, fined $114.
Brad L. Becker, Burt, op-
eration by unqualified driver,
fined $161.25.
Brad L. Becker, Burt, fail-
ure to comply with safety reg-
ulations, fined $161.25.
William D. Pogge, Hum-
boldt, speeding, fined $114.
Frank E. Marchant, Gilm-
ore City, no valid drivers li-
cense, fined $335.
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
DISTRICT COURT
PETITIONS
Capital One Bank (USA),
N.A. vs. Abigail A. Kunert,
account $5,373.67, plus costs
and interest.
Capital One Bank (USA),
N.A. vs. Donella A. Hacker,
account $7,297.47, plus costs
and interest.
Forest Specialties, LLC vs.
Herion Roofing, Inc., account
$59,845.69, plus costs and in-
terest.
JUDGMENTS
State of Iowa vs. Cody J.
Sayers, Humboldt, 3
rd
degree
criminal mischief amended to
5
th
degree criminal mischief,
one year probation, deferred
judgment, pay costs $1,049.93.
DISMISSALS
Elaine Moss vs. Briarwood
Apartments, damages as a re-
sult of injuries suffered on de-
fendant’s property.
JP Morgan Chase Bank,
N.A. vs. Bernard R. Terwilliger
A/K/A Bernard Robert Terwil-
liger, et al, foreclosure without
redemption, $62,5 45.16, plus
costs and interest.
McKinsey S. Gonder vs.
Jamieson L. Denklau, petition
for paternity, custody, visita-
Livermore, Part of Vacated Al-
ley, Block 1, Meaghers Addi-
tion, Livermore.
Tamara Mennenga to
Dustin M. Scott, Billie E.
Scott, S 1/2, Lot 3, Block 58,
Original Town, Humboldt, S
1/2, Lot 4, Block 58, Original
Town, Humboldt.
Kurt Weinert, Kara Wein-
ert, Shane Dickey, Tracy Dick-
ey to Mark D. Cirks, Stacy K.
Cirks, Lot 46, Plat 2, River
Oaks Subdivision, Sec. 31,
Twp. 92, Rng. 28.
Jerry M. Beenken, Do-
netta M. Beenken to Nathan
J. Fischer, Amanda J. Fischer,
Lot 10, Block 94, Original
Town, Dakota City.
Ponderosa Golf Course,
Inc. to Paul R. Latta Joint Re-
vocable Trust, Sally A. Latta
Joint Revocable Trust, NE, N
1/2, Sec. 33, Twp. 91, Rng.
30, NE, SE, Sec. 33, Twp. 91,
Rng. 30, Land in NE, SW, Sec.
33, Twp. 91, Rng. 30, Land
in NE, NW, Sec. 33, Twp. 91,
Rng. 30, Out Lot 6, Original
Town, Pioneer, Land in Pio-
neer.
COURT OFFICER DEEDS
Glori Wolf Conservator-
ship, Elisabeth Wolf, Con-
servator, to EWOLF LLC, S
1/2, Lot 1, Block 66, Original
Town, Humboldt, S 1/2, Lot
2, Block 66, Original Town,
Humboldt.
Wayne T. Johnson Estate,
Steve Samuels, Executor, to
Billie E. Scott, Dustin M.
Scott, Lot 1, Block 26, Origi-
nal Town, Dakota City, Part
of Lot 2, Block 26, Original
Town, Dakota City.
Lucille Petras Estate, Joan
P. Rude, Executor, to Jerry M.
Beenken, Donetta M. Been-
ken, Lot 7, Oak Hill Addition,
Humboldt.
CONTRACTS
Humboldt County Housing
Development Corp to Berte
and Sons, Ltd., Lot 11, Eagle
Ridge Addition, Humboldt.
Humboldt County Housing
Development Corp to Michael
Schachtner, Deann Merris,
Lot 16, Eagle Ridge Addition,
Humboldt.
Humboldt County Housing
Development Corp to Ryan
Gidel, Heidi Gidel, Lot 14,
Eagle Ridge Addition, Hum-
boldt.
Humboldt County Housing
Development Corp to Charles
D. Thompson, Lisa D. Thomp-
son, Lot 12, Eagle Ridge Ad-
dition, Humboldt.
Humboldt County Hous-
ing Development Corp to Brad
D./Brad Benjamin, Keri A./
Keri Benjamin, Lot 13, Eagle
Ridge Addition, Humboldt.
Humboldt County Housing
Development Corp to Berte
and Son Ltd., Lot 17, Eagle
Ridge Addition, Humboldt.
Humboldt County Housing
Development Corp to Berte
and Son Ltd., Lot 18, Eagle
Ridge Addition, Humboldt.
tion, and support.
SMALL CLAIMS
PETITIONS
Power Cooperative Em-
ployees Credit Union vs. Ja-
cob Reimers, Eagle Grove,
overdrawn checking account,
$335.18, plus costs and inter-
est.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Heather Nerem, Renwick, ac-
count $694, plus costs and in-
terest.
H and R Accounts, Inc. vs.
Deb Skeeters, Humboldt, Jody
Skeeters, Humboldt, account
$411.80, plus costs and inter-
est.
Kirk C. Whittlesey, OD
vs. Daniel W. Shepard, Fort
Dodge, account $137.02, plus
costs and interest.
Kirk C. Whittlesey, OD vs.
Bradley Dahl, Rolfe, account
$282.37, plus costs and inter-
est.
Community Lumber Sup-
ply, Inc. vs. Duane Knowles,
Gilmore City, building mate-
rials and supplies, $3,370.39,
plus costs and interest.
JUDGMENTS
Financial Security Services
vs. Vernon Studebaker, Da-
kota City, account $1,292, plus
costs and interest.
PROBATES
Estate of Charles A. Joiner,
Deceased, Ramona R. Joiner,
Executor.
Estate of Bernadine Kiss-
inger, Deceased, Cheryl Graaf,
Executor.
Pauline B. Holden Family
Trust, Gary S. Holden, Trust-
ee.
MARRIAGE LICENSES
Robert Michael Fouarge,
Thor, legal, and Michelle Re-
nae Edge, Thor, legal.
DISSOLUTIONS OF
MARRIAGE
Betsy G. Flot vs. James M.
Flot.
COUNTY RECORDER
WARRANTY DEEDS
Kathy L. Jergenson, Dennis
R. Jergenson, Sandra K. Stein,
Michael J. Stein to Jacob L.
Hilton, Lot 3, Block 9, Lathrop
Addition, Humboldt.
KS Company LLC to W
and H Cooperative, Lot 1,
Block 5, Original Town, Liver-
more, Lot 2, Block 5, Original
Town, Livermore, Lot 3, Block
5, Original Town, Livermore,
Lot 4, Block 5, Original Town,
Livermore, Lot 5, Block 5,
Original Town, Livermore,
Lot 6, Block 5, Original Town,
Livermore.
Edwin F. Klein to Terry
Thilges, Kari Thilges, NE,
NW, Sec. 7, Twp. 93, Rng. 28.
Douglas D. Berte, Darcy L.
Berte to Matthew T. Brown,
Jennifer S. Brown, N 1/2, Lot
1, Block 41, Original Town,
Humboldt, N 1/2, Lot 2, Block
41, Original Town, Humboldt.
Robert J. Collins, Eileen B.
Collins, Samuel L. McLean,
Amber M. McClean to John D.
Fisher, Susan J. Fisher, Lot 2,
Block 1, Meaghers Addition,
To The Editor:
On Monday night, Nov. 26,
the Humboldt County Hospice
will sponsor the annual fund-
raiser “Light Up A Life” to be
held in the Hospital’s Path of
Life Garden at 7 p.m.
You may honor or remem-
ber your loved one (ones)
by purchasing a light in their
honor to be hung on the Me-
morial Tree in the garden. A
minimum of $10 is asked for
each name submitted. These
names will be read as the Me-
morial Tree is lighted. A short
program will follow and re-
freshments will be served in
the sunroom of the hospital.
All funds are kept in Hum-
boldt County to be used by
future Humboldt County hos-
pice patients for their care.
The Hospice program is de-
signed to assist patients with
a terminal diagnosis and their
families. A respite program is
also available that offers an
opportunity for the caregivers
to have a break for as much as
six hours a week. Part of the
program also includes a Hos-
pice Room in the Humboldt
County Memorial Hospital
where terminal patients who
require pain management or
other needs may occupy.
If you’d like to honor your
loved ones in this way, please
submit their name (s) to Hos-
pice of Humboldt County,
P.O. Box 183, Humboldt, IA
50548, along with the dona-
tion.
Ruth Jacobson,
Humboldt
Letter To The Editor
The Humboldt girl’s basketball team from 1948-49, included, front row (l to r):
Vernice Kuehnast, Anita Schmidtke, Johnna Lowder, Pat Weir, and Helen Torkel-
son. Back row: Bonnie Klein, Donna Hibbard, Lou Terwilliger, and Joann Anderson.
Heritage Book, Vol. 2, submitted by Marilyn Dodgen.
Humboldt’s 1948-49 girl’s basketball team
See Courthouse, 5A
Levi Miller, a student at
Northwestern College in Or-
ange City, is student teaching
this semester. In order to be
accepted into the teacher edu-
cation program, students must
maintain a 2.5 cumulative
grade point average, submit
an entrance portfolio, success-
fully pass the Pre-Professional
Skills Test and receive depart-
mental recommendation.
Miller is a senior and is ma-
joring in business education at
Northwestern College. He is
teaching business education
at Le Mars Community High
School. Miller is the son of
Timothy and Debra Miller of
Humboldt.
Levi Miller is student
teaching at LeMars
210 South 25th St.
Ft. Dodge, IA 50501
(515) 955-8200
(888) 293-3761
Mon. - Thur. 9 am - 7 pm
Fri. 9 am - 6pm
Saturday 9 am - 5 pm
Sunday 12 pm - 5 pm
Many
Styles &
Colors
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 5A
QUIT CLAIM DEEDS
Orlys Jean Maassen to An-
drew C. Maassen, Lot 6, Block
3, Gangestads Addition, Bode.
Humboldt County Hous-
ing Development Corp to City
of Humboldt, Land in Sec.
2, Twp. 91, Rng. 29, Land in
Humboldt.
Courthouse
from 4A
8 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 13, 2012
NEW Cooperative
Corn .............................. 7.21
Oats .............................. 1.40
Beans .......................... 13.70
Markets
The Humboldt Police De-
partment (HPD) investigated
two traffic accidents and made
two arrests during the past
week.
On Wednesday, Nov. 7, at
4:55 p.m., an accident was re-
ported in the 300 block of 4
th
Street North.
According to the report, a
2008 Dodge Ram 1500 pickup
driven by Dana M. Westphal,
29, Humboldt, was back-
ing from a driveway when he
struck a legally parked 2009
Volkswagen Jetta belonging
Rita R. Wessels, Badger.
The accident caused an es-
timated $500 minor damage to
Westphal’s pickup and an esti-
mated $3,000 disabling dam-
age to the driver’s side door of
Wessels’ Jetta.
There were no injuries re-
ported and no charges filed.
Police investigated a two-
vehicle accident causing pos-
sible injury on Monday, Nov.
12, at 10:45 a.m.
The accident occurred on
Highway 169, near the inter-
section with 9
th
Avenue North.
According to the report,
a 2004 Ford F-150 pickup
driven by Harold H. Fick, 79,
Callender, was southbound
on Highway 169 in the inside
lane.
A 2002 Oldsmobile In-
trigue was exiting the Casey’s
parking lot and was attempting
to make a left turn to go south
on Highway 169. The driver
of the vehicle was Joshua A.
Goodell, 16, Humboldt.
Goodell said he did not
see Fick’s truck approaching
and struck the left front door
broadside with the right front
bumper of the car he was driv-
ing.
There was an estimated
$2,500 damage to both of the
vehicles.
No injuries were report-
ed at the scene. Later, Tre
A. Mobley, 20, a passenger
in the Goodell vehicle, was
transported to the Humboldt
County Memorial Hospital by
his father, for treatment of pos-
sible injuries.
Goodell was charged with
failure to yield the right of way
upon entering a through high-
way.
In other news:
Nov. 5
4:42 p.m.—A bicycle built
for two was reported lean-
ing next to a tree on 9
th
Street
North. The adult red Huffy
tandem was taken to the city
shed for storage.
6:51 p.m.—A Humboldt
female reported that her boy-
friend was headed toward
Humboldt in the 1700 block of
Lincoln Avenue and was near-
ly ran off the road by a black
car.
9:41 p.m.—A noise dis-
turbance was reported in the
400 block of 1
st
Avenue North.
Police spoke with the alleged
offenders and gave them a dis-
orderly conduct warning.
10:46 p.m.—An ambu-
lance was paged to 4
th
Avenue
South for a female having dif-
ficulty breathing.
Nov. 6
3:02 a.m.—An ambulance
was requested on 8
th
Street
South for a very ill male.
9:45 a.m.—An ambulance
was requested on Oak Hill
Drive for an unresponsive fe-
male.
11:14 a.m.—HCMH asked
that the landing pad be secured
for a Life Flight helicopter.
2:08 p.m.—A welfare
check on a one-year-old child
was requested by Kansas
Child Services.
6:25 p.m.—Received a re-
port that someone was taking
junk steel from the city. An
officer advised that the person
had authority to remove the
scrap metal.
9:07 p.m.—Police conduct-
ed a traffic stop in the 1200
block of 4
th
Avenue SW. The
vehicle was towed and Justin
Doty, 27, Humboldt, was taken
to jail and charged with operat-
ing while intoxicated, first of-
fense.
10:50 p.m.—A caller on 8
th
Avenue North requested lifting
assistance.
Nov. 7
12:19 a.m.—A large, dark-
colored cat was reported run-
ning toward Hy-Vee.
7:57 a.m.—A property-
damage accident involving
Christopher Witzke of Da-
kota City and Jamie Balk of
Livermore was reported in
front of the high school. The
HPD contacted the Iowa DOT.
Something slick was on the
roadway.
4:55 p.m.—A property
damage accident was reported
on 4
th
Street North.
5:15 p.m.—An ambulance
was requested at Taft Park. A
male subject had fallen and
hit his head on the basketball
court.
8:11 p.m.—A silver Dodge
pickup was reported swerving
in the 1400 block of Highway
169 South.
9:02 p.m.—A burglary
alarm was reported at Hard-
ee’s. Everything was OK.
There was no burglary.
Nov. 8
1:06 a.m.—An officer ob-
served someone on top of the
Fareway store. It was a repair
person working on the refrig-
eration unit.
5:16 a.m.—An ambulance
was wanted on Walnut Circle
for a female subject.
1:48 p.m.—An officer was
requested at Humboldt High
School in reference to a stu-
dent with a controlled sub-
stance. Charges are pending
an analysis of the substance by
the state crime lab.
2:39 p.m.—The security
company reported a burglary
alarm at First Avenue Chiro-
practic. The lobby door was
open. The door was secured.
Nov. 9
12:49 p.m.—Jamie Kirch-
hoff, Humboldt, reported a
case of identity theft.
4:29 p.m.—An ambulance
was requested on 15
th
Street
North for a female who had
fallen.
4:43 p.m.—A resident on
Forest Boulevard wanted to
speak to an officer about where
to build a recreational fire.
6:19 p.m.—An officer was
requested to secure the HCMH
landing pad.
10:06 p.m.—A case of van-
dalism/criminal mischief was
reported on 3
rd
Avenue SW.
Someone ran over a mailbox.
Nov. 10
12:40 a.m.—A suspicious
vehicle was reported in the
Hy-Vee parking lot. It was a
man sleeping in a van. Police
asked the man to move along.
He said he would be going
home.
9:25 a.m.—A Rolfe wom-
an came into the LEC to report
a property dispute.
1:41 p.m.—Krystal Jones,
Humboldt, reported that her
back door was open and her
medicine cabinet doors were
open but nothing was taken
from her apartment. She no-
ticed the break-in about 5 p.m.
the previous afternoon.
10:26 p.m.—A Humboldt
woman reported harassment
by phone/text. The offending
party was contacted by police
and told to quit harassing the
woman, and that charges could
be forthcoming.
8:00 p.m.—An officer was
out with a drunk subject in
front of the Emergency Op-
erations Center on Sumner Av-
enue.
4:28 p.m.—A Humboldt
female reported a case of tres-
passing. HPD arrested Joshua
J. Andersen, 27, Humboldt,
and charged him with criminal
mischief and fifth degree theft.
5:24 p.m.—An intoxicated
subject was reported at Kum
and Go. The subject was gone
upon officers’ arrival.
4:06 p.m.—A man fell on
6
th
Avenue North and was ex-
periencing concussion-like
symptoms after hitting his
head. An ambulance was re-
quested.
Nov. 11
4:35 p.m.—A possible
drunk driver was reported in
the 2600 block of Penn Av-
enue. A deputy observed the
driver and he appeared to be
OK.
5:48 p.m.—A possible
drunk driver was reported in
the 2400 block of Lincoln Av-
enue. It was an older model
Cadillac. The information was
given to all city and county
cars.
Nov. 12
10:47 a.m.—A traffic ac-
cident involving Harold H.
Fick, Callender, and Joshua
A. Goodell, Humboldt, was
reported on Highway 169 near
Jensen Trailers.
11:16 a.m.—A vehicle that
was parked west of Dollar
General for longer than the al-
lotted time was towed.
1:40 p.m.—Back Seat
Diner reported a transient. The
owners gave the man bus fare
to Wisconsin. The HPD se-
cured a room for him at the Su-
per 8 Motel and Sheriff Kruger
transported him to the bus stop
in Fort Dodge.
Several accidents investigated, arrests made
By Kent Thompson
Humboldt and Webster
County Emergency Man-
agement Agencies have an-
nounced that they will be
conducting a free weeklong
training academy for any-
one interested in becoming a
CERT (Community Emergen-
cy Response Team) volunteer.
The class will be training
preparation for CERT mem-
bers who will be part of a
mock mass casualty exercise
that will be held in downtown
Humboldt from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
on Saturday, Dec. 8. The mock
disaster will be a simulated gas
explosion at the Finch build-
ings, 611/613 Sumner Ave.
CERT members are com-
munity volunteers who are
called to aid in emergency and
disaster situations and are de-
ployed by the authority of the
county emergency manage-
ment director.
They can be asked to per-
form a variety of duties includ-
ing but not limited to traffic
and crowd control, search and
rescue, identification and basic
triage of emergency disaster
victims, assistance as assigned
by other on scene emergency
departments.
“We are not trying to be
firefighters or police officers,”
said Ron Vought, Webster
County CERT training coor-
dinator, who is organizing the
class in early December.
“We are willing hands and
bodies who can assist first re-
sponders at an accident or di-
saster scene,” Vought said.
CERT teams combine the
services and skills of the Civ-
il Air Patrol, amateur radio
emergency service, and indi-
viduals from all walks of life
with administrative, medical
and technical backgrounds.
The Humboldt County
CERT group currently has
around one dozen members
and is seeking more communi-
ty-minded volunteers to help.
The current CERT team mem-
bers have undergone extensive
in-class and in-the-field train-
ing, as well as participated in a
number and a variety of mock
disaster drills.
The class will be offered
free of charge. Volunteers must
attend all five sessions and
take and pass a final quiz to be
certified as a CERT volunteer.
All of the classes will be
held at the Humboldt County
Emergency Operations Center
located east of the Humboldt
County Law Enforcement
Center. The street address is
430 Sumner Ave.
Classes will be held in the
evenings, Monday, Dec. 3-Fri-
day, Dec. 7.
Monday’s class will in-
clude disaster preparedness,
fire science and safety and util-
ity controls. Tuesday’s class
will cover disaster medical
operations. Wednesday’s unit
will be triage basics and CERT
organization.
Thursday’s class will be
about disaster psychology and
a primer on terrorism. Friday’s
class will be light search and
rescue operations.
Saturday, Dec. 8, there will
be a course review and quiz
beginning at 1:30 p.m., fol-
lowed by preparations for the
mass casualty exercise and the
exercise itself at 5:30 p.m.
The course will include
both classroom instruction and
field simulated hands-on exer-
cises.
In addition to seeking
CERT volunteers, people who
would like to serve as by-
standers, worried parents and
relatives and mock disaster
victims are asked to contact
Vought. All they have to do is
sign a waiver of liability form
and show up by 4 p.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 8. All ages are
needed for this drill.
“It is important to remem-
ber that disasters are not a mat-
ter of ‘if’ it will happen, but
‘when’ it will happen. It is up
to each one of us to be person-
ally responsible and prepared
and also to train others to take
appropriate action when the
time comes,” Vought stated.
To sign up to take the train-
ing class or be part of the di-
saster exercise, contact Ron
Vought at (515) 269-4665, af-
ter 3:30 p.m., or e-mail him at:
ron.vought@frontiernet.net.
CERT training planned for Dec. 3-8
Vista
Soup & Oyster
Crackers
12 oz pkg
Fareway
Chili Style Beans
15.5 oz can
(Limit 6)
69
¢
28
¢
(Limit 10 lbs)
$
2
49
85% lean 15% fat
Ground Chuck
LB
Regular or Diet
7up Products
all varieties
2 liter btl + dep
69
¢
Nabisco Crackers
Ritz 8-16 oz box
Snack Crackers 6.5-10 oz box
or Crackerfuls 6 ct box
Keebler Crackers
Club 11-16 oz box
Toasteds 8 oz box
all varieties
all varieties
Frito Lay
Sun Chips
9-10.5 oz pkg
or Rold Gold
Pretzels
7-16 oz pkg
GW Sugar
4 lb bag
Limit 1
3/$
5
$
1
28
Jimmy Dean
Sausage Rolls
all varieties
1 lb roll
2/$
4
$
1
88
6 pk 24 oz btls
+ dep
regular or diet
Pepsi or
Mountain Dew
Products
w
3/$
8
Mix & Match
all varieties
Betty Crocker
Cake Mix
15.25 oz box
Ready to Spread
Frosting
12-16 oz ctn
10/$
10
XTRA
Liquid Laundry
Detergent
all varieties
62.5-75 oz btl
$
1
88
ECONOMICAL
FOOD
STORES
copyright 2012
Friday & Saturday,
November 16 & 17
2-DAY
SALE!
Tony Christensen
DON’T OVERLOOK FINANCIAL RISKS IN RETIREMENT
When you retire, you may well have accomplished some
important financial goals, such as sending your children through
college and paying off your mortgage. Yet, you can’t relax just yet,
because your retirement could easily last two or three decades,
which means you’ll need at least two or three decades’ worth of
income — which, in turn, means you’ll need the proper savings
and investment strategies in place. And, just as importantly,
you’ll also need to be aware of the types of risk that could threaten
these strategies.
Let’s consider some of these risks:
• Longevity — None of us can say for sure how long we’ll live.
But it’s still important to have an estimate, based on your
health and family history. So if you think you may live, for 25
years in retirement, you’ll want to withdraw enough from your
investments each year to enjoy a comfortable lifestyle — but not
so much that you deplete your funds before the 25 years have
passed.
• Inflation — We’ve experienced pretty mild inflation over the
past few years. But over time, even a low rate of inflation can
seriously erode your purchasing power. To illustrate: If your
current monthly costs are $3,000, with only a 3 percent annual
inflation rate, that would be about $4,000 in 10 years. And in
25 years at that same rate, your monthly costs will have more
than doubled, to about $6,200. To help protect yourself against
inflation risk, it’s important to have at least some investments
that offer growth potential, rather than only owning fixed-
income vehicles, such as certificates of deposit (CDs). You’ll
also want to consider sources of rising income potential, such as
dividend-paying stocks. (Keep in mind, though, that stocks can
reduce or discontinue dividends at any time and are subject to
market fluctuation and loss of principal.)
• Market Fluctuations — When you retire and begin taking
withdrawals from your investment portfolio — that is, when you
begin selling off investments — you’d obviously like prices to be
high. After all, the classic piece of investment advice is “buy low,
sell high.” But it’s impossible to try to “time” the market this way,
as it will always fluctuate. That’s why you may want to consider
sources of income whose value is not dependent on what’s
happening in the financial markets. Your financial advisor may
be able to recommend investments that can provide you with this
type of income stream.
• Low interest rates — Many retirees depend on fixed-rate
investments for a good portion of their retirement income — so
it’s a real challenge when interest rates are low. Consequently,
when you retire, you’ll certainly need to be aware of the interest-
rate environment and the income you can expect from these
investments. Longer-term fixed-rate vehicles may be tempting,
as they typically offer higher rates than shorter-term ones, but
these longer term investments may have more price fluctuation
and inflation risk than shorter-term investments. Consequently,
you’ll still likely need balance between short, intermediate, and
long-term investments to provide for a portion of your income in
retirement.
Retirement can be a rewarding time in your life. And you
can help make your retirement years even more enjoyable by
understanding the relevant investment risks and taking steps to
address them.
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local
Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
530 Sumner Avenue • Humboldt, IA
515-332-2431 • 1-800-232-7897
IF YOU’RE NOT AT YOUR LAST JOB,
YOUR 401(k) SHOULDN’T BE EITHER.
To see why it makes sense to roll your 401(k) to Edward Jones, call today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Tony R Christensen
Financial Advisor
530 Sumner Ave.
Humboldt, IA 50548
515-332-2431
Humboldt Ordinance No. 69.11
ALL NIGHT PARKING
PROHIBITED
No person shall park any vehicle on any
street between the hours of 3:00 a.m. and
7:00 a.m. of any day during the months of
December, January, February, and March.
Ordinance No. 136.03
REMOVAL OF SNOW, ICE
AND ACCUMULATIONS
It is the responsibility of the abutting property
owners to remove snow, ice, and accumulations
promptly from sidewalks. If a property owner
does not remove snow, ice, or accumulations
within twelve (12) hours in commercial zoning
districts or within twenty-four (24) hours
in residential zoning districts, after such
accumulation occurs, the City may do so and
assess the costs against the property owner for
collection in same manner as a property tax.
The City shall serve notice of non-compliance
by first class mail or by posting such notice
conspicuously on the property only one time
during a snow season.
6A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
The Cook of the Week 3rd Edition Cookbook is now
on sale! Pick one up at
the front desk. $10.70
(includes tax)
($18.70 to mail)
Great gift
idea!
Cook of the W
eek
3rd E
dition
by Judy Konecne
Cook of the Week
HONORING THE AMERICAN LEGION AND
AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY
This past Sunday at 11 a.m., the country took time to remem-
ber our veterans and thank them for their sacrifice and service.
This is the second week of the “Cook of the Week” column’s
salute to Veterans Organizations.
This week we are spotlighting the Humboldt County Ameri-
can Legion Posts and their related organizations.
The American Legion was chartered by congress in 1919, as
an organization focused on service to veterans, service mem-
bers and communities. The nation’s largest wartime veterans’
service organization, the American Legion is committed to
mentoring youth and sponsorship of wholesome programs in
our communities, advocating patriotism and honor, promot-
ing strong national security, and continued devotion to service
members and veterans. Today there are over 2.4 million mem-
bers in 14,000 posts worldwide.
Also founded in 1919, and now at almost one million mem-
bers from all walks of life, the Auxiliary administers hundreds
of volunteer programs. It donates thousands of hours to its com-
munities and to veterans and raises millions of dollars to sup-
port its own programs and other worthwhile, familiar charities.
This is all accomplished with volunteers.
As the world’s largest women’s patriotic service organiza-
tion, the Auxiliary embodies the spirit of America that has pre-
vailed through war and peace. Through its nearly 10,500 units,
the Auxiliary and the American Legion stand behind America
and her ideals.
Adams Post #119 in Humboldt was formed and chartered
in 1919; the Auxiliary in 1925. Otto Field #415 in Livermore,
Cloverleaf #524 in Bode and Liest Veerkamp #525 in Ottosen
soon followed. (Post Hartnett-Johnson #239 in Gilmore City is
in Pocahontas County.) Most of the Posts have Auxiliaries, al-
though some may have dissolved. Livermore, however, has a
new Auxiliary that was chartered in September 2012.
The American Legion also has another branch, known as
The Sons of the American Legion (S.A.L.). Originally formed
in 1932, The Sons of the American Legion members include
males of all ages whose parents or grandparents served in the
U.S. military and were eligible for American Legion member-
ship. Livermore also has a chapter of The Sons of the American
Legion.
The following recipes have been taken from “Our Favorite
Recipes,” a cookbook that was sponsored by the American Le-
gion Auxiliary Adams Unit #119. (There is no date on the cook-
book, a best guess would be sometime in the 60s or early 70s.)
The recipes chosen are from ladies who are still members of the
Auxiliary.
Apricot Salad
Marian Nelson
1 can apricot pie filling
1 can mandarin oranges (cut
up and drained)
1 cup small marshmallows
1 small can crushed pineapple
(drained)
1/2 cup shredded coconut
Mix together and chill. Just
before serving, add sliced ba-
nana and some cut up mara-
schino cherries. The pie fill-
ing provides all the dressing it
needs.
Hearty Salad
Yvonne State
1 package lemon Jell-O
1 cup boiling water
8 ounce package cream cheese
1 cup grated carrots
1 can crushed pineapple
1 cup crushed walnuts
1/2 cup whipping cream
1 cup minced celery
Add boiling water to Jell-O
and stir until dissolved. Add
rest of ingredients and cool.
Porcupine Beef Balls
Alice Warner
1/2 cup uncooked rice
1 pound ground beef
1-1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 medium can tomato soup
1 egg
1 small onion, chopped
Combine rice, beef, salt,
pepper, egg, onion and 4 table-
spoons of soup. Mix thorough-
ly and form into balls. Place
in casserole and cover with
remaining soup. Bake, uncov-
ered, in moderate oven at 350
degrees about 1-1/2 hours. The
cover may be removed the last
15 minutes to allow to brown.
Corned Beef Noodle
Casserole
Gretchen Clay
10 ounce can corned beef
8 ounce package noodles
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 tall can condensed milk
1/4 pound Velveeta cheese
1 small onion, chopped
2 cups corn flakes
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 can water
Cook noodles and drain.
Break cheese into the soup and
milk and heat, stirring until
smooth. Add onion. Mix all
ingredients except corn flakes
together and place in long bak-
ing dish. Sprinkle corn flakes
over the top. Bake for 45 min-
utes at 350 degrees.
Baked Beans
Yvonne State
1 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 cup catsup
1 pound pork sausage
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 tablespoon Worcestershire
sauce
2 medium sliced onions
1 pound 5 ounce can pork and
beans
Combine pork sausage
with salt and pepper. Form
into balls and brown. Combine
all other ingredients, except
beans, and simmer until thick.
Pour sauce over meat balls and
simmer 5 minutes. Heat beans
until boiling. Pour into casse-
role, top with meatballs and
sauce mixture. Bake slowly
(275-300 degrees) for one
hour.
Date Pudding
Gretchen Clay
1 cup dates, cut up
1 cup boiling water
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup white sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon soda
1/2 cup walnuts
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1-1/2 cups flour
Mix dates, boiling water,
butter and set aside to cool.
Combine sugar, egg, soda,
baking powder, salt and flour.
Add to cooled date mixture
and beat thoroughly. Pour
into cake pan and cover with
brown sugar sauce. Bake in
350-degree oven about 30-35
minutes. Cool and serve with
whipped cream.
Brown Sugar Sauce:
1-1/2 cups brown sugar
1 tablespoon butter
1-1/4 cups boiling water
Mix together until sugar
dissolves and butter melts.
Never Fail Gingersnaps
Yvonne State, Caroline
Madsen
3/4 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
4 tablespoons molasses
1 egg
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon ginger
2 teaspoon soda
Cream shortening and
sugar. Add egg and cream un-
til fluffy. Add molasses, flour,
soda, cinnamon, cloves and
ginger.
Chill dough. Roll in balls
and roll in sugar. Place on
cookie sheet about 2 inches
apart. Bake at 375 degrees for
12-15 minutes. Cool on rack.
Basic Brownies
Laura Seiler
2/3 cup sifted flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup shortening
2 squares chocolate
1 cup sugar
2 eggs, well beaten
1/2 cup walnut meats, broken
1 teaspoon vanilla
Sift flour once, measure.
Add baking powder, salt and
sift again. Melt shortening
and chocolate. Add sugar to
eggs, beating thoroughly. Add
chocolate mixture and blend.
Add flour and mix well, then
add nuts and vanilla. Bake in
greased 8x8x2” pan in 350 de-
gree over 25 minutes or until
done.
Coconut Peanut Butter Bars
Marian Nelson
1 cup sifted flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup margarine
1/2 cup creamy or chunk style
peanut butter
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup flaked coconut
Grease a 9”x13” baking
pan. Sift together flour, baking
powder, and salt. Mix together
margarine, peanut butter and
sugar until blended. Stir in
eggs and vanilla, mixing well.
Stir in flour mixture, then co-
conut. Spread evenly in pre-
pared pan. Bake in 350 degree
oven for 20 to 25 minutes or
until top springs back when
lightly touched. Cut into bars.
Roll in confectioners’ sugar
while warm, if desired.
Cherry-Coconut Bars
Jean Eastman
Pastry:
1 cup flour
3 tablespoons confectioners’
sugar
1/2 cup oleo
Heat oven to 350 degrees.
With hands, mix flour, oleo
and sugar until smooth. Spread
thic k with fingers in 8” square
pan. Bake 25 minutes.
Filling:
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 cup chopped nuts
1/2 cup coconut
1/2 cup maraschino cherries,
quartered
Stir ingredients into eggs.
Spread over top of baked pas-
try (no need to cool pastry).
Bake 25 minutes. Cool and cut
into bars.
By Carolyn Saul Logan
For some, genealogy and
family histories are boring; just
names and dates and places.
However, interwoven in those
names and dates and places are
the stories that connect one’s
family to history. Then history
becomes personal.
Take the case of Mary Ann
Bodkin McCoy who lived in
Doe Hill, VA, at the time of
the Civil War. Her obituary
provides the first chapter in the
story of her experiences during
that war: “Her first husband
was Henry McCoy, who died
of smallpox in 1862, during
the Civil War, when the neigh-
borhood of Doe Hill was smit-
ten with that terrible scourge,
and she with her own hands,
helped to bury the dead, there
not being men enough at home
to bury the dead.” At the time
of her husband’s death, Mary
Ann was 51 years old and had
given birth to 13 children.
Smallpox deaths during
the Civil War were common.
Both Union and Confederate
Armies required their troops
to be vaccinated against small-
pox and re-vaccinated if nec-
essary. However, these regula-
tions were not always met and
as a result many new recruits
who had not been exposed to
the disease or had not been
vaccinated as civilians ended
up getting the disease and dy-
ing from it.
How did Henry McCoy
contract smallpox? He al-
most certainly was in contact
with the Union or Confeder-
ate troops who were both in
the area around Doe Hill. And
some of them had smallpox.
But the presence of troops
in Doe Hill robbed Mary Ann
not only of her husband. One
of her sons, Benjamin, had al-
ready joined the Union Army.
Then two of her remaining
three sons signed up with the
Confederate Army. One of
these, Henry by name, was
captured three days after he
joined up and died in a Fed-
eral prison. Andrew, her oldest
son, joined the 25th Virginia
Infantry Regiment. In 1863,
a year after his father’s death,
Andrew writes from Brandy
Station near Culpepper, VA,
where his regiment was dis-
mantling the Orange and Al-
exandria Railroad and sending
the iron to Richmond.
It is from Andrew’s let-
ters that we learn of another
financial loss for Mary Ann.
Andrew writes, “I was sorry
to hear of mother’s misfortune
and loss of her horses and the
great drawback it will cause
upon her with her work. But I
suppose from what I can learn
that there is no chance for her
ever to get them back again. It
is a great pity but what (could
she do). Also the thieving ras-
cals that taken them should
share the punishment that they
so justly deserve. I am also
ashamed to know that southern
men will be guilty of such dis-
graceful depredations on our
own people, especially a poor
helpless woman that is left in
her situation, but I hope that
such men will meet with the
doom that becomes such vil-
lains.”
Andrew angrily condemns
the “thieving rascals” but that
doesn’t help Mary Ann get her
horses back to work her farm.
In a letter written six months
later, Andrew gives us a clue as
to how Mary Ann worked out a
way to get the Confederates to
pay something for her loss. “I
got my barrel,” Andrew writes.
“There was seven cheeses in it
that Mother wanted me to sell
for her. I will try to sell them
to the best advantage and send
the money home to her.” At
least she would get some mon-
ey out of the thieving Confed-
erate rascals.
Mary Ann’s third son Ben-
jamin signed with the Union
Army in 1861, enlisting in the
Third West Virginia Volunteer
Infantry. At the end of nine
months’ service he was dis-
charged on account of disabili-
ty and set out to return home to
Doe Hill. His sympathy for the
Union cause was well known
and along the way he was at-
tacked by rebels as well as by
the guerrillas who infested that
section. According to the His-
tory of Hamilton County Iowa
1912, “When, only by exercis-
ing the utmost caution, he had
thwarted several of their plans
to shoot him, he deemed dis-
cretion the better part of valor
and concluded to leave that
part of the country.” Benja-
min went west and ended up
in Hamilton County, where he
farmed for many years and af-
ter his death was buried in the
Webster City cemetery.
Andrew survived the war
and returned to Doe Hill. He
predeceased his mother Mary
Ann and is buried in the same
cemetery as his father. It was
Mary Ann’s second son, Ben-
jamin, who was at her bedside
when she died at the age of 91.
The stories of these ordi-
nary people’s lives during the
Civil War make that terrible
struggle real and personal.
One can relate to the smallpox
that took Mary Ann’s husband,
the rebel raiding party that ran
off with her horses, the ideolo-
gies that drew two sons to the
Confederate cause and sent
one halfway across the con-
tinent to escape death for his
support of the Union.
Family trees can give the
dates but it is worth digging to
find out your family story in
history.
Cemetery in Doe Hill,
WV. Submitted photo.
Civil War hospital
for smallpox victims.
Submitted photo.
Finding your family story in history
CLIP And SAVE THIS FAMILY HOLIDAY
FREE MOVIE SCHEDULE!
Plan To Attend All 5 Weeks!
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MADAGASCAR 3
Europe’s Most Wanted
ICE AGE:
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Plus SUN, DEC. 2
At 12:00 Noon Only
HOW
THE
GRINCH
STOLE
CHRISTMAS
Jim Carrey
Dr. Seuss’
ARTHUR
CHRISTMAS
*FREE TICKETS
AVAILABLE AT THESE
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ADF SYSTEMS, LTD.
B&B SALES AND SERVICE
BANK IOWA
CHANTLAND-MHS CO.
CHANTLAND COMPANY
CINDY’S CHIROPRACTIC CENTER
COMPUTER WORKS AND VINYL
SIGNS
EDWARD JONES
ERPELDING, VOIGT, AND CO.
FAREWAY
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SERVICES
FIRST STATE BANK
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Happy Thanksgiving
There are many reasons to be thankful. Good
health, friends, and family often top the list.
Our staff is thankful to be able to work with our
customers and count many of them as friends.
We wish you all a happy holiday.
Card Shower
for our Mom
Marge Lenning
who turns 90 on
Thanksgiving day.
Please help us celebrate this
special lady who we are lucky
to have as our Mom.
Cards may be sent to:
1309 Oak Blvd., Humboldt,
IA 50548
Love You,
Becky & Ann
& the rest of the gang.
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 7A
Rachell Cruz Zarzoso and Mark Eugene Deling were
united in marriage June 11, 2012, in Laurens. The bride
is the daughter of Lemuel Zarzoso and Sonia Cruz of
the Philippines. The bridegroom is the son of Mark A.
and Sharon Deling of Humboldt. Following their wed-
ding the couple is at home in Laurens.
Rachell Zarzoso, Mark
Deling exchange vows
Weddings
JOSIE LINN
CHRISTOPHER
Mitchell and Deb Chris-
topher of Humboldt became
the parents of a daughter born
Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, at
Iowa Specialty Hospital, Clar-
ion. She has been named Josie
Linn and weighed 8 pounds 9
ounces. Grandparents are Rod-
ney and LuAnn Christopher
of Humboldt, and Mike and
Linda Josephson of Wyoming,
MN.
MASON LEE DAVIS
Justin and Jennifer Davis
of Herndon, KS, became the
parents of a son born Wednes-
day, Sept. 26, 2012, at Mc-
Cook, NE. He has been named
Mason Lee and weighed 7
pounds 8 ounces. Grandpar-
ents are Ron and Peach Beims,
Jeff Davis, and Shelly Davis.
Great-grandparents are Kermit
and Sharon Chantland.
MARGARET “MOLLY”
DILLANE GUENTHNER
AND MATTHEW JOSEPH
GUENTHNER
Dr. Scott and Shannon
Guenthner of Zionsville, IN,
became the parents of twins
born Sunday, Oct. 7, 2012, at
Indianapolis, IN. They have
been named Margaret “Molly”
Dillane and Matthew Joseph.
Molly weighed 5 pounds 1
ounce and Matthew weighed
4 pounds 14 ounces. They join
siblings, Evan, 8, Grace, 6, and
Katherine, 2, at home.
Grandparents are Mike and
Sue Powell of Carmel, IN, and
Jack and Ernestine Guenthner
of LeMars. Great-grandmother
is Anna Dillane of Indianapo-
lis, IN.
Births
The American Legion Aux-
iliary Adams Unit 119, Hum-
boldt, met on Monday, Nov. 5,
at 2 p.m., in the Dakota City
Town Hall.
Alice Warner, president,
called the meeting to order in
ritual form with six members
present, all of them officers.
Marian Nelson, secretary,
gave her report of the minutes
of the previous meeting, which
was approved as read.
Laura Seiler, treasurer,
gave her report, which will be
filed for audit.
The membership report
shows that there are 59 mem-
bers who have paid their dues
this year. This makes the Aux-
iliary a GOAL UNIT for 2012-
2013.
M. Myrton Skelley Certifi-
cates were given to the mem-
bers who helped with poppy
distribution held during Me-
morial Day in May.
The Auxiliary voted to send
a junior girl to Girl’s State in
June 2013.
The Auxiliary will hold its
Christmas party on Monday,
Dec. 10, at 2 p.m., in the Da-
kota City Town Hall. There
will be a $3 gift exchange and
a potluck lunch, with snacks
and finger food. Guests are
welcome.
American Legion
Auxiliary met Nov. 5
The Harmony Brigade provided music at the Veter-
an’s Day ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 11. The ceremony
Brian Scholl of the West Grove Hustlers and Erica
Lane of the Corinth Red Stars were recipients of the
Danford “I DARE YOU,” Award sponsored by the
American Youth Foundation. It was one of several
awards handed out last Sunday at the annual Humboldt
County 4-H awards banquet and foundation auction.
The award goes to young people who have demonstrat-
ed unusual integrity, balanced personal development
and a willingness to assume responsibility. They are rec-
ognized as emerging leaders of our communities. Brian
and Erica received a personalized certificate and a copy
of the personal motivation book “I DARE YOU.” For
more photos from the awards night, check out the up-
coming issue of the Humboldt Now! magazine. For all
of the Humboldt Independent photos, go to www.hum-
boldtnews.com and click the Buy A Photo link. Hum-
boldt Independent photo.
'I DARE YOU'
Award presented
As we gather to give thanks
and enjoy time with family and
friends, Thanksgiving tables
will take center stage. These
quick and beautiful center-
piece ideas may give you some
inspiration. Most of these can
be put together in 15 minutes
or less using ingredients from
your yard and the grocery
store.
The only trick may be
quantity. Instead of a pair of
candlesticks, use three pair.
Instead of one pumpkin, use
five. This will give a rich abun-
dant look with little expense.
Choose one and make some-
thing beautiful!
1. Candles and leaves
• candlesticks and candles
• preserved or fresh leaves
or branches
Arrange candlesticks (or a
variety of pillar candles) ran-
domly down the table, with
tallest ones in the center. Set
fall leaves on the tabletop
around the bases of the candle-
sticks. If you wish, decorate
with a few pinecones, min-
iature turkeys, or even foil-
wrapped chocolate turkeys.
Tip: When using fresh
leaves make sure they are not
moist so wood isn’t damaged.
To make the arrangement por-
table, set a tray underneath.
2. Potted green plant
• green plant (ivy is nice)
• fall leaves
• mini pumpkins
Choose one beautiful green
plant with trailing branches
such as an ivy. Place it in the
center of the table (in a basket,
cache pot, hollowed out pump-
kin, or even a soup tureen). In-
sert a few fall leaves into the
plant and add a few more down
the table. Nestle several mini
pumpkins either into the plant
or near the trailing vines.
Tip: If you have a large
pumpkin left from Halloween,
hollow it out and use it for a
unique and seasonal cachepot
for a potted plant. Be sure to
use a plastic water tray inside
the pumpkin (under the plant).
3. Pumpkin patch center-
piece
• 1 large pumpkin
• 2 medium pumpkins
• 2-4 small sugar pumpkins
• 6-10 mini pumpkins
• Fresh, silk, or preserved
fall leaves
Set the large pumpkin in
the center of the table with the
medium pumpkins on either
side, spaced about 4-8” apart.
Continue adding the smaller
pumpkins at each end, filling
in the spaces with mini pump-
kins and fall leaves.
Tip: Protect your table
from pumpkins by using plas-
tic circles or glass plates un-
derneath.
4. Votives and moss
• votive candles in glass
containers
• moss (dry or damp)
• preserved or fresh leaves
or branches
• twigs, small pinecones,
mini-pumpkins (optional)
Place a length of felt (if us-
ing dry moss) or plastic (for
damp moss) on the table. Lay-
er on moss, leaving a few open
areas for votive candleholders.
Decorate with fall leaves here
and there. Garnish with small
pinecones, twigs, or a few
mini-pumpkins. This is a low
arrangement that could also
be enhanced with taller pillar
candles or tall taper candles.
Tip: Use plastic under
damp sheets of moss to keep
your table clean and dry.
Tip: Keep dried materials
well away from candle flames.
5. Cedar forest
• small cedar potted plants
• preserved leaves
• moss
Purchase several miniature
evergreen trees (6-15” high)
from a florist or garden center.
Use these as your focal point.
Cover the pots with moss (at-
tach with hot glue or wire) or
place into decorative contain-
ers. Set the trees on the table
and garnish the tabletop with
fall leaves, votive candles, and
mini-pumpkins.
Tip: Arrange tallest tree(s)
in center. Always place fresh
plants on water trays, glass
plates, or in decorative con-
tainers to protect your table
from water damage.
Hint - This arrangement
can easily be updated to a
Christmas theme in December
by adding sparkling ribbons
and ornaments.
6. Cake plate and pump-
kin
• pumpkin (or assortment
of fall fruits)
• leaves, grapes, berries
Arrange one large pumpkin
(or assortment of fall fruits) on
a pedestal cake plate. Garnish
with small twigs of berries, ivy
strands, and a few fresh or pre-
served fall leaves. Hang a few
bunches of mini champagne
grapes over the edge of the
plate.
Tip: If necessary use heavy
toothpicks dipped in oil of
clove (available in a pharma-
cy) to help hold rolling fruits
together (oranges, apples, etc.)
The oil of clove or oil of cinna-
mon should make apples stay
fresh longer.
Tip: Use unusual fruit for
interest (pomegranates, fits,
kiwi, star, etc.) For another
way to use fall fruits, see our
One Bowl Arrangements.
7. Fall mums
• low growing fall mum
plants
• moss
• raffia
• votive candles
Place several small fall
mum plants in a grouping in-
side a large basket or in cache-
pots. Or, wrap the pots with
sheet moss and secure with
lengths of raffia. Or arrange
fall items around a mum plant
for a simple fall look.
Tip: Use a drip tray or plate
under the plant to catch any
water.
8. Glass and fruit
• clear glass container
• leaves
• colorful fruit (figs, limes,
persimmons, apples, pears)
Make a trip to the grocery
store and purchase a variety of
small colorful fall fruits such
as pears, figs, pomegranates,
persimmons, etc. Pile them
in a large glass bowl, vase,
or even inside of a tall glass
hurricane shade anchored to a
plate with florist clay. As you
layer in the fruit add a few fall
leaves here and there.
Tip: Use a variety of sizes
and colors for eye appeal.
was moved into VFW Post #5240 in Dakota City due to
inclement weather. Humboldt Independent photo.
Eight fast and easy
Thanksgiving centerpieces
OPEN BURNING OF LANDSCAPE WASTE
Open burning of landscape waste shall be allowed on the following days
from 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM:
Saturday, November 17, 2012
ALL FIRES SHALL BE CONSTANTLY ATTENDED UNTIL THE FIRE IS COMPLETELY
EXTINGUISHED AND A HOSE CONNECTED TO A WATER SUPPLY
SHALL BE READILY AVAILABLE.
NO BURNING SHALL BE ALLOWED ON CITY PROPERTY, INCLUDING STREET RIGHT-OF-WAY.
NO GARBAGE, PAPER, TIRES OR PROCESSED LUMBER SHALL BE BURNED
OR BE USED TO IGNITE ANY FIRE.
ARTS
& Crafts
SHOW
IOWA’S LARGEST
VARIED INDUSTRIES BLDG.
IOWA STATE FAIRGROUNDS
DES MOINES, IOWA
Fri. 5-9; Sat. 9-5; Sun. 10-4
ADM. Just $6.00
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FREE PARKING
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Over 300 Talented
Exhibitors Present & Sell
1,000’s of Unique
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O
ver
Bring this ad to show for $1.00 OFF One Admission
NOV. 16 - 18
Exhibitors
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A Fantastic shopping event.
for your continued
support.
Dean Kruger
Paid for by Dean Kruger, 1835 Quebec Ave., Hardy, IA 50545
THANK YOU
for your votes at the
General Election. I appreciate
your support.
~
Peggy J. Rice
Paid for by Peggy J. Rice
2340 Montana Ave., Dakota City
as seen in
Order high quality
photos as seen in the
Humboldt Independent,
plus see many more
unpublished photos.
Go to www.humboldtnews.com
and click on
8A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
RUTH M. BEHRENDS
1929-2012
Funeral services for Ruth
M. Behrends, 83, Humboldt,
were held Saturday, Nov. 10,
in the chapel of the Mason-
Lindhart Funeral Home, Hum-
boldt. Burial was in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Humboldt. She
died Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, at
Mercy Medical Center in Des
Moines.
The Mason-Lindhart Fu-
neral Home of Humboldt was
in charge of arrangements with
the Rev. Christy Ehrle officiat-
ing.
Ruth is survived by her
daughter, Dianna (Robert)
Helland of Oelwein; grand-
children, Scott (Sarah) Hel-
land of Cologne, MN, Jennifer
(Brent) Maddigan of Hudson,
WI, Angela Helland of Wood-
bury, MN, Ashley (Kris) Rech-
kemmer of Oelwein, Megan
(Derrick) Jefferson of Grimes,
Joshua Bradley of Fort Dodge,
and Shayla Bradley of Fort
Dodge; great-grandchildren,
Tyler Helland, Riley Maddi-
gan, and Makena Maddigan,
along with one on the way.
She is also survived by her
brother, Ralph (Betty) Larson
of Arnold, NE; and her son-in-
law, Thomas Bradley of Fort
Dodge. She was preceded in
death by her parents; daughter,
Cindy Bradley; granddaugh-
ter, Brianna Bradley; brothers,
Vern, Kenny, and Cecile; and
sisters, Catherine, Mary, and
Irene.
Ruth Margaret Larson,
daughter of Ollie and So-
phie Larson, was born May
18, 1929. She was raised
on a farm near Ayrshire and
graduated from Ayrshire High
School.
She was united in marriage
to Eugene E. Behrends on July
5, 1947, and the couple made
their home in the communi-
ties of Emmetsburg, Britt, and
Sioux City before moving to
Humboldt. In Humboldt, Ruth
worked for Woods Café, Na-
tional Grocery Store, Hy-Vee,
and The Humboldt Care Cen-
ter North.
Ruth was a member of
the Faith United Methodist
Church. She enjoyed garden-
ing and yard work and main-
taining her home. She also
enjoyed card playing, Bingo,
and trips to the casino. Above
all, Ruth loved her children,
grandchildren, and great-
grandchildren.
HELEN M. ROPTE
1918-2012
Funeral services for Helen
Marie Ropte, 93, Thor, will
be 2 p.m., Friday, Nov. 16,
at Good Shepherd Lutheran
Church in Fort Dodge. Buri-
al will be in Memorial Park
Cemetery, Fort Dodge. Visita-
tion is from 5-7 p.m., Thurs-
day at the Mason-Lindhart Fu-
neral Home in Humboldt. She
died Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, at
the Iowa Specialty Hospital in
Clarion.
The Mason-Lindhart Fu-
neral Home of Humboldt is in
charge of arrangements with
the Rev. Lyle Hansen officiat-
ing.
Helen is survived by her
sons, Marc of Thor, Tom of
Tecumseh, MO; daughters,
Susan (Tim) Brock of Moun-
tain Home, AR, and Mary
Lou (Tom) Hiltabidle of Eagle
Grove; grandchildren, Erika
(Forrest) Stolzer of Fayette-
ville, AR, Justin Brock of
Washington DC, Matthew
Hiltabidle of Webster City,
Arron Hiltabidle of Eagle
Grove, and Melinda Hiltabidle
of Boone; and sister, Maxine
Lage of Fort Dodge. She was
preceded in death by her par-
ents, husband, Arthur in 1991;
brother, Carl Brattmiller, Jr.;
and sisters, Irma Schultz, Lil-
lian Posegate, Minne Baker
and Delores Larson.
Helen Brattmiller, daughter
of Carl and Bertha (Rasch)
Brattmiller, was born Dec.
11, 1918, at her parents home
near Clare. Helen received her
education at Clare graduating
from high school in 1937. Dur-
ing high school she played on
the basketball team and con-
tinued to love sports her entire
life.
She was united in marriage
to Arthur Ropte June 8, 1941,
at the Trinity Lutheran Church
in Deer Creek Township, Web-
ster County. The couple lived
all of their married life in the
Thor area, where they farmed
for several years. Helen helped
many families in the Eagle
Grove and Thor area by being
one of the best housekeepers
in the area and she continued
working as a housekeeper until
she was over 80 years old.
She loved gardening (veg-
etable and flowers) and canned
many quarts even when she
was 90 years of age. Helen
was an avid Iowa Hawkeye
fan and attended many Iowa
football games. Helen was a
member of Good Shepherd
Lutheran C hurch and was very
active in the local churches by
being a Sunday school teacher,
attending Ladies Aide, sewing
at the Thor Church and many
other activities. Helen enjoyed
getting together with the wom-
en’s 500-card group, taking
long walks and watching John
Wayne movies.
INA L. CLOWES
1916-2012
Funeral services for Ina
Clowes, 96, Renwick, were
held Thursday, Nov. 8, at the
United Methodist Church in
Renwick. Burial was in El-
mwood Cemetery. Ina died
Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012, at the
Rotary Ann Nursing Home in
Eagle Grove.
Oakcrest Funeral Services
of Renwick were in charge of
arrangements with Reverend
Christina Perkins
officiating.
She is survived
by her children,
James Clowes and
wife Delores of
Hermitage, MO,
Robert Clowes
and wife Sherry
of Rochester, MN,
and Anne Conover
of Fair Oaks, CA;
daughters-in-law,
Jerilyn Clowes of Renwick
and Colette Clowes of Ti-
buron, CA; grandchildren,
Pamela Wiethoff, Cindy
Cambridge, Joni Clowes, Jill
Eltanal, Gavin Conover, Me-
gan Conover, Ryan Clowes,
and Shelley Brewer; and
great-grandchildren, Sydney
Wiethoff, Rosalee Eltanal,
Zachary Conover, Ethann and
Juliette Brewer. She was pre-
ceded in death by her parents;
husband, James Clowes on
April 22, 1956; two sons, Wil-
liam and David Clowes; two
sons-in-law, Edward Dostal
and Clifford Conover and a
brother, Clarence Hoovler.
Ina Lucile Hoovler, daugh-
ter of Francis Mason and Ad-
die Minerva (McPeak) Hoov-
ler, was born April 18, 1916,
near Spragueville. She gradu-
ated from Maquoketa High
School in 1933. She continued
her education at the Iowa State
Teachers College in Cedar
Falls. She taught in Andrew,
Renwick and Ver-
non Schools.
On Dec. 27, 1937,
Ina was united in
marriage to James
“Mac” Clowes in
Renwick. After
their marriage they
lived and farmed
near Renwick and
Ina later worked in
the Boone Valley
School system.
Ina had an avid interest
in genealogy, which led her
to join the Daughters of the
American Revolution and she
later served as the State Regent
in 1991 and 1992. She was
also a member of the Daugh-
ters of the American Colonies
and Mayflower Society and
the United Methodist Church.
Ina also enjoyed painting,
sewing, knitting, crocheting,
gardening, reading and writing
poetry.
Condolences may be left at
www.oakcrestfuneralservices.
com.
GAYLE L. FOTH
1944-2012
Memorial services for Gay-
le Foth, 67, Livermore, were
held Monday, Nov. 12, at Faith
United Methodist Church,
Livermore. She died Wednes-
day, Nov. 7, 2012, at the Paula
J Baber Hospice Home in Fort
Dodge.
The Lentz Funeral Home of
Livermore was in charge of ar-
rangements with Dee Coleman
officiating.
Left to cherish Gayle’s
memory is her hus-
band of 38 years,
Dick Foth; two
daughters, Stepha-
ni Hundertmark
and her husband,
Tom of Rutland,
and Laura Elsbeck-
er and her husband,
Mike of Algona;
three step-daugh-
ters, Diane Devin
of Livermore, Mary
Smith and her hus-
band Steve of Algona, and
Wendy Foth of Wesley; two
step-sons, Randy Foth and his
wife LaMona of Livermore,
and Robert Foth and his wife,
Julie of Livermore; a special
son, Todd Bakken of Minneap-
olis, MN; 26 grandchildren; 10
great-grandchildren; and three
sisters, Ellen Hofer and her
husband, Darold of Livermore,
Jan Newton and her husband,
Jim of Bode, and Mary Me-
kemson and her husband, Bill
of Ames. She was preceded in
death by her parents.
Gayle Louise Wilson,
daughter of Leonard “Sheeny”
and Marjorie (McClellan)
Wilson, was born on Dec. 12,
1944, in Fort Dodge. She grad-
uated from Twin
Rivers High School
in 1962. Gayle then
graduated from
Bernel Beauty
School.
On Dec. 3, 1973,
Gayle was united in
marriage with Rich-
ard Foth in South
Dakota. Gayle was
one of the origi-
nal founders of
Twin Rivers Sports
Boosters. She was a member
of Faith United Methodist
Church where she had served
as president and vice president
of the Church Board.
Gayle’s video tribute may
be viewed at www.lentzfuner-
alhome.com.
Obituaries
The 17th Annual Festival of
Trees will be “Making Spirits
Bright” Nov. 30 – Dec. 2, at
Opportunity Village in Clear
Lake. Proceeds from the Fes-
tival of Trees support services
for people with disabilities at
the non-profit Village.
More than 100 Christmas
trees, wreaths and swags of
all sizes are decorated by lo-
cal groups, individuals from
the community, and design
professionals. Festival visitors
can admire their handiwork
and buy an entire display with
decorations to take home after
the weekend. Delivery can be
arranged in the Mason City or
Clear Lake area for the larger
trees for a $25 fee.
The Festival of Trees will be
open from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday; 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday. General
admission to tree displays on
Saturday and Sunday is $2.
Tickets for Opening Night
and Breakfast with Santa
are available online at www.
fot2012.org, along with gen-
eral information about the Fes-
tival.
Dean Snyder Construction,
Stiffel Nicolaus, and Corpo-
rate Farmer are main sponsors
for the Festival.
All Festival events are held
at the Village, located north
of Fareway off Highway 18 in
Clear Lake.
Friday: The weekend gets
off to an elegant start with
“Opening Night” from 5 to 8
p.m., Friday, Nov. 30. Tickets
are $20 each for this gala eve-
ning, featuring hors d’oeuvres,
desserts, and live music by
Nonsemble from the Clear
Lake Arts Council. People
have been known to line up at
the door waiting for the 5 p.m.
opening just to get first crack
at picking out a tree. Buyers
Opportunity Village Festival of Trees
can pick up their trees Sunday
afternoon, so they remain on
display all weekend. Opening
Night is sponsored by Hy-Vee
East.
Saturday: On Saturday,
Dec. 1, the day starts early
with “Breakfast With Santa”
from 8 to 11 a.m. The Clear
Lake Knights of Columbus
#7898 will prepare a hearty
pancake breakfast. Tickets for
breakfast are $7 each or $4
for children 5 and under. This
includes general admission to
the tree displays. Santa will be
on hand Saturday morning to
share the excitement. Pictures
with Santa are $3 or you can
bring your own camera.
Santa’s Workshop and The
Secret Shop will be open from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday.
Santa’s Workshop offers free,
fun crafts for children. The Se-
cret Shop is for children only,
giving kids a chance to do
some Christmas shopping for
people on their lists. All items
will be priced between $3 and
$8, and elves will be on hand
to help select and wrap the se-
cret gifts.
Tree displays are open from
8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday.
Various musical entertain-
ment throughout Saturday
will enhance the hall of trees.
Sponsors for Saturday events
are CL Tel, Breakfast With
Santa; Lake Dental Associates,
Santa’s Workshop; and Master
Floors Carpet One, the Secret
Shop. Live musical enter-
tainment lends holiday spirit
throughout the day.
Sunday: Sunday, Dec. 2,
features a Cookie Walk with a
large selection of homemade
holiday cookies and candies
for sale. Visitors can hand-
select and purchase an assort-
ment of goodies by the boxful
for enjoyment at home. Boxes
are $10 or $14. The Cookie
Walk starts at 11 a.m. and runs
until sold out. The tree dis-
plays continue from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Sunday.
Other features of the week-
end include gift baskets for
sale and a “mystery box” sale.
Visit www.fot2012.org for
tickets and information on
the Festival of Trees. Tickets
also are available at the Village
General Store in Clear Lake or
at the event.
For more information about
the Festival of Trees, call Elda
Stone, 641-355-1241, or email
estone@oppvill.org. The Fes-
tival is part of a community
wide celebration “Christmas
b y the Lake.” For more infor-
mation about Christmas by
the Lake events, call the Clear
Lake Chamber of Commerce
at 641-357-2159.
Based in Clear Lake, Op-
portunity Village serves nearly
600 people with disabilities
throughout the northern part
of Iowa. All proceeds from the
Festival of Trees support this
non-profit agency’s work for
the local community.
Cahal Dunne is a songwrit-
er, masterful pianist, a come-
dian and one of Ireland’s best
vocalists.
Dunne will open the second
concert in the 2012-13 sea-
son for the Kossuth
County Concert As-
sociation on Tuesday,
Nov. 20, at 7:30 p.m.
in the O. B. Laing
Auditorium.
Doors will open
at 6:45 p.m. for as-
sociation members
and those with reci-
procity tickets will be
seated after 7:20 p.m.
On his second tour
for Allied Concerts,
Dunne has appeared with Bob
Hope, Wayne Newton, Al
Martino and Tony Orlando, as
well as performing for several
presidents.
He is his own accompanist
on the piano but has backing
tracks on 50 percent of his
songs, giving his audience the
sound of a full orchestra com-
ing from the stage.
He is a native of Cork, Ire-
land, and received a Bachelor
of Music Degree from
the University Col-
lege of Cork. The
winner of Ireland’s
National Song Con-
test with “Happy
Man,” it gave Dunne
the right to represent
Ireland in the Interna-
tional Eurovision Mu-
sic Contest in Israel.
“Happy Man” be-
came No. 1 on the
music charts in Eu-
rope and Ireland.
An entertainer extraordi-
naire, Dunne has a great sense
of humor, along with a rich
and deep vocal style that takes
you on a musical journey to his
homeland.
Cahal Dunne
Irish singer performs
in Algona
We would like to thank everyone for all their cards, sharing, car-
ing hugs, food and memorials for our mom, grandma and great
grandma Bernadine Kissinger. Thanks to Don Connor for being
with us and for such a great service and the Congregational Circle
for serving lunch. We also want to thank all personnel with Trinity
Hospice and Lincoln, Leroy, Russ and Tom with Mason Lindhart
Funeral Home as you guided us through this time. Memorials for
Bernadine will be made to the Historical Society, Trinity Hospice,
Lakeside Golf Course, Humboldt Parks & Rec, KGYL and the
Congregational Church.
Thank You
Bob & Shirley Aure & families
Denny & Mary Kissinger & families
Merlin & Cheryl Graaf & families
Thank You
The family of Beth Swan wishes to thank all the friends,
neighbors and family for your visits, cards and phone calls to Mom
during her illness. Thanks also to the private caregivers and the Hos-
pice staff for your tender care. We also appreciate all the food, ex-
pressions of sympathy and kindness shown to us at the time of her
passing. Thank you to Lincoln Mason and his staff for their guidance
and quality service; to the Historical Association members and the
Congregational Church members for serving the luncheon. Thank
you to any and all who brought sunshine to Mom's last months of life.
Myral Gilson family, Mychael Swan family, Marshall Swan family
Our Heartfelt Thanks ...
... for all who extended comforting
sympathy and help in our recent sorrow.
For the beautiful service,
foral oferings, and other kindnesses,
we are deeply grateful!
Te family of Bob Gray
.
Do so with a new career
From caring for children to
keeping roads safe, you will
find all types of job listings in
the Classifieds that will allow
you to make a difference.
Start your search today!
TO ERR IS HUMAN
Advertisers are requested to
check the first appearance of
want ads for corrections. The
Humboldt Independent will be
responsible for only one day if
we are in error. Call 332-2514.
I-35-tf
NOTICE: Be kind to animals.
Adopt a pet at the Humboldt
County Humane Society,
Humboldt, IA, 332-3087 or
332-2424. Pet lost??? Call the
Humane Society. I-15-tf
Classifieds
WANTED
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 9A
WANTED WANTED NOTICE
PROFESSIONAL DRIV-
ERS WANTED. Good steady
freight. Excellent home time.
Consistent miles. Two weeks
vacation after the first year.
Excellent benefit package.
No touch van freight. Con-
tact: Oberg Freight Co., Fort
Dodge, IA. 888-739-5220 ext.
2. 515-955-3592 ext. 2. www.
obergfreight.com. I-26-1x
ROFFLER FAMILY HAIR
Center in Dakota City will be
closed Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 23-24. (515) 332-3234.
I-26-1x
FREE Training! Tile Setting
(Immediate Openings), Con-
struction and More! Young
Women and Men, Ages 16-
24. Job Placement Assistance,
Free Room and Board. Call
Today! 515-281-9685. recruit-
ing.jobcorps.gov. (INCN)
THE IOWA DEPARTMENT
OF TRANSPORTATION is
seeking applicants to fill tem-
porary winter maintenance po-
sitions. Salary $11.28 - $15.97/
hour. Please apply at www.io-
wadot.gov/jobs. (INCN)
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for hands on Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if quali-
fied- Job placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance. 1-866-783-
0458. (INCN)
HIRSCHBACH OFFERS
experienced CDL A drivers
guaranteed weekly home time,
$.99 fuel for lease ops, new
equipment, practical mile pay,
and lots of miles. 888-474-
0729. (INCN)
DRIVER - $0.03 enhanced
quarterly bonus. Get paid for
any portion you qualify for:
safety, production, MPG,
CDL-A, 3 months current OTR
exp. 800-414-9569. www.
driveknight.com, (INCN)
DRIVERS - $6,000 Sign-
On, straight-up payout $500/
month! $1,100 per week.
Dedicated Lanes. Premium-
Free Family Health Insur-
ance; 5cpm value. Additional
Bonuses; 4cpm value. 888-
598-0783, sharkeydrivingjobs.
com. (INCN)
“YOU GOT THE DRIVE, We
have the Direction” OTR Driv-
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EZ-pass passenger policy.
Newer equipment. 100 percent
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(INCN)
Drivers: NO EXPERIENCE?
Class A CDL Driver Training.
We train and Employ! Expe-
rienced Drivers also Needed!
Central Refrigerated (877)
369-7895. www.centraltruck-
drivingjobs.com. (INCN)
JOIN THE SCHILLI Compa-
nies New Pay Package!! Van
and Flatbed Positions, Class
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(INCN)
ATTEND COLLEGE ON-
LINE from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Criminal Justice,
*Hospitality. Job placement
assistance. Computer avail-
able. Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV authorized. Call
888-220-3960. www.Centura-
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ACCESS ADVERTISING on
job openings, events in your
area or the newest business
opportunities at www.cyber-
shopper.org, a unique online
marketplace at your fingertips.
(INCN)
PREGNANT? Considering
Adoption? Call us First! Liv-
ing expenses, housing, medi-
cal and continued support
afterwards. Choose adoptive
family of your choice. Call
24/7. Adopt Connect. 1-866-
743-9212. (INCN)
TO ERR IS HUMAN
Advertisers are requested to
check the first appearance of
want ads for corrections. The
Humboldt Independent will be
responsible for only one day if
we are in error. Call 332-2514.
I-35-tf
A.I. PROCESSORS is currently interested in hiring for the following position.
Full-time Production Workers: New starting wage of $13.00 with 50¢
increase after ninety days. We offer 75¢ shift differential with three and
four day weekends. Overtime as needed.
Benefits include eight paid holidays, medical and dental insurance,
sick and personal days, short and long term disability, and 401K. Pre-
employment drug screening required.
Apply in person at A.I. Processors in Whittemore, Iowa.
DAYCARE
OPENINGS
in my home.
Call 515-368-0110
Hagie Manufacturing Company
721 Central Ave. West • Clarion, Iowa 50525
Email: csherwood@hagie.com
What we are thankful for at Hagie; a company that cares,
a challenging job, advancement opportunities, a plethora
of benefits, and most of all…the best employees ever! Are
you thankful for what you have today? If not, it’s time to
check us out.
Current Openings:
2nd Shift Welders1st and 2nd Shift Painters
2nd Shift Manufacturing Dept. Manager
Web & Application Developer
Service Department Manager
Engineering Positions
Check out the 11th ranked Top Workplace in Iowa for 2012 at
www.hagiecareers.com or call 515-532-2861 TODAY.
Voyager Industries, Inc., a growing contract
manufacturer has an excellent opportunity for a
Shop Manager.
Required job skills.
• Excellent organizational and leadership skills.
• Knowledge of stainless steel, mild steel and
aluminum welding techniques.
• Knowledge of industrial equipment such as
brake press, shear, saws, drills, lathe, and mill.
• Ability to read and understand blueprints.
• Five years experience in metal fabrication.
• Minimum two years supervisory experience.
• Excellent verbal and written communication
skills.
• Computer skills with a working knowledge of
Excel and Outlook.
Please stop in at 1303 22nd Street North,
Humboldt, IA to fll out an application.
Help Wanted
Opening at a Finisher near You!
Team Atmosphere
Regular Hours
Advancement Possibilities
Full Benefit Package
Full-time
For information:
712-852-8550
jobs@kerbermilling.com
www.kerbercompanies.com
EEO-Pre-employment drug screen required
11 8285 MF 330H FRT Duals .......................... JUST IN
11 8285 MF 423H IVT .................................. $201,900
10 5065E MF 25H W/LDR ............................. JUST IN
09 9330 4WD PTO ..................................... $217,500
09 8130 MF 1885H...................................... $144,900
07 9620 4WD 1925H................................... $201,900
02 9220 4WD 3670H................................... $129,900
97 8300 MF 46” DLS ...................................$83,900
96 8100 3012H 2WHL ............................JUST IN
92 2955 Cab MWR.................................$22,500
90 8960 4WD 24SPD 42” DLS ................JUST IN
90 8760 4WD 5941H .............................$49,900
89 4755 MF PS 42” DLS ........................$45,900
82 4640 QR 42”D ..................................$23,900
76 4630 38” R .......................................$14,900
05 9760 1483H 42” DLS
04 9760 1785H 42” DLS
03 CIH 2388 1720H
01 9650 1975H 38” DLS
00 9650 2050H 42” DLS
00 9650W 1785H 38” DLS
85 8820 30.5R 4WD .........................$19,900
USED 635 Platforms ..............................SAVE
USED 893 CHDS ....................................SAVE
PRK 605 22.5R ......................................... $13,500
J&M 500 Bu ............................................... $7,250
NEW BRT 644 ................................................ SAVE
08 KAW 750A 135H 4x4 .....................$7,995
New 3720 MF & Ldr ...............................SAVE
JD 1760 12N 3bu RC ................................ $32,900
JD 1770 16N 3bu RC NDDO ......................... $38,900
JD 1720 12N 3bu RC ................................ $23,000
KNZ 2600 16/31 ....................................... $39,900
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CIH 4300 42’ 3 bar ................................... $13,900
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SKIDLOADERS & MISC.
11 JD 326D Cab 72”................................. $53,250
10 JD 328D Cab 76”................................. $36,500
10 JD 329T 275H 84”............................... $54,500
09 JD 315 60”.......................................... $19,500
07 BC 250 Cab 76”................................... $25,900
07 JD 320 Cab 72”................................... $25,900
06 BC 300 Cab 66”................................... $25,200
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10A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
Cort Kallansrud and his family
of Humboldt were special guests
of ISU Athletic Director Jamie
Pollard at the ISU homecoming
football victory over Baylor on
Oct. 27.
One of the special guests Cort
got to meet was Seneca Wallace,
former ISU quarterback and cur-
rent NFL free agent.
He also got to meet the Cy-
clone mascot, Cy.
Pollard invited Kallansrud to
be his guest in his suite after meet-
ing Cort at the Cyclone Tailgate at
Rustix last summer.
“They loved it. Jamie Pollard
was busy and we weren’t able to
see him, but Iowa State won the
game and we all had fun,” Cort’s
mother, Emily Rees said.
Cort and his cousins, Daven
and Hanah Rees, all had footballs
autographed by Seneca Wallace.
Iowa State kept the footballs and
is getting more autographs before
they send them back to Humboldt.
Cort is a sixth grader at Hum-
boldt Middle School who just
turned 12. He’s missed a lot of
school this year as he continues
to fight a build up of fluid in his
stomach.
A benefit was held last Feb-
ruary at Taft Elementary to help
send Cort to Boston for special
treatment.
He had a procedure called
sclerotherapy twice. During
sclerotherapy doctors inject medi-
cine into his kidneys to try to
shrink the disease and reduce the
seepage.
He returns to Boston on Jan.
24 for more sclerotheraphy and
for further testing for his thoracic
duct.
“If he’s a candidate for thorac-
ic duct treatment, which we hope
he is, then it could solve the fluid
problem,” Rees said.
She said Cort continues to
miss lots of school this year be-
cause as the fluid is drained, he
loses sodium and ends up having
to be hospitalized to get his so-
dium levels back up.
“We are hopeful they will be
able to do the thoracic duct treat-
ment. And then maybe he can get
the tube out (used to drain the flu-
id) and get his hernias taken care
of,” Rees said.
“He loves sports and wants
to participate so bad. But if
something would happen to that
tube….it’s his lifeline.”
The trip to the Iowa State
game was sandwiched around
hospital stays for Cort, but served
as a spirit booster for him.
“He wants so badly to be like
everyone else. Cort had a great
Cort Kallansrud and his cousins, Daven and Hanah,
are pictured with Cyclone mascot, Cy, at a recent ISU
football game.
Former ISU quarterback and current NFL free agent
Seneca Wallace is pictured with Cort Kallansrud (front
right) and Cort’s cousins, Daven and Hanah. They were
special guests of ISU Athletic Director Jamie Pollard at
the ISU football victory against Baylor on Oct. 27.
time at the game. We are very ap-
preciative to Jamie Pollard and
Iowa State,” Rees said.
“Cort is a very special boy and
I am so glad we were able to pro-
vide him a small break from his
daily struggles. I am truly inspired
by his courage and have been im-
pressed by his positive attitude on
life. We will continue to pray for
Cort and his family as they work
to overcome his medical challeng-
es,” Jamie Pollard, ISU Athletic
Director, said.
Cort Kallansrud at ISU
the president’s column, on his
way to re-election.
Of the nine “swing states,”
Obama took eight by narrow
margins with Romney claim-
ing only the 15 electoral votes
in North Carolina.
Pundits credited Obama’s
win being due to stronger vot-
ing margins among women,
minorities and younger voters.
King topped challenger
Christie Vilsack in newly
drawn U.S. Senate District
4, which includes portions of
northern, western and central
Iowa. King tallied 2,958 votes
in Humboldt County to Vil-
sack’s 1,978, according to the
unofficial totals. Statewide,
King received 53 percent of the
vote, just under 200,000, while
Vilsack received 168,323.
State Rep. Tom Shaw, a
Laurens Republican, was re-
elected running unopposed in
District 10, which includes all
of Humboldt, Pocahontas and
Calhoun counties, along with a
small portion of western Web-
ster County. Shaw received
3,992 votes in Humboldt
County and 12,324 overall.
Most of the county races
were uncontested. The one
contested race for District 4
Humboldt County Supervisor
found Democratic incumbent
John “Mort” Christianson
of Bode topping Republican
challenger Randy R. Foth of
Livermore by a total of 567-
397, unofficially.
Other Supervisor candi-
dates, Harlan Hansen, Rick
Pedersen and Jerry Haverly,
were running unopposed and
were elected to office. Peder-
sen will be the lone new super-
visor to join the board Jan. 1.
Other county officeholders
Dean Kruger (sheriff), Peggy
Rice (auditor) and Jonathan
Beaty (county attorney) were
all running unopposed and
were elected, all receiving
over 4,000 votes.
Tim Anderson, Rod
Harklau and Scott Curran were
elected to the Humboldt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital Board
of Trustees. Robert Lynch,
Tim Terwilliger, Put Hill and
Max Redenius were elected as
Humboldt Soil and Water Dis-
trict Commissioners.
There were six people
vying for four spots on the
Humboldt County Agricul-
ture Extension Council. Larry
Lane, Jeffery Goodell, Jenna
Bormann and Dee Diana Stern
were the top vote getters, out-
polling Marilyn Stein and Cas-
sandra Smith. Will Spellmeyer
was also elected to fill an un-
expired term on the Extension
Council.
There were contested races
for two city council seats in
area towns.
In Gilmore City, it appears
that former councilman Tim
Smith will be back on the
council. Unofficial totals show
Smith with 59 votes to 56 for
Denny Davis and 14 for Cleo
Boles.
In the city of Livermore,
Crista Jensen outpolled
George McMahon to fill an
unexpired term. Jensen had 98
votes to 61 for McMahon.
Humboldt County voters
turned down re-electing Iowa
Supreme Court Justice David
Wiggins by nearly 700 votes,
2,468 against to 1,775 in fa-
vor. Statewide however, Wig-
gins was re-elected, 670,013
in favor to 556,782 against.
Supreme court justices Bruce
Zager, Thomas Waterman and
Edward Mansfield were also
re-elected, as were all of the
Court of Appeals and 2B Dis-
trict Court judges and associ-
ate judges.
In Kossuth County vot-
ers selected Democrats in the
State Senate District 4 and
State Representative District
7 races, Bob Jennings and
John Wittneben. Both can-
didates lost when all coun-
ties were counted. Jennings,
of Algona, was defeated by
Kanawha farmer Dennis Guth,
53 percent to 47 percent. Ted
Gassman, a Scarville farmer,
defeated Wittneben, an Es-
therville land surveyor, by the
thinnest of margins, 7,646 to
7,589.
In State Rep. District 8,
Henry Rayhons of Garner
was re-elected, running unop-
posed.
Two supervisor districts
were on the ballot in Kossuth
County. Democrat Jack Plathe
was running unopposed in
District 2, and won with 1,399
votes. In District 5, Republic
Roger Tjarks topped Democrat
Thomas Johnson by more than
300 votes.
Incumbent Kossuth County
Auditor Amber Garman and
County Sheriff Steve Kollasch
were both running unopposed,
and were re-elected.
Rural residents of Kossuth
County also renewed a Local
Option Sales Tax by a vote of
57 percent in favor.
In local races, Sara Cur-
tis and Harley Kohlhaas were
running unopposed for the Al-
gona City Council, and both
were elected. Alan Miller was
running unopposed as mayor
of Fenton. For the Fenton City
Council, Paul Jorgenson edged
Ryan Harms, 81-74.
Strong turnout
With more than 5,000 votes
locally for president, it was a
strong turnout.
Humboldt County Auditor
Peggy Rice reported that 5,184
Humboldt County citizens vot-
ed, of the 7,033 registered, or
73.7 percent. That slightly tops
the percentage for the 2008
general election, when 5,161
voters of 7,076 registered cast
ballots, for 72.9 percent par-
ticipation.
Final party affiliation tal-
lies weren’t available because
of same-day registrations. Just
prior to the election, of the
6,985 registered voters in the
county, 40 percent declared no
party, 38 percent were regis-
tered Republicans and 22 per-
cent Democrats.
Rice reported few glitches
with the election last week de-
spite some long lines at some
of the voting precincts.
“Voters were very accom-
modating and understanding.
We had a few people show up
at their former voting sites,
which had changed in some
cases because of the Supervi-
sor redistricting. We will work
on ways to better inform the
public on changes. I think
posting the maps in public li-
braries or city halls might be a
good idea,” Rice said.
The auditor said the vol-
untary scanning of driver’s
licenses or voter registration
cards worked well in helping
to speed up the process .
“The only precinct where
we didn’t use the scanners was
the Bode Precinct,” Rice said.
She said there has been no
case of voter fraud in Hum-
boldt County at any time in
recent memory. Only four pro-
visional ballots were cast last
Tuesday and three of those
were because late registrants
didn’t have an ID with them.
Absentee ballots continue
to gain popularity among vot-
ers. In Humboldt County,
2,130 people voted absentee,
compared to just over 1,800 in
2008.
Rice said the five-member
special elections precinct
board that counts the absentee
ballots places all of the secre-
cy sleeves in one pile and the
election ballots in another after
envelopes are discarded, so the
voter’s identity remains secret.
“We had fairly steady turn-
out of people voting (in our of-
fice) prior to the election and
on the Monday prior to elec-
tion day,” Rice said.
The auditor said a record-
ing tape at the Gilmore City
precinct would not print out,
but the ballots were all count-
ed and when the machine and
reader card were brought to
the auditor’s office, the tape
from the machine printed fine.
Rice said the auditor’s of-
fice has to keep abreast of any
federal or state changes in
election law.
While she doesn’t expect
any bold changes, her office
has to be able to adapt and let
the public know.
Humboldt County General Election Results •
• Unofficial totals—official totals will be released after
a canvass by the Board of Supervisors after press time on
Nov. 13.
President/Vice President Votes
Mitt Romney - Paul Ryan R 3,099
Barack Obama - Joe Biden D 1.967
Virgil Goode - James Clymer
Constitution 11
Jill Stein - Cheri Honkala
Iowa Green 13
Gary Johnson - James P. Gray
Libertarian 23
Gloria LaRiva - Stefanie Beacham
Party for Socialism/Liberation 2
James Harris - Alyson Kennedy
Socialist Workers 2
Jerry Litzel - Jim Litzel
Nominated by Petition 7
U.S. Representative District 4 Votes
Steve King R 2,958
Christie Vilsack D 1,978
Martin James Monroe NP 132
State Representative District 10 Votes
Tom W. Shaw R 3,992
Board of Supervisors District 1 Votes
Harlan G. Hansen R 878
Board of Supervisors District 3 Votes
Rick Pedersen R 736
Board of Supervisors District 4 Votes
Randy R. Foth R 397
John Mort Christianson D 567
Board of Supervisors District 5 Votes
Jerry R. Haverly D 709
County Auditor Votes
Peggy J. Rice R 4,422
County Sheriff Votes
Dean A. Kruger R 4,573
County Attorney Votes
Jonathan Beaty R 4,083
To fill vacancy
Avery Township Trustee (one) Votes
Martin Brown 57
Beaver Township Trustee (two) Votes
Dale R. Thompson 87
Dave Torkelson 114
Corinth Township Trustee (two) Votes
Marvin Lindemann 160
Delana Township Trustee (two) Votes
Norman Olson 64
Clifford Helland 68
Grove Township Trustee (two) Votes
Will Spellmeyer 113
Robert A. Johnson 96
Humboldt Twp. Trustee (two) Votes
(No declared candidates)
Lake Township Trustee (two) Votes
(No declared candidates)
Norway Township Trustee (two) Votes
Clayton Hansen 87
Mark W. Holtan 88
Rutland Township Trustee (two) Votes
Steve Gregory 132
Mike Ludwig 117
Vernon Township Trustee (two) Votes
William A. Nielsen 42
Roger Schipull 55
Wacousta Twp. Trustee (two) Votes
(No declared candidates)
Weaver Township Trustee (two) Votes
Randy Davis 46
Rodney Ahlrich 44
Weaver Township Clerk (one) Votes
(To fill vacancy, no declared candidates)
HCMH Board of Trustees (three) Votes
Timothy P. Anderson 3,126
Rodney Lee Harklau 3,152
Scott Curran 3,376
Soil and Water Commission (three) Votes
Robert Lynch 2,981
Tim Terwilliger 3,130
Pat Hill 3,139
Soil & Water Commission (two) Votes
Max Redenius 3,602
(To fill vacancy)
Humboldt Co. Ag. Ext. Co. (four) Votes
Larry Lane 2,509
Jeffery R. Goodell 2,453
Jenna Bormann 2,192
Dee Diana Stern 1,626
Marilyn Stein 1,493
Cassandra Smith 1,262
Humboldt Co. Ag. Ext. Co. (one) Votes
Will Spellmeyer 3,540
Iowa Supreme Court Yes No
Thomas D. Waterman 2,709 970
David S. Wiggins 1,775 2,468
Bruce B. Zager 2,607 968
Edward Mansfield 2,667 955
Iowa Court of Appeals Yes No
Michael R. Mullins 2,706 739
Mary Ellen Tabor 2,648 773
Anuradha Vaitheswaran 2,364 1,027
District Court Judges 2B Yes No
Kurt John Stoebe 3,536 659
Kurt L. Wilke 2,878 752
Steve J. Oeth 2,613 798
Dale E. Ruigh 2,600 803
Dist. Co. Assoc. Judges Yes No
Lawrence E. Jahn 2,602 771
Kim M. Riley 2,666 722
Paul B. Ahler 2,644 742
Angela L. Doyle 2,686 742
Gilmore City Council (one) Votes
(To fill vacancy)
Tim Smith 59
Denny Davis 56
Cleo Boles 14
Livermore City Council (one) Votes
(To fill vacancy)
Crista Jensen 98
George McMahon 61
Election Results from front page
Several motor vehicle acci-
dents have been reported to the
Humboldt County Sheriff’s Of-
fice (HCSO) during the past two
weeks.
On Friday, Nov. 2, a Renwick
Ambulance backed into a pickup
truck as it was exiting the scene of
a previous accident.
According to the report, a 2000
Chevrolet Ambulance belonging
to the city of Renwick, and driven
by Jon A. Nissen, 57, Corwith,
was parked on the east shoulder of
Highway 17, facing north. Nissen
reportedly backed up to exit and
struck a 2000 Dodge Ram pickup
belonging to Devon B. Anderson,
Clarion.
There was an estimated $200
damage to the ambulance and an
estimated $1,200 to the front end
of the Dodge pickup.
There were no injuries and no
charges were filed.
A single-vehicle accident was
reported on Saturday, Nov. 3, at
12:05 a.m.
The accident occurred 1-1/2
miles north of Humboldt on 210
th
Street, about one-half mile east of
Nevada Avenue.
According to the report,
Thomas F. George , 23, Hardy,
said he swerved to miss a deer and
put his 2001 Ford F-150 pickup in
the north ditch. The vehicle was
facing east, landing on the driver’s
side door.
George was not injured.
There was an estimated $2,500
damage to the left front side of
George’s pickup.
George was charged with fail-
ure to maintain control.
A vehicle/deer accident was
reported Wednesday, Nov. 7, at
5:50 p.m. The accident occurred
on County Road C-20, about one-
half mile west of Livermore.
According to the report, a
1993 Honda Accord driven by
Daniel D. Connors, 18, Bode, was
westbound when a deer ran into
the path of his vehicle.
The deer was killed. There
was an estimated $1,000 minor
damage to Connors’ Honda.
Connors was not injured.
A two-vehicle accident was
reported on Sunday, Nov. 11, at
5:30 p.m. The accident occurred
on Main Street in Dakota City, at
the intersection of 6
th
Street.
According to the report, a
2000 Buick LeSabre driven by
Kenneth L. Robinson, 83, Hum-
boldt, was westbound on Main
Street. A 2005 Chrysler 300
driven by Thomas P. Mersch, 16,
Gilmore City, was stopped at the
stop sign at Sixth Street South and
was proceeding to make a left turn
onto Main Street when Mersch’s
Chrysler struck the rear driver’s
side of Robinson’s Buick. The two
drivers exchanged information.
There was an estimated $400
damage to Robinson’s Buick and
an estimated $1,000 damage to
Mersch’s Chrysler.
There were no injuries and no
charges were filed.
A property-damage accident
was reported in Dakota City on
Monday, Nov. 12, at 4:28 p.m.
According to the report, a
2009 Toyota Camry driven by
Sarah L. Harvey, 28, Humboldt,
was traveling north on 2
nd
Street
South. A 2003 Dodge Caravan
van driven by Cindy S. Jacobs,
46, Humboldt, was backing out
of a driveway and did not see the
Harvey vehicle, causing a colli-
sion.
There was an estimated $2,000
damage to the right front of the
Toyota and an estimated $1,000
damage to the rear of the Dodge
van.
There were no injuries and no
charges were filed.
In other news:
Nov. 5
4:34 p.m.—A deputy assisted
getting some cattle in from the
2700 block of 260
th
Street.
Nov. 6
3:06 p.m.—A burglary alarm
was reported at One More Tavern
in Renwick. There was no bur-
glary. It was an employee from
the game machine company who
did not know the access code.
2:59 p.m.—A Fort Dodge man
reported a break-in in the county.
3:50 p.m.—The VFW Post
in Dakota City reported a theft.
While the establishment was
open, two unidentified males re-
portedly took cash from a vending
machine.
Nov. 7
12 a.m.—An ambulance was
requested in Thor for an elderly
female with a possible broken leg.
11:55 a.m.—A Humboldt
woman reported her daughter,
who lives in Dakota City, missing.
6:04 p.m.—A car/deer acci-
dent was reported at the entrance
to Lotts Creek Park, rural Liver-
more.
7:45 p.m.—Received a report
of glass and metal on Highway
3 near Satern’s Tire Service and
B&N Auto.
No time given—An aban-
doned truck was reported in a field
in the 1700 block of Elm Avenue,
rural Bradgate.
Nov. 8
8:21 a.m.—Rick Skow of
Corn Belt Power Cooperative
called in reference to a building
being broken into.
11:30 a.m.—A skidloader was
reported on fire in the 1300 block
of 220
th
St., Gilmore City.
11:18 a.m.—A welfare check
was requested for a Bode man.
The man was not answering his
door or his phone, but everything
was OK.
Nov. 9
10:35 a.m.—Big John’s in
Bode reported a break-in.
7:28 p.m.—Callers in Liver-
more reported harassment and
verbal threats. The HCSO had
warned the alleged violator be-
fore. The HCSO subsequently ar-
rested Randy Foth of Livermore
and charged him with disorderly
conduct, a simple misdemeanor.
He was released with a promise to
appear in court.
1:43 p.m.—The Livermore
city clerk reported a small brown
and white dog running loose. Ani-
mal control was informed but not
immediately available to pick up
the animal.
4:58 p.m.—A loose dog was
reported on a deck in Livermore.
Animal control was notified.
8:50 p.m.—A civil/child cus-
tody issue was reported in Liver-
more. A deputy spoke with both
parties. The situation was unre-
solved with the deputy filing a
report.
9:26 p.m.—A Dakota City
man reported barking dogs in the
200 block of Main Street.
9:46 p.m.—A Humboldt
woman requested to speak to a
deputy about a child custody is-
sue.
Nov. 10
11:04 a.m.—Received a report
that someone struck a stop sign at
French Street and Kelling Street
in Renwick and then backed up
and struck it again. A city worker
was contacted about the downed
stop sign.
7:13 p.m.—A Renwick caller
reported a barking dog on Mc-
Curry Street during the past two
evenings. The owner of the dog
called back and was advised of
the complaint.
4:05 p.m.—A Gilmore City
man reported that another man
is chasing him in a vehicle and
threatening to kill him.
Nov. 11
4:25 a.m.—A Bode woman re-
ported that a male subject walked
into her house and left. It was re-
ported that the man was looking
for the subject’s sister.
11:12 a.m.—Furniture was
reported on Highway 3 between
States Avenue and the Thor/Hardy
turnoff.
5:30 p.m.—A property-dam-
age accident was reported on
Main Street in Dakota City.
7:30 p.m.—A suspicious vehicle
was reported in the 1400 block of
230
th
Street, rural Gilmore City.
The vehicle left, but caller asked
that the deputy check the ditch.
7:53 p.m.—Fastway in Ren-
wick reported that a maroon
Ford SUV left without paying for
$55.47 in gas.
6:48 p.m.—A Gilmore City
woman requested a deputy for a
possible prowler.
Nov. 12
8:27 a.m.—An ambulance,
Humboldt Fire Department and
emergency personnel were called
to the Martin Marietta Quarry at
2090 Penn Ave., for a male sub-
ject who was pinned underneath
a loader. The man was taken to
HCMH. No further details were
available.
10:20 a.m.—A car/deer ac-
cident was reported on Iowa Av-
enue, north of Bode.
HCSO investigates accidents
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 11A
Competitive cheerlead-
ing requires a number of
athletic skills similar to
gymnastics. In this photo,
Macy Larsen does a heel
stretch. Submitted photo.
Members of the Humboldt High School competitive
cheerleading team perform in a large group routine at
the Triton Challenge recently. Submitted photo.
Members of the Humboldt High School large group competitive cheerleading
squad are: front row from left; Lizabeth Gonzalez, Ashlyn Nicholson, Kenzie Shel-
gren, Rachel Buss, Tori Hamilton and Macy Larsen. Back row from left: Jocelyn
Waterbury, Haley Larson, Kelsy Applegate, Alyssa Carlson, Gloria Beltran, Paxton
King, Kyle McBeth, Gunnar Erickson and coach Karin Thiele. Jocelyn has been an
alternate on the team and Kyle and Gunnar have split duties. Submitted photo.
By Kent Thompson
Humboldt High School
completed a first Saturday,
Nov. 3. Its first ever state com-
petition in competitive cheer-
leading in the cheer/dance di-
vision.
While there has been much
debate about whether or not
cheerleading is a
sport, according
to the definition of
sport by Webster’s
New World Dic-
tionary, it certainly
meets the criteria.
“Sport is any
recreational ac-
tivity…requiring
bodily exertion,”
says Webster’s.
Cheer l eadi ng
definitely meets
that definition and
then some. Bod-
ies are moving and
there are athletic
movements that
require strength,
agility, balance,
coordination, stamina and an
overall level of physical fitness
that rivals other sports.
Anyone who has tried to
toss a 100-pound person in
the air and catch that person
would realize that it takes
some athleticism and skill. It’s
not something a person is like-
ly going to be able to do well
in their first attempt.
Cheerleading is very com-
parable to gymnastics in the
fact that there are flips and
tumbles and acrobatic rou-
tines.
Cheerleading also has ele-
ments of ice dancing and syn-
chronized swimming, which
are both Olympic medal
sports.
Cheerleaders compete, are
judged and have to practice
and stay in condition to per-
form, all elements of any com-
petitive recreational activity.
So, let’s focus on the Hum-
boldt Competitive Cheerlead-
ing Squad, how it came to be,
and what they have been doing
for more than four months.
The team is comprised of
11 girls and one boy and begin
practicing in earnest in July,
“although it’s kind of a year-
around activity,” according to
Humboldt cheer coach Karin
Thiele, who guided the team
during its season.
“Last spring, several of
the girls came to open gym to
learn new stunts and to work
on their routines,” Thiele said.
In July, the group began
practicing as a unit, learning
choreography and tumbling
moves in anticipation of the
competitive events.
The standard formation for
students is a nine-person base
for the back and three “flyers,”
girls who are lifted to the top
of the formation.
The large and small group
squads participated at the Tri-
ton Challenge in Fort Dodge
in late October, and then in the
state competition on Nov. 3 at
the Iowa State Fairgrounds in
Des Moines.
Humboldt’s large group
squad finished 14 of 15 schools
in the Class 3A cheer/dance di-
vision.
The stunt group A team of
Kenzie Shelgren, Rachel Buss,
Kelsy Applegate, Alyssa Carl-
son and Paxton King placed
24
th
of 32 teams in their rou-
tine. The stunt group B team
of Lizabeth Gonzalez, Macy
Larsen, Tori Hamilton, Ashlyn
Nicholson and Gloria Beltran
were 22
nd
of 32 teams.
The small group teams are
a group of five girls during
continuous stunts for one min-
ute.
There are 160 teams in the
state and 3A is one of the more
difficult divisions, Thiele re-
ports.
“Last year we
participated in
the sideline di-
vision but there
were no stunts,
tumbling or
dancing, so this
is all pretty new
to us,” the cheer-
leading coach
said.
“Most of the
girls couldn’t
tumble and not
too many had
dance experi-
ence, so we start-
ed learning those
things this past
summer,” Thiele
said.
Chantel Fridolfson helped
some of the members learn
their tumbling moves during
the summer.
Erin Olson, who was a
cheerleader at Iowa Central,
and Shondel Beaman, the high
school wrestling c heerleader
coach and a teacher associate
at Mease School, have assisted
Thiele in coaching the group.
Kelsy Applegate is a senior
member of the team and is so
enamored with the sport that
she hopes to pursue cheerlead-
ing in college.
“I was a football cheer-
leader and then I decided to
do this, too. You have to have
a lot of energy and be strong
enough to lift people and do
the stunts. It takes a lot of time
(to practice). You have to learn
how to lift correctly, so you
don’t injure yourself,” Apple-
gate said.
“There is a lot more to it,
than people think. There is
learning the routine, getting in
the right spot and learning the
right kicks, jumps and moves,”
Applegate said.
“I’d like to cheerlead in
college, so I hope I can get a
scholarship for competitive
cheerleading,” the senior said.
“I enjoy doing the stunts
but don’t like the dance or
tumbling much,” said senior
Kenzie Shelgren, who has
been involved in cheerleading
all three of her years in Hum-
boldt, and on the competitive
cheer team the past two years.
She said it’s not unusual to
spend 15-20 hours per week
practicing.
“It’s as demanding as being
out for a sport, and just as ath-
letic. I know I go home sore.
The only thing I’m not doing is
running,” said Shelgren, who
has also been active in track
and softball.
Rachel Buss was a mem-
ber of the United All-Stars
cheerleading squad out of Fort
Dodge for three years and de-
cided to join the Humboldt
School squad this year. Rachel
is a sophomore and is one of
the flyers.
“I like flying. You have to
be smaller and flexible and it
allows you to pull off some ac-
robatic moves,” Buss said.
Thiele said the routines
are judged on difficulty, form,
sharp motions, accuracy and
creativity.
“The team is pretty confi-
dent in its performances and
is working toward reaching its
goals and someday competing
for a first place trophy,” Thiele
said.
For now, the squad is happy
with continual improvements
and having a safe and com-
plete routine.
Thiele said the team hopes
to have a local performance in
December and to perform dur-
ing halftime of a Wildcat bas-
ketball game.
“As we gain experience and
exposure, we hope to get more
people interested in becom-
ing involved. People with a
tumbling or dance background
who are looking for an athletic
activity, should definitely con-
sider competitive cheer,” the
coach says.
Humboldt competes in State
Cheerleading Championships
New
sport
gets
its feet
off the
ground
LIVE IOWA. WORK IOWA. BANK IOWA.
Humboldt 515.332.1451 / Drive-up 515.332.1808
Gilmore City 515.373.6244 / bankiowabanks.com
Member FDIC
ALWAYS
THERE
Supporting the Arts in Humboldt County
Join us at the HAAC Art Encore November 17 from
6 p.m. to midnight at Rustix!
Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy • Simmons • Chromcraft • Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy •
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Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy • Simmons • Chromcraft • Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy •
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12A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
Highway 169 North
Humboldt
515.332.4586
Mon.-Thur. 9-9 • Fri. & Sat. 9-11 • Sun. 11-5
Lulu B • 750 mil
available in:
Cabernet Sauvignon,
Malbec,
Moscato,
Chardonnay,
Pinot Grigio
and Pinot Noir
$
6
+ dep.
Cutler Creek • 750 mil
available in:
Cabernet
Sauvignon,
Merlot,
Chardonnay,
Pinot Grigio
and Sweet Red
$
3
+ dep.
San Felipe • 750 mil
available in:
Chardonnay, Malbec
and Torrantes
$
9
+ dep.
Running with
Scissors • 750 mil
available in:
Cabernet
Sauvignon,
Merlot and
Chardonnay
$
9
+ dep.
Dolce Bacio • 750 mil
available in: Rosso
and Moscato D’Asti
$
9
+ dep.
Always a Wine
for 3-6-9
THANKSGIVING DAY STORE HOURS!
Wine & Spirits will be open
from 9 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.
Hy-Vee Grocery Store will be closing
at 2:00 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day
and reopening at 6:00 a.m. on
Friday, November 23.
Section B Thursday, November 15, 2012 Thursda
State meet celebration
Humboldt High School junior cross country runner Sam Larson was hoisted in the air by teammates and friends after plac-
ing seventh in the Class 3A State Championships last month in Fort Dodge. Larson and the rest of the squad were honored
at the team banquet last week. Pictured above, from left: Will Pogge, Wildcat mascot, Nick Heider, Larson, ColtonSchnetzer,
Karlee Peyton, Alexis Warden, Rex Daisy, Kaitlyn Daisy and Caitlyn Wadsley. Humboldt Independent photo. Visit the Inde-
pendent photo site to view or purchase photos at www.humboldtnews.com.
See Cross country, 2B
Kaitlynn
Vought
Wildcat girls named to All-NCC volleyball team
Vought 1st team, Lane and Jones 2nd team, Peters 3rd team
See NCC VB, 2B
Simms
moves into
SDSU lineup
Humboldt’s successful 2012
high school volleyball season
was evidenced by the selection
of four players to the North
Central All-Conference team.
League coaches released the
all-conference team. The Wild-
cats, runners-up in the league
with a 7-2 match record, 21-9
overall, had a first-team unani-
mous pick in senior middle
hitter Kaitlynn Vought.
Wildcat senior outside hitter
Erica Lane was named second-
team, along with junior outside
hitter April Jones. Junior setter
Sarah Peters was chosen third-
team.
Vought led Humboldt up
front with 269 kills as she con-
verted 504 of 591 spikes. Lane
was second with 198 kills while
Jones made 117. Peters served
266 of 290 with 27 aces. Peters
led the squad in assists with 331
and collected 112 digs.
Vought served 250 of 274 for
a team-high 39 aces. She also
led the squad in blocks with 91
total, which included 50 solos.
She had 113 digs. Jones had 36
blocks while Lane had 27. Lane
was second on the team in digs
with 137.
Humboldt coach Connie
Rasmussen, who wrapped up
her 13th year as head coach
of the Wildcats, had praise
for her squad on the season.
The junior varsity, coached by
Justin McDaniel, tied for the
conference crown with Iowa
Falls, Garrigan and Algona at
7-2. They were 13-5 overall.
The Wildcat freshman squad,
coached by Kathi Beach, went
8-1 and tied for second in the
NCC. They were 19-6 overall.
“Overall, it was a very good
season and a very good season
for all three clubs, varsity, ju-
nior varsity and ninth grade,”
Rasmussen said.
“When all three clubs can
finish second or better in the
North Central Conference,
that’s saying something about
the success we have had this
season,” Rasmussen said.
Humboldt won their own
tournament and later took the
Estherville tourney title. The
Wildcats saw their season end
in the first round of regional
play in a match at home with
Spencer. Eventual state cham-
pion Charles City emerged as
the regional champion.
“We started out the year
and played well in our home
tournament. One of our goals
was to win conference. I don’t
think anybody saw Iowa Falls
to become as good as they were
this season and win the league,”
Rasmussen said. “After we beat
Webster City, I thought that was
a good win since they were the
defending conference champi-
ons.”
“Iowa Falls made it to the
state tournament and played
really well. To end up 7-2 in
the conference is nothing to
hold your head down about.
The girls should be very proud
because it is one of our best
finishes in the conference in
the history that I’ve been here,”
Rasmussen said.
“Looking back, there were
some missed opportunities. I
felt we should have performed
better in the Carroll tourna-
ment. But then we had great
matches in the Estherville
tournament two to three weeks
Erica
Lane
April
Jones
Sarah
Peters
The Tri State All-Star
Volleyball series will be held
Saturday, Nov. 17, at North
Iowa Area Community Col-
lege in Mason City and a
distinct Humboldt flavor
will be on hand.
Humboldt High seniors
Erica Lane and Kaitlynn
Vought have been selected
to play for the Iowa squad,
which will be coached by
Wildcat veteran coach Con-
nie Rasmussen.
Lane, Vought to
play in all-star
volleyball series
Humboldt’s Rasmussen
picked to coach Iowa squad
Connie
Rasmussen
Team Iowa will play Team Minnesota at
11:30 a.m. Team Wisconsin will play Team
Minnesota at 12:40 p.m. with Team Iowa and
Team Wisconsin meeting at 1:50 p.m.
Admission will be $10 for adults and $5 for
students. Concessions will be available. Each
athlete will receive a top quality jersey with
number and logo, roster t-shirt, printed gym
sack and game day program.
Other members of Team Iowa include Lake
Mills middle hitter Kelci Larson and La ke Mills
libero Hallie Erdahl. Middle blocker Kaitlyn
Boyd of Denver. Mason City outside hitter
Amanda Bennett. North Union libero Cheyanne
Boland and North Union setter/hitter Allie In-
galls.
By Phil Monson
Uncertainty may have existed
when the Humboldt High School
girl-boy cross country teams began
their season three months ago.
But there is nothing uncertain
about the Wildcats’ future after
wrapping up the 2012 season re-
cently. The Wildcats saw extensive
growth in several areas that are
fueling optimism for 2013.
That was the message Wildcat
head coach Dean Clasen presented
at the team banquet held last week
(Nov. 6) at the middle school caf-
eteria.
Clasen, Humboldt’s veteran
coach, greeted a squad of newcom-
ers when practice began back on
Aug. 6. A total of 13 seniors from
the 2011 squad had graduated,
including five of the top seven
runners from both the boys and
the girls’ teams, so it was no secret
that Humboldt had a number of
positions to fill
Banquet honors Wildcat cross country team
“Add to those losses an ad-
ditional three members of the JV
boys team that didn’t return and
it was easy to assume that our
number of runners would be re-
ally low,” Clasen said. “As always
seems to happen, we had several
upper classmen join the boys team
for their first cross country experi-
ence and their presence, along with
a nice-sized freshman boys class,
boosted the boys numbers to 21.
More than we had a year ago.”
“The girls’ situation looked
pretty grim at the first practice.
With just four girls returning from
last year’s squad (two of which
had been rehabbing injuries) and
a lone freshman, it didn’t take a
genius to figure out that we might
have trouble earning a team score
in the upcoming season,” Clasen
said.
“By the end of the first week,
the recruiting efforts of the tam
were rewarded with the addition
of three more girls,” Clasen said.
“Yet another girl joined us late in
the season to bring the total to nine
runners for the girls.”
“As the season unfolded, it
quickly became evident that all of
the girls would be needed to insure
having a scoring team. A variety
of injuries, most of them chronic,
sidelined several of the girls for
multiple meets which impeded
the progress of the team,” Clasen
said. “The boys, on the other hand,
remained pretty healthy throughout
the season. There were a couple of
JV runners who missed meets but
those who ran varsity remained
healthy enough to run in nearly all
of the meets.”
The Wildcat varsity girls were
hampered by the absence of junior
Karlee Peyton, who sat out much
of the season with a stress fracture
discovered in one of her feet in late
August. Peyton didn’t return until
the conference meet in Algona on
Oct. 9.
The newcomers came along and
saw growth in helping the girls and
boys squads compete. The boys
finished fifth and the girls were
seventh in the conference meet
scoring. While the girls saw their
three-year reign as NCC champion
end optimism prevailed as Clasen
Sam
Larson
Colton
Schnetzer
Area high school wrestling standout Brance
Simms has stepped right into the starting lineup
for the South Dakota State University squad this
season.
Simms, of Gilmore City
and a 2012 graduate of Hum-
boldt High School, is holding
the 133-pound spot in the
Jackrabbit lineup. Simms
helped usher in the debut of
first-year head coach Chris
Bono, whose squad went
2-1 in the Huskie Duals last
weekend.
Simms is now 7-3 on the
season, including a 56-sec-
ond pin over Indiana’s Quin-
ton Murphy in SDSU’s 19-18
victory over the Hoosiers. Murphy was a four-
time state champion in New York state and was
the state’s all-time leader in wins.
SDSU lost 26-12 to Northern Illinois but
Simms won a 5-1 decision over Thorian Twyner.
SDSU also defeated Tiffin University and
Simms lost in sudden death overtime to Michael
Screptock, 4-3.
“The win over Indiana was great for our
program,” said Bono, who is working to put
Posts impressive pin in win
over Indiana standout
Brance
Simms
Corn Belt Conference co-champion West
Bend-Mallard/Gilmore City-Bradgate was rep-
resented with four players on the post-season
volleyball team.
The Wolverines, who compiled an overall
match record of 29-5 overall, finished 4-1 in the
league and ended up tied with Harris-Lake Park
and North Union for league honors.
Wolverines named to the first-team unit in-
clude Kayla Banwart, Courtney Bargmann and
McKenzie Grimm, all seniors. Senior Heather
Fehr was chosen second-team honors.
Corwith-Wesley-LuVerne High senior hitter
Sadie Poldervaart was voted second-team hon-
ors.
The Wolverines advanced to a regional final
before losing to No. 4 Janesville for a state
tournament berth.
Grimm led the Wolverines in attacks with
265 kills. Fehr had 153 kills and Bargmann 53.
Bargmann directed the WBM/GCB offense and
collected a whopping 708 assists. She also led
the squad in blocks with 95, including 17solo.
Bargmann had 77 digs and served 265 of 286
with 42 aces.
Grimm served 281 of 324 with a team-high
66 aces. She also had 168 digs and 93 blocks.
Fehr made 33 blocks, including two solos. She
had 59 digs and 153 kills. Fehr also served 311
of 348 with 51 aces.
Banwart was a back row libero specialist for
WBM/GCB places 4 on
Corn Belt All-Conf erence
CWL’s Sadie Poldervaart named to 2nd team
Sadie
Poldervaart
McKenzie
Grimm
Kayla
Banwart
Courtney
Bargmann
Heather
Fehr
See Corn Belt, 2B
Humboldt’s Ashley Ped-
ersen has closed out a
successful career on the
Central College volleyball
team.
Pedersen, a senior hitter
for the Dutch and a 2009
graduate of Humboldt
High School, had two kills
and three blocks in Cen-
tral’s 3-1 loss to Dubuque
in the Iowa Conference
meet held on Oct. 30.
Pedersen closes out
career at Central
Ashley
Pedersen
The loss ended Central’s season with an
overall match record of 9-20, 2-5 in conference
play. On the season, Pedersen had 175 kills,
second on the team. She had 27 ace serves, 61
digs and 51 blocks.
Central tuned up for the tournament by com-
peting in a tournament in Bloomington, IL, on
Oct. 27 and lost 3-0 to Carthage (WI) and 3-0
to Illinois Wesleyan. Pedersen had eight kills
against Wesleyan and four against Carthage.
See Simms, 2B
TaylorWeydert sets up the ball for a teammate in
Humboldt’s 4A regional tournament loss to Spencer on
Oct. 22 in Humboldt. Humboldt Independent photo.
2B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
Zittritsch on Dubuque
men’s cross country team
The Dakota City Demolition Crew hosted the Eastern Iowa
Outlaws (Dubuque) on Nov. 3 in Rolfe and came up on the short
end of a 181-147 score.
The local squad, with just six skaters, took on EIO’s bench of
10 deep and battled the visitors from start to finish. DCDC trailed
just 71-69 at halftime.
DC/DC’s Jammer McNothing earned Most Valuable Player
honors while blocker MizzChiff also earned MVP honors.
DC/DC skaters on the night included McNothing (Jenny
Randleman), Havoc (Jessica Schade, team co-captain), MizzChiff
(Domino Brundage), Livid Red GRRL (Heather Kimbrough, vice
president), Iron Hyde (Charity Thilges), Pale Burnhardt (Lauren
Walter, captain) and coach El SuperBeasto (Eric Schade).
“We are gaining quite a reputation for taking on teams twice
our size with just a bench of 6-9 skaters and are doing remarkable
well due to our teamwork and endurance levels,” Havoc said.
DC/DC will close the 2012 season on Dec. 15 when they travel
to Rock Island, IL, and play Farmfresh Roller Girls.
Dakota City
Demolition Crew comes
up short, 181-147
Members of the Dakota City Demolition Crew and their op-
ponent from Dubuque pose for the camera after their match
on Nov. 3 in Rolfe. Photo courtesy of Garrett McSomething
Bottorf.
the Wolverines. She served 345
of 365 with 39 aces. She had a
team-high 263 digs.
Poldervaart played 63 sets
for CWL and led the squad
with 73 kills, converting 182 of
242 spikes. She also served 131
of 155 with 28 aces. She also
made 81 digs and 13 blocks.
CORN BELT CONFERENCE 2012
VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
Conf All
Harris-Lake Park................. 4-1 25-15
North Union ........................ 4-1 23-17
West Bend-Mallard/GCB .... 4-1 25-9
Clay Central-Everly............. 2-3 18-10
Graettinger-Terril/R-Ayrs. .... 1-4 4-22
Corwith-Wesley-LuVerne .... 0-5 1-25
Corn Belt
SDSU’s Division I-A program on the map after a successful stint
at Middle Tennessee.
“Brance stepped up and got a fall to help us clinch the dual.
The win is definitely something we can build on,” Bono said.
Simms went 5-2 to finish fourth in the Daktronics Open on
Nov. 4.
Simms and the Jackrabbits will travel to Nebraska on Nov. 18
to face the Huskers and North Carolina in dual action.
Simms
CORN BELT ALL-CONFERENCE
VOLLEYBALL 2012
First Team: Kayla Banwart, WBM/
GCB, senior. Courtney Bargmann, WBM/
GCB, senior. McKenzie Grimm, WBM/
GCB, senior. Miranda Brueggeman,
H-LP, junior. Macy Gunderson, H-LP,
junior. Collete Haag, North Union, senior.
Noreen Morrow, H-LP, junior. Aurora Oli-
ver, North Union, junior. Stevie Jo Scott,
Clay Central-Everly, senior.
Second Team: Heather Fehr,WBM/
GCB, senior. Sadie Poldervaart, CWL,
senior. Marly Bakken, GT/RA, junior.
Cheyanne Boland, North Union, senior.
Madison Bollig, North Union, junior.
Heather Busch, senior. Mariah Gath,
H-LP, senior. Alyssa Hoffman, GT/RA,
senior. Allie Ingalls, North Union, senior.
Emily Jobst, CCE, senior.
continued from B front
continued from B front
Bowling league results at
Sundance Lanes in Humboldt.
IVY women Nov. 6
Won Lost
Key West Metal ...............158 142
Miller Freightlines .........151.5 118.5
Busy Bee Girls .................146 154
Detrick Electric .................145 125
EZ Trim ............................136 164
Humboldt Office Supply 103.5 136.5
Gloria Peterson 194, Linda Illg 515
LUCKY STRIKERS women Nov. 8
Won Lost
Easy Livin Lawn Care ...181.5 118.5
Split Happens ..................168 162
Personali-Tees .................165 135
NW Flooring.....................164 136
Vinsand Brothers ..........157.5 172.5
Coca Cola ........................155 175
AmerExpress Travel .....151.5 148.5
Doll Depot .....................148.5 151.5
Trinkets .........................121.5 178.5
Busy Bee ...................... 117.5 152.5
Pam Cameron 214-575
COMMERCIAL men Nov. 7
Won Lost
Meier................................212 118
Wagner Truck & Auto .......181 149
Lange Racing ..................151 149
Crossley Construction .....159 171
Sundance Coin .............133.5 166.5
Sturtz Racing ................123.5 206.5
Marc Pedersen 241-675
HAWKEYE men Nov. 8
Won Lost
Wacky GPK Shop .........218.5 141.5
The 3 X’s ......................207.5 152.5
Jeffers Wood ................202.5 157.5
Sit N Bull .......................198.5 161.5
Bowling league results
Golden Light ....................181 179
Maxx Tree Service ........180.5 149.5
JD Metal ..........................171 189
Seiler Appliance ............150.5 179.5
Road Kill ..........................141 219
Adams Knight & Assoc .... 119 241
Matt Dominick 259-683
FOUR LINER women Nov. 9
Won Lost
Sundance Coin ................182 88
BC Girls ........................149.5 120.5
Fantasy Flesh ..................139 131
AnderCo ..........................137 133
House Cats ......................109 161
Curves ............................93.5 176.5
Marlys Nesbitt 152-411
RECREATION men Nov. 7
Won Lost
Sturtz Racing ................145.5 124.5
Corey’s Team ................144.5 125.5
Dryroom Drunks ...........143.5 126.5
Reese’s Pieces ................143 127
WWE Fanatics .................135 135
Trupke Electric .................134 136
Sundance Coin .............126.5 143.5
Hormel Foods ..................108 162
Marc Pedersen 233-642
MAJOR men Nov. 5
Won Lost
Like a Boss ......................144 96
EasyLivinLawnCare ......154.5 145.5
Clay Construction ............153 147
AfterLife Lounge ..............150 150
Wacky GPK Shop .........149.5 150.5
Algona Bowlers................149 151
National Guard .............133.5 136.5
Worthington Insurance ....132 138
Sundance Coin ................141 159
Foertsch Plumb & Heat 133.5 166.5
Dan Foertsch 265-744
Humboldt’s Matt Zittritsch, a freshman on the University of
Dubuque men’s cross country team, competed in several meets
for the varsity squad in the 2012 season.
Zittritsch placed 159th overall in the NCAA Division III
Regional held Nov. 10 in Northfield, MN. Zittritsch ran the
8-kilometer course in 39:09.4. In the Iowa Conference meet on
Oct. 27 in Cedar Rapids, Zittritsch finished 54th in 29:41.2.
Zittritsch is a 2012 graduate of Humboldt High School.
Rutz goes 2-2 at ISU Open
Humboldt’s Tre’ Rutz, a second-year member of the Grand
View University wrestling team in Des Moines, went 2-2 last
Saturday (Nov. 10) in Nichols Invitational ISU Open in Ames.
Rutz, competing at 141 pounds, pinned O’Darius Williamson
(2:20) and won 7-4 over Matt Leibforth (St. Cloud State). He lost
6-4 to UNI’s Gunnar Wolfensperger (placed sixth) and 11-5 to
Steve Rodriguez (Illinois). Rodriguez placed fifth in the tourna-
ment.
“Tre’ is off to a good start this year,” Grand View head coach
Nick Mitchell said. “He competed at 149 during his redshirt year
and this season he has made the commitment to be at 141, which
is a better weight for him.”
“He put in a lot of time this summer and has improved a ton as
a result,” Mitchell said. “Last year he may have given some older
guys or some guys who were supposed to be good a little too
much credit and he’s changed that. He has a different approach
this year and because of that, he’s already a guy we’re talking
about who could be a difference maker for us in March.”
Grand View wrestles at Coe College in Cedar Rapids on Nov.
17.
Kluender on Wartburg CC squad
Humboldt’s Nathan Kluender, a freshmen on the Wartburg
College men’s cross country team, closed out his first year run-
ning for the Knights.
Wartburg finished sixth as a team in the NCAA Division III
Regional held Nov. 10 in Northfield, MN. The Knights were
fourth in the Iowa Conference meet held on Oct. 27 in Cedar
Rapids. Kluender ran 110th in the race with a time of 29:18.8.
Kluender also ran in the Drews Invitational at LaCrosse, WI,
on Oct. 13, and finished 23rd in 29:52.3. In the Dan Huston
Invitational on Oct. 6 in Waverly, Kluender ran 72nd in 29:08.
Wartburg had an alumni team that ran, which included Humboldt
native Jon Stover. Stover ran 28th in 26:38.
Austin Flick, a junior on the Humboldt High School boys’
cross country team this past season, is shown here compet-
ing for the Wildcats during a meet early in the 2012 season.
Humboldt Independent photo.
Hu mb o l d t
Hi g h j u n i o r
r u n n e r Be n
Madison, shown
here competing
during the 2012
season, is among
several newcom-
ers who contrib-
uted in the re-
cent campaign.
Humboldt Inde-
pendent photo.
Damian Warden is shown here competing for the Wildcat
cross country team during the 2012 regular season. Humboldt
Independent photo.
later,” Rasmussen said. “It was
disappointing that we didn’t
win our regional tournament
opener over Spencer. That was
hard because we wanted to
play in the regional final in our
home gym.”
“But none of it was from
a lack of effort. Sometimes it
isn’t in the cards to meet every
goal you set out to do,” Ras-
mussen said. “But again, as we
look back, overall it was a very
successful season.”
Rasmussen has compiled a
career won-loss record of 261-
169-10 at Humboldt. Other
top finishes in her tenure at
Humboldt include runner-up
in 2008, runner-up in 2005 and
first in 2007.
The Wildcats bid farewell to
a senior class of nine athletes
who have played an integral
part of recent success. The class
includes Bri Carda, Jenny Halv-
erson, Christina Jensen, Caitlin
Kohlhaas, Anna Tecklenburg,
Taylor Weydert, Kinzie Wright,
Lane and Vought.
“Nine seniors is a lot of
seniors. In the last few years
I’ve had some larger groups,
but this is a testament to them
to stay with it, put in the time
during the off-season and a
few of them knowing they
probably weren’t going to get
a lot of playing time. It meant
a lot to all of them to be part
of the team. They were great
leaders in practice. They will
be missed. Each brought some-
thing unique to the team and
they did work well together,”
Rasmussen said.
“I credit those girls for stick-
ing it out. Having nine seniors
is a big number. I’m proud they
enjoyed volleyball and wanted
to be a part of that team aspect.
We try to do fun things during
the season besides just playing
matches. To me it’s more about
what they learn being together
with each other, what it’s like
being part of a team and you
might have to sacrifice and a
lot of those did sacrifice for
this team to be successful,”
Rasmussen said.
“They should all be proud
of what they accomplished this
year,” Rasmussen said.
“We have always had re-
spectable teams, even if we did
finish in the middle of the pack
in the conference. The NCC is
a strong volleyball conference,”
Rasmussen said.
“7-2 is a really good finish
and I’m proud of that and the
girls should be proud of it. We
always want to compete and be
in the race for the conference
title every year,” Rasmussen
said. “We put ourselves into po-
sition and the girls are already
talking about the off-season
preparation for next season.”
“The freshmen went 8-1
in the NCC and the JV were
7-2. Those are very, very good
seasons. Those girls got a lot
of playing time and gained ex-
perience. The sophomores and
juniors will be looked upon to
NCC VB continued from B front
fill quite a few positions next
year,” Rasmussen said. “We’ll
get the ball rolling in the off-
season and get ready for when
next August rolls around.”
2012 NORTH CENTRAL
ALL-CONFERENCE
First Team: Kaitlynn Vought,* Hum-
boldt, senior middle hitter. Harli Janes,*
Iowa Falls, senior middle hitter. Ali
Grein,* Algona, junior middle hitter.
Kaylee Schnathorst,* Webster City,
junior outside hitter. Lindsay Barnhart,
Iowa Falls, senior setter. Carly Ouver-
son, Clear Lake, senior setter. Jamie
Peterson, Iowa Falls, senior outside
hitter. Kaitlyn Pitzen, Clear Lake, se-
nior middle hitter. Kylie Gerstein, Iowa
Falls, junior outside hitter. Jossie Sann,
Clarion-Goldfield, junior middle hitter.
*Unanimous selection.
Second Team: Erica Lane, Hum-
boldt, senior outside hitter. April Jones,
Humboldt, junior middle hitter. Hannah
Lentsch, FD St. Edmond, senior middle
hitter. Macoy Rohrer, Clarion-Goldfield,
senior libero. Stephanie Steiner, Clarion-
Goldfield, senior setter. Jenna Peterson,
Clear Lake, senior outside hitter. JEssi
Timm, Iowa Falls, senior right hitter. Mor-
gan Gourley, Webster City, junior outside
hitter/libero. Tatum Meyer, Algona, junior
middle hitter. Kelsey Redmond, Iowa
Falls, sophomore middle hitter.
Third Team: Sarah Peters, Hum-
boldt, junior setter. Taryn Barz, Hampton-
Dumont, senior setter/middle hitter.
Claire Crimmins, FD St. Edmond, senior
outside hitter. Chelsi Lanus, Bishop
Garrigan, senior middle hitter. Riley
Quintus, Eagle Grove, senior outside hit-
ter. Rachel Teague, Algona, senior right
hitter. Alli Huss, FD St. Edmond, junior
middle hitter. Ashley Price, Webster
City, junior setter. Sophia Wibholm, Iowa
Falls, junior libero. Hope Polzin, Clarion-
Goldfield, sophomore dig specialist.
Humboldt Statistics
Sets: Kaitlynn Vought 83, Erica Lane
80, April Jones 83, Kinzie Wright 76,
Jenny Halverson 77, Christina Jensen
83, Caitlin Kohlhaas 64, Lindsey Johnson
18, Sarah Peters 83, Taylor Weydert 83,
Maggy Duffield 2, Anna Tecklenburg 8,
Brittney Nilles 71, Bri Carda 7, Chelsea
McLimans 2, Maddie Thomas 12..
Attacks: Vought 504-591 (269 kills),
Lane 530-601 (198), Jones 273-316,
(117), Kinzie Wright 309-372 (100),
Jenny Halverson 131-163 (63), Jensen
99-112 (27), Kohlhaas 74-100 (23),
Johnson 37-45 (19), Peters 53-64 (9),
Weydert 20-21 (4), Duffield 3-4 (3),
Tecklenburg 8-11 (1), Nilles 7-8, Carda
0-1, McLimans 2-2, Thomas 1-1.
Assists: Peters 331, Weydert 206,
Jensen 108, Halverson 21, Vought 10,
Wright 8, Nilles 8, Lane 5, Tecklenburg 5,
Kohlhaas 4, Johnson 3, Jones 2, Thomas
1.
Digs: Nilles 216, Wright 186, Lane
137, Weydert 126, Vought 113, Peters
112, Kohlhaas 87, Jensen 34, Halverson
29, Johnson 25, Jones 22, Thomas 13,
Carda 5, McLimans 4, Tecklenburg 1.
Blocks (assist-solo): Vought 41-50,
Jones 21-15, Lane 19-8, Jensen 16-4,
Halverson 13-6, Wright 7-3, Johnson 3-3,
Kohlhaas 1-2, Nilles 1-0.
Serving: Peters 266-290 (27 aces),
Weydert 256-275 (18), Wright 254-285
(26), Vought 250-274 (39), Nilles 244-
258 (17), Lane 181-195 (15), Johnson
35-38 (5), Thomas 31-34, McLimans 5-5,
Carda 2-2, Jones 3-3, Jensen 3-3 (1).
Season best records in 2012
Serving percentage: Brittney Nilles,
94.6 percent.
Ace serves: Kaitlynn Vought, 39.
Serve reception: Vought 70 percent.
Kill efficiency: Vought .308 percent.
Kills: Vought 269.
Blocks: Vought 50 solos, 41 assists.
Digs: Nilles 232.
Assists: Peters 331.
Seniors: Bri Carda, Jenny Halverson,
Christina Jensen, Caitlin Kohlhaas, Erica
Lane, Anna Tecklenburg,Kaitlynn Vought,
Taylor Weydert and Kinzie Wright.
Juniors: April Jones, Lindsey John-
son, Chelsea McLimans, Brittney Nilles,
Sarah Peters, Maddie Thomas, Katie
Zabel.
Sophomores: Maggy Duffi el d,
Emma Bennett, Megan Bormann, Megan
Kramer, Tara Larson, Amaris Runia,
Savannah Schnetzer, Cassie Shimon
and Vanessa Skow.
Freshmen: Vanessa Davis, Hannah
Friesth, Autumn Hauser, Emily Hughes,
Talyn Larsen, Kaitlyn Larson, Kenzie
Ross, Morgan Weydert.
Statisticians: Chase Nokleby, Ashlyn
Nicholson.
NORTH CENTRAL CONFERENCE
VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
Conf All
Iowa Falls-Alden ................. 9-0 32-5
Humboldt ............................ 7-2 21-9
Clarion-Goldfield ................. 6-3 20-13
Webster City ....................... 6-3 21-12
Algona ................................ 6-3 23-15
Clear Lake .......................... 5-4 17-15
FD St. Edmond ................... 3-6 11-16
Hampton-Dumont ............... 1-8 4-22
Eagle Grove........................ 1-8 9-23
Algona Bishop Garrigan ..... 0-9 11-19
BIANCHI
Residential Commercial
Specializing in
Service • Sales • Installation
SERVICE ON ALL MAKES AND MODELS
15 South 17th Street • Fort Dodge
515-955-6680
• NOTICE •
Humboldt Mutual Insurance
and
Abens-Marty-Curran Agency
Friday, November 23, 2012
for the Thanksgiving Holiday!
Sarah
Rasmussen
Editor
ADVI SOR: Rodd Mooney EDI TORS: Ashl ey Edge, Sarah Rasmussen, Ashl ey Samuel son
STAFF: Mi cheal Bowden, Ni ck Hei der, Ashl ey Lauger, Abby Naeve, Chase Nokl eby, Tyl er Rut z
Ashley
Sammuelson
Editor
Chase
Nokleby
Staff Writer
Name: Ashley Edge
Activities: FFA, Cat Chron-
icles
Parents: Jay and Michelle
Edge
What is your pet peeve?
People who are never on
time
If you could have any su-
per power, what would it
be and why? I would want
the power to control every-
thing, because i hate when
stuff does not go my way.
What is your favorite
quote? “Advise is what we
ask for when we know the
answer but we are hoping
someone will tell us what
we want to hear instead of
what we know.”
If you could eat dinner
with three people, who
would they be? Hunter
Hayes, My Great Grandma
larson, Channing Tatum
Where do you see your-
self in ten years? Working
Name: Brady McCullough
Parents: Brian and Christy
McCullough.
If you had one day left in
your life, what would you
accomplish? Spend the day
with my grandma.
What is your pet peeve?
When people call their truck
a car.
If you could have any su-
per power, what would it
be and why? Super strength
because I could do pretty
much anything.
What is your favorite
quote? Go hard or go home.
If you could eat dinner
with three people, who
would they be? Justin
Moore, Jason Aldean, and
Eric Church.
What is your favorite
song? Take a Ride by Jason
Aldean
Future Plans: Go to col-
lege at Iowa Central for
construction and work.
Name: Ben Jacobson
Activities: Jets, Football,
Baseball, Basketball, and
Track
Parents: Mike and Ramo-
na Jacobson
If you had to eat one
food for the rest on your
life what would it be?
Spaghetti and Meatballs
If you could eat dinner
with three people, who
would they be? Babe
Ruth, Peyton Manning,
and Nolan Ryan
If you could live any-
where, where would it
be and why? Florida, it’s
warm year-round and you
get to live near the ocean
Where do you see your-
self in ten years? In the
mirror
What is your strangest
talent/hobby? Dancing
and Singing
Future Plans: Attend
College
Name: Tea Farmer
Parents: Wendy Trosdahl
and Tina ProIft
What advice do you give to
the underclassmen? Don’t
care what others think
If you were stranded on an
island, what is one thing
you would want most? My
best friend
If you were an animal,
what would you be and
why? An owl, becasue they
are awesome
What is your pet peeve?
People Complaining
What is your favorite
quote? “Peace begins with a
smile.” -Mother Teresa
,I \RX FRXOG ¿QG WKH DQ-
swer to one question, what
would it be? What is the
meaning of life?
Where do you see yourself
in ten years? Traveling
Future Plans: Live life to
the fullest
Every year there are an
abundance of movies that
are released to provide en-
tertainment. Most of the
time, everyone wants to see
it as soon as it comes out, or
they choose to go to a mid-
night premiere of it because
they can’t wait. So what are
some of the upcoming mov-
ies that people would want
to see?
One of the more popular
movies that will be released
is The Twilight Saga: Break-
ing Dawn Part Two. It’s
about the follow up of their
frst child, vampire husband
and wife team Bella (Kris-
ten Stewart) and Edward
(Robert Pattinson) must
battle against a league of
vampire clans. The clans are
all claiming that the baby is
an immortal “monster” that
doesn’t deserve to live.
A movie that would be
enjoyable for a younger
audience is the upcoming
movie Wreck-It Ralph. This
is an animated movie about
a bad guy voiced by John
C. Reilly. He longs to be as
beloved as his game’s per-
fect good guy, Fix-It Felix
(Jack McBrayer). Problem
is, no one likes a bad guy,
but they do love heroes. So
when a modern, frst person
shooter game arrives featur-
ing tough-as-nails Sergeant
Calhoun (Jane Lynch),
Ralph sees it as his ticket to
heroism and happiness.
Another movie that peo-
With the way that the econo-
my is and how much every-
thing costs, people are al-
ways looking for better ways
to make money fast. While
many people are applying
for jobs they also have to be
prepared for what they have
to do before they get the job.
Many people are not ready
for their interviews but here
are some tips to help.
The frst thing to an inter-
view is the frst impression.
When going to an interview
you always want to dress up
more than what you think
is necessary. When walking
into an interview the em-
ployer can take one look at
you are able to judge wheth-
er or not you are put to-
gether, clean, and organized.
One trick to looking proper
for an interview is wearing
neutral colors. You always
want to look nice and have
the employer paying atten-
tion to you and not your
clothes. Next thing is al-
ways try to wear clothing
that has minimal pockets.
While talking to the em-
ployer they want to know
that you are confdent and
interested in what they
are saying. The last tip on
clothing is not overdoing
your outft with accesso-
ries. While accessories can
make an outft look very
nice and put together, you
do not want to be fdgeting
with bracelets, messing
with necklaces, or digging
in a purse.
Keeping the interview
on a good path is mak-
ing sure that your resume
shows how organized
and professional you are.
When an employer is read-
ing through a resume they
should be able to read the
resume with ease. The re-
sume should be one page,
clean, not cluttered, and
have enough information
to leave the employer with
no questions about recent
jobs, but only leave them
to ask you how hard of a
worker you truly are.
While you are in the in-
terview you should always
have your portfolio on
hand. In this portfolio you
should have many things
such as, Table of Con-
tents, Traditional Resume,
Skills and Abilities, Three
Letters of Recommenda-
tion, Awards and Honors,
Degrees, and Transcripts.
While not everyone will
have all of these docu-
ments, reasons to have
them are to distinguish
yourself from the other ap-
plicants, turn the interview
into an offer, prove the abili-
ties and records in your re-
sume, and help the employer
fnd the position that is right
for you.
While in the interview,
the employer likes to know
that you are paying attention
at all times. There are many
ways to do this while eye
contact may be one of the
most important. While an
employer is talking to you,
you should have eye contact,
arms uncrossed, for ladies
ankles crossed not knees,
hands out of pockets, and a
slight lean forward towards
the employer. When doing
this, the employer will be
able to tell that you are pay-
ing attention and interested
in everything they are say-
ing.
After being asked a ques-
tion in the interview it is not
a race to answer the ques-
tion frst. Take your time,
talk slow, and show them
how calm and collected you
are. Answer the questions
in a positive and collected
order while using facts that
the employer mentioned be-
fore to prove how well you
were listening. During the
interview the employer is
looking for someone who
is confdent, able to do the
job well, handle on the spot
questions, and someone who
has done their research.
The best thing to do be-
fore an interview is research.
You do not have to know ev-
ery detail about everything
that happens, but rather be
able to impress the employ-
er on that you know what is
happening with the business
and how you would be able
a positive addition to the
team.
At the end of an interview
it is always good to leave
them with a positive image
of you in their head. The
simplest yet most important
way to do this is with a frm
handshake. Even though the
interview may have went
great many of the employers
put a huge deal of the deci-
sion the last hand shake.
While there are many parts
to an interview and much to
get ready for, the best thing
that you can do is practice.
Although you are always
able to sit down with friends
or family and ask questions,
the greatest practice is to go
in for a formal interview at
another business. Although
your interview may have
went well but were not able
get the job, always be pre-
pared for the next. While
going through the interview
process may be long and
exhausting, it will pay off
in the end. You just need to
keep your head up high and
be ready to get them in the
next interview.
ple may enjoy is The Hobbit:
An Unexpected Journey. The
adventure follows the char-
acter Bilbo Baggins (Martin
Freeman), who is swept into
a quest to reclaim the lost
kingdom, which was long
ago conquered by the dragon
known as Smaug (Benedict
Cumberbatch). Approached
out of the blue by the wiz-
ard Gandalf the Grey (Ian
McKellen), Bilbo fnds him-
self joining a company of
13 dwarves led by a warrior
known as Thorin (Richard
Armitage).
Of course, those movies
aren’t the only releases com-
ing out soon. There are many
other movies people might
enjoy. This is just giving a
little preview of some of the
movies that will be coming
out in the near future.
Living without a real
home, a real bed, and a real
job creates new struggles
each and every day, and
when one might think that
this problem is not relevant
to the small state of Iowa,
it is. Over 17,900 homeless
people inhabit the state of
Iowa.
November 10-18th is
National Homelessness
Awareness Week, and Hum-
boldt High School is plan-
ning on participating in an
impactful way. The senior
students enrolled in Mrs.
Brenda Rush’s Economics
class right now are discuss-
ing the topic of homeless-
ness around the nation and
in Iowa. Mrs. Rush decided
to discard the normal essay
option for the closure of
this unit, but instead, create
a project that will impact
and inform more than just
the individual.
The students are planning
on making the community
aware of the problems that
homelessness causes by
creating a “Tent City” on
the Humboldt High School
grounds to display the
types of environments that
homeless people live in.
The students will be dis-
playing the correct propor-
tion of each population of
homeless people including
but not limited to veterans,
children,unaccompanied
minors, and people feeing
domestic abuse. Each dis-
play will have props, signs,
quotes, and symbols that re-
late them to a population of
homeless people that they
represent.
But this is not the only
thing that HHS will be do-
ing to create awareness for
homelessness. Each stu-
dent had the choice to par-
ticipate in one other event
that involved working with
people in the community
and school. One option
that students could choose
is to give tours of the tents
displayed on the lawn of
HHS. The students will be
responsible for inviting the
public and leading them
through the city. Each tent
will have a specifc address
and each group is to make a
brochure guide for the tour-
ists to follow.
Another event that HHS
is creating is an “Eat or
Starve” program one day
at lunch. Students in the
high school may volunteer
to be a part of the program,
in which they will draw
a card. Each card will be
color-coded representing
either upper class citizens
(receiving more than av-
erage food), middle class
citizens (receiving an aver-
age serving), or lower class
citizens (receiving a small
portion of food). This event
will hopefully teach the stu-
dent body to be aware that
others may not be as fortu-
nate as themselves.
One of the groups is
in charge of student body
education, awareness, and
publicity. The last group
was a small group of stu-
dents who were in charge
of advocating the subject to
public oIfcials at the city,
county, state, or federal
levels about the problems
of homelessness in today’s
society.
As students, we believe
that this is a problem worth
taking the time to study and
educate others, especially
when it is happening in our
communities. Mrs. Rush
created this project in hopes
that the senior class would
strive to make a difference,
and although this project is
just underway, students are
really excited for the out-
come. To kick off the week
on Monday, HHS is hav-
ing a school wide assembly
with guest speakers from
the Beacon of Hope Men’s
Shelter in Fort Dodge,
Iowa. This should get the
student body excited about
stepping up and making a
difference.
Thursday, November 15, 2012 · 3B
RUTLAND-
OTTOSEN
Churches
ST. MARY’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Jim Tigges
Humboldt
SATURDAY: 4:30 p.m.,
confessions; 5 p.m., mass.
SUNDAY: 8:30 a.m., con-
fessions; 9 a.m. mass.
ABUNDANT LIFE
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Non-Denominational
Pastor Gary Goetsch
608 13th Street N.
Humboldt
SUNDAY: 10 a.m., wor ship
service; 6 p.m., Bible study.
TUESDAY: 7:30 p.m.,
prayer time.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Rev. Tim Rieckhoff-Faris
LuVerne
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m., wor-
ship.
WEDNESDAY: 7:30 a.m.,
Prayer Breakfast; UMW - 1
st
Wednesday of each month.
THIRD THURSDAY: 7
a.m., men's breakfast.
ZION EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(MissouriSynod)
Pastor Jason P. Peterson
Deacon Steve Struecker
LuVerne
SUNDAY: 8:45 a.m., adult
Bible classes and Sunday
School; 10:45 a.m., worship.
WEST BEND
APOSTOLIC CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
Wayne Fehr, Minister
Wayne Grimms, Minister
West Bend
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m., and 1
p.m., worship ser vices.
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Rutland
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m., wor-
ship; 11:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship.
ST. JOHN’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Jim Tigges
Gilmore City
SATURDAY, 7 p.m., mass.
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Gilmore City
SUNDAY: 9:30 a.m., coffee
fellowship; 10:30 a.m., wor-
ship.
SACRED HEART
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Jim TIgges
Livermore
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m.,
Mass.
IMMANUEL
LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Rev. Michael Botsford
Deacon Steve Struecker
Livermore
SUNDAY: 8:15 a.m., wor-
ship; Sunday school to follow.
ST. JOSEPH’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Victor Ramaeker
St. Joe
SUNDAY: 8-8:45 a.m., rec-
onciliation; 9:00 a.m., Mass,
1
st
3
rd
and 5
th
weekend of the
month.
SATURDAY: 4-4:45 p.m.,
reconciliation; 5:00 p.m.,
Mass, 2
nd
and 4
th
weekend of
the month.
THE SHARED
MINISTRY OF ROLFE
Rev. Charles Miller
Rolfe
SUNDAY: 9 a.m., worship;
10 a.m., coffee hour; 10 a.m.,
Sunday School; 10:15 a.m.
adult class – Lord’s Prayer.
ST. MARGARET’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Andy Hoffman
Rolfe
SUNDAY: 10:15 a.m.,
Mass.
FIRST LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Lay Pastor Dan Buhs
Gilmore City
SUNDAY: 8:45 a.m., Sun-
day school; 10 a.m., worship.
GILMORE CITY
HUMBOLDT HUMBOLDT
ST. JOE
ROLFE
LIVERMORE BODE
THOR
LUVERNE
PALMER
4B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Rutland
SUNDAY: 9 a.m., worship;
10 a.m., coffee fellowship.
THE
CONGREGATIONAL
UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Lisa Minor,
Director of Christian
Education
Humboldt
THURSDAY, Nov. 15:
11:30 a.m., Peace Circle; 1:30
p.m., Faith Circle.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 9 a.m.,
Trustees; 9 a.m., Sunday
school; 10 a.m., worship; 11
a.m., coffee and fellowship.
MONDAY, Nov. 19: 4 p.m.,
Outreach and Evangelism; 7
p.m., Al-Anon.
TUESDAY, Nov. 20: 6 p.m.,
Yoga.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21:
3:30 p.m., 4-H writers; 7 p.m.,
choir; 7 p.m., Thanksgiving
service .
FAITH LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Dr. Dennis Niles,
Lead Pastor
Russell Weller, Youth Pastor
Jane Larsen, Children and
Family Director
Stacy Beschorner,
Pre-School Coordinator
Rural Palmer
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14:
6:30 p.m., seventh and eighth
grade confirmation; 7:30 p.m.,
puppet practice; 7:30 p.m.,
high school Bible study.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 8:45
a.m., Sunday school; 10 a.m.,
worship; 6 p.m., Ignite Youth
Group.
MONDAY, Nov. 19: 6 p.m.,
Radical junior high Bible
study; 7 p.m., church council
meeting.
TUESDAY, Nov. 20: 7:30
p.m., Praise Band practice.
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Administrative Office:
107 4th St. N., P.O. Box 647
Humboldt
Daily Dial-A-Devotion
332-1899
Weekly worship services:
Saturday 5:30 p.m.
Sunday
8:55 a.m. Humboldt
9 a.m. Livermore
10:30 a.m. Gilmore City
10:30 a.m. Rutland
Coffee fellowships:
9:30 a.m. Gilmore City
10 a.m. Humboldt
10 a.m. Livermore
11:30 a.m. Rutland
FRIDAY, Nov. 16:
7 a.m., Prayer Group IV,
Miller’s Landing;
8 a.m., Prayer Group 1 and
2;
8:15 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Life-
line screening, Morehouse
Hall;
9 a.m., bulletin preparation,
room 20.
SATURDAY, Nov. 17:
8:30 a.m., Share pick up,
West Fork Services;
5:30 p.m., worship, Hum-
boldt center.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18:
8 a.m.-1 p.m., omelet fund-
raiser, Morehouse Hall;
8:55 a.m., worship, Hum-
boldt center;
9 a.m., worship, Livermore
center;
10-11 a.m., Praise Choir,
Livermore;
10:30-11:30 a.m., Sunday
school, Livermore;
10:30 a.m., worship, Rut-
land center;
10:30 a.m., worship, Gilm-
ore City center;
2 p.m., ecumenical Thanks-
giving worship, Gilmore City
center.
MONDAY, Nov. 19:
7 a.m., Sarah Circle, Mill-
er’s Landing;
8 a.m.-8 p.m., Tree Walk set
up;
9 a.m.-12 noon, China
Painters, room 24;
1-9 p.m., Cliff Isaacson,
room 23;
1-3 p.m., China Painters
meeting, room 20;
5 p.m., Joyous Abandon;
7 p.m., Charisma Circle,
room 22.
TUESDAY, Nov. 20:
8 a.m.-8 p.m., Tree Walk set
up;
9-10 a.m., Shalom Bible
study, room 21;
10-11 a.m., staffing;
3-5 p.m., Gilmore City ASP;
3:30-6 p.m., G.E.D., room
21;
4:30 p.m., Friends/Faith,
room 22.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21:
8 a.m.-8 p.m., Tree Walk set
up;
9 a.m., bulleting prep;
2:45 p.m., Sounds of Cel-
ebration;
6-7 p.m., Humbells, adult
choir;
6:15-8:15 p.m., 3:6 Teen
Youth, Morehouse Hall, room
21;
7-8:30 p.m., Beginnings,
room 24;
7-8:15 p.m., confirmation
youth, room 30;
7 p.m., Chancel Choir.
THURSDAY, Nov. 22:
Church office closed,
Thanksgiving Day.
FRIDAY, Nov. 23:
Church office closed.
OAK HILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Doug Wolter,
Senior Pastor
Brian Friedl,
Associate/Youth Pastor
Steph Heinz,
Preschool Director
Humboldt
FRIDAY, Nov. 16: 6 a.m.,
men’s Bible study.
SATURDAY, Nov. 17: 6
p.m., Church Game Night.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 9:15
a.m., Sunday school; 10:30
a.m., worship; 4 p.m., middle
school Bible study; 6 p.m.,
Gratitude 168; 6:15 p.m., high
school Alive/study.
MONDAY, Nov. 19: 4:30
p.m., Prayer Ministry; 6:30
p.m., Church Board; 6:30
p.m., Mission Board.
TUESDAY, Nov. 20: 7 a.m.,
men’s Bible study; 12 noon,
men’s Bible study.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21:
6:15 p.m., NO Awana; 6:15
p.m., NO Oak Hill Alive.
THURSDAY, Nov. 22: Hap-
py Thanksgiving.
OUR SAVIOUR’S
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Gene Broughton
Pastor Matthew Manz
Humboldt
THURSDAY, Nov. 15: 8
a.m., staff devotions; 9 a.m.,
women’s Bible study; 1 p.m.,
Women’s Core Group; 6 p.m.,
Troop #32; 6:30 p.m., Church
Council; 7 p.m., musical audi-
tions.
FRIDAY, Nov. 16: 8 a.m.,
staff devotions; 6 p.m., wed-
ding rehearsal.
SATURDAY, Nov. 17: 4
p.m., Croker wedding; 5:30
p.m., worship.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 8:30
a.m., worship; 9:30 a.m., cof-
fee; 9:45 a.m., Sunday School;
10 a.m., adult Sunday school;
10:45 a.m., children’s hand
bell practice; 11 a.m., praise
worship.
MONDAY, Nov. 19: 8 a.m.,
staff devotions; 4:30 p.m.,
Drop-In Center meal and
games; 6:30 p.m., women’s
Bible study.
TUESDAY, Nov. 20: 8:30
a.m., staff meeting; 10 a.m.,
study of Revelation; 5:30 p.m.,
Den #1; 6 p.m., Girl Scout pic-
tures; 7 p.m., Troop #108.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21:
6:30 a.m., men’s breakfast
meeting; 6:30 a.m., ladies
prayer group; 8 a.m., staff
devotions; 5:30 p.m., Youth
Game Nite; 5:45 p.m., Youth
Choir; 6:30 p.m., youth sup-
per; 7 p.m., confirmation; 7
p.m., Senior Choir; 7 p.m., se-
nior high youth.
The radio broadcast for
Sunday, Nov. 18, is sponsored
by Rick and Deanna Nervig in
memory of Don Harvey.
HUMBOLDT
ST. OLAF
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Steve Bliss
Bode
THURSDAY, Nov. 15: 8
a.m., men’s breakfast; 9 a.m.,
Lydia; 1:15 p.m., North Care
Center communion; 2 p.m.,
Mary Martha.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 9:15
a.m., adult class; 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday school; 10:30 a.m.,
worship with communion.
MONDAY, NOV. 19: 7
p.m., Church Council meeting.
TUESDAY, Nov. 20: 8 a.m.,
women’s breakfast.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21: 7
p.m., Thanksgiving Eve ser-
vice.
THURSDAY, Nov. 22:
Thanksgiving Day, office
closed.
ULLENSVANG
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Darryl Landsverk
Thor
THURSDAY, Nov. 15: 4
p.m., Afterschool Program.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 9:30
a.m., coffee and fellowship; 11
a.m., worship, potluck follow-
ing service .
TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Gene Broughton
Pastor Matthew Manz
Rutland - Ottosen
SATURDAY, Nov. 17: Ot-
tosen bazaar.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 9 a.m.,
worship – Rutland; 10:30 a.m.,
worship – Ottosen; Ottosen
council.
ZION EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
J. K. Raether, Senior Pastor
Aaron Flatau,
Assistant Pastor
Humboldt
FRIDAY-SUNDAY, Nov.
16-18: LYC Youth Gathering
in Des Moines.
SATURDAY, Nov. 17: 7
a.m., men’s Bible breakfast; 6
p.m., worship.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 8:30
a.m., Sunday school; 8:45
a.m., youth and adult Bible
study; 10 a.m., worship; 5:30
p.m., LYC Senior Citizen
Thanksgiving dinner.
MONDAY, Nov. 19: 6 p.m.,
Education; 7 p.m., Evange-
lism.
TUESDAY, Nov. 20: 9:15
a.m., women’s Bible study; 2
p.m., LWML Bingo at North
Care Center; 6:45 p.m., wom-
en’s Bible study; 7 p.m., Life
Light.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21: 10
a.m., preschool Thanksgiving
program; 12 noon, Ministerial
Alliance at Humboldt County
Memorial Hospital Board
Room; 6:30 p.m., Steward-
ship; 7:30 p.m., Thanksgiving
Eve worship; 8:30 p.m., des-
sert and refreshments.
THURSDAY, Nov. 22:
Thanksgiving Day, office
closed.
FRIDAY, Nov. 23: NO pre-
school.
SATURDAY, Nov. 24: 8
a.m., decorate the church for
Christmas; 6 p.m., worship
with communion.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 8:30
a.m., Sunday school; 8:45
a.m., youth and adult Bible
study; 10 a.m., worship with
communion.
LAKE
LUTHERAN
CHURCH LCMC
Lutheran Congregation
in Mission for Christ
Pastor Truman Larson
Goldfield
SUNDAY: 9:00 a.m., wor-
ship; 10:15 a.m., Sunday
School.
HAUGE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Association of Free
Lutheran Congregations
Wayne Almlie, Lay Minister
Goldfield
SUNDAY: 9:30 a.m., Sunday
School and confirmation; 10:30
a.m., worship.
WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m., Bible
study and prayer.
GOLDFIELD
UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Rev. Sara Hill, Pastor
Goldfield
THURSDAY, Nov. 15: 9:15
a.m., TOPS meeting, Rose
Room, new members always
welcome; 6 p.m., Support and
Recovery, at Crossroads Min-
istries.
SATURDAY, Nov. 17: 4:30
p.m., community Thanks-
giving worship at Goldfield
School building, followed by
free community Thanksgiving
meal until 7 p.m. (or when the
food is gone.
SUNDAY, Nov. 18: 9:15
a.m., Sunday school for all
ages; 9:45 a.m., choir practice,
east basement; 10:30 a.m.,
worship; 11:30 a.m., fellow-
ship coffee.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21:
9:15 a.m., TOPS, weigh-in
only; Thanksgiving vacation,
NO After-school Story Time.
The regular meeting of the Humboldt United Methodist
Women met at Faith United Methodist Church Nov. 1. After
lunch, Sandy Strachan asked the group to discuss questions
about the many ways they serve others and intentionally or un-
intentionally “witness” to others about their faith. Those ques-
tions generated a lot of discussion at each table.
Did we catch you serving?
Mark Cirks of Gilmore City will graduate from the College
of Chiropractic at Northwestern Health Sciences University in
Bloomington, MN, on Friday, Nov. 16. He was recently named
to Northwestern’s College of Chiropractic Dean’s List. Cirks
and his wife, Stacy, have two children. Cyler is 5 years old and
Ryah is 1 year old. He is the son of Dave and Patti Cirks of
Gilmore City.
Cirks named to Dean's List
This space is available FREE to any non-profit organization wishing to advertise a money-
making affair or announce a meeting or special public event. Just call the Independent
by Monday noon at 332-2514 for insertion.
NOTE: Please check the meeting dates, times and locations and any other
information. In case of error, please contact the Humboldt Independent at 332-2514.
7 O’Clock Kiwanis, every Monday, Family Table, 7 a.m.
Alanon Humboldt Meeting, Congregational UCC of Humboldt Church, 111 N. Taft St.,
(south door), Monday Evenings, 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Alcoholics Anonymous, every Monday evening, 8:00 p.m. at St. John's Parish
Center, Gilmore City.
Alcoholics Anonymous, every Monday evening at 7:00 p.m. at Humboldt County
Courthouse, Dakota City. Contact Number: 890-9136 or 332-1148, leave
message if no answer.
Alzheimers Support Group, first Tuesday, 10:00 a.m., North Care Center, Humboldt.
American Legion Auxiliary, second Monday, City Hall, Dakota City, 2:00 p.m.
American Legion Post 119, first Monday, Legion Bldg., 7 p.m.
Baptist Rebecca Circle, second Wednesday.
Business & Professional Women, fourth Wednesday, dinner, Vinny's BBQ, 5:15 p.m.
Care Center Family Group, third Monday, Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church, 7:00 p.m.
– September-November and January-June
Co-City Bus Board, first Monday, 7 a.m.
Compassionate Friends of North Central Iowa, second Monday, Algona Library,
7:30 p.m. (use west door).
Congregational UCC Women's Fellowship, first Thursday, 12:30 p.m.
Congregational UCC Women’s Fellowship Circles, third Thursday.
Dakota City Worth While Club, second Tuesday, Dakota City, 1:30 p.m.
Des Moines River Restoration Committee, third Thursday each month, 6:30 pm. at
Municipal Building in Dakota City.
Eastern Star Masonic Lodge No. 195, first Tuesday, Masonic Temple, 7:00 p.m.
Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Awareness Meetings, second Thursday of each
month, back room of Curves, 1:30 p.m. - questions? call Jodi at 332-1905
Fort Dodge Chapter of Compassionate Friends, second and fourth Tuesday, First
United Methodist Church office bldg., 1002 1st Ave. N., Fort Dodge, 7:30 p.m.
Fort Dodge Singles Dance, first Friday of each month, Eagles Ballroom, 8 p.m.-12
a.m.
Friendly Visitors of Humboldt County, Staff Meeting, 1st Tuesday, 11:30 a.m. at
Phase 1 Humboldt Homes. Board Meeting: 2nd Wednesday, 8 a.m. at Phase 1
Humboldt Homes.
Honey Bee Quilters, first Saturday of the month, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., at Our Saviour’s
Lutheran Church.
Humboldt Chapter No. 147 Order of the Eastern Star, second Monday, Masonic
Temple, 7:00 p.m.
Humboldt Chapter of the MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Society, first Wednesday of each
month, 7:30 p.m., Junior High School media center.
Humboldt County Fair Board, meets at the fairgrounds the first Monday of each
month at 7:00 p.m.
Humboldt County Genealogical Society, first Wednesday, library, 1:30 p.m.
Humboldt County Historical Association, first Monday, Clancy Building, Humboldt
County Museum, 7:30 p.m.
Humboldt County Humane Society, second Wednesday, Pasquale’s, 7 p.m.
Humboldt County Memorial Hospital Auxiliary Board, second Monday, Sun Room,
Hospital.
Humboldt Garden Club, fourth Tuesday.
Humboldt Historical Preservation Commission, first Tuesday, Humboldt City Hall,
1:00 p.m.
Humboldt Rifle and Pistol Club, second Thursday, 7:30 p.m.
Humboldt Rotary Club, Tuesdays, noon, Miller’s Landing.
Humboldt Women’s Club, first Thursday at 7 p.m. (except September and November),
Faith United Methodist Church.
Jaycees, second and fourth Tuesday each month, 7 p.m., Lomitas.
Just For Me, every Wednesday, Faith United Methodist Church, Gilmore City, 7:30
p.m. Exercise video, Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 6:45 p.m. Free country
line dancing, Sundays, 6:30 p.m.
Kiwanis Aktion Club, second and fourth Tuesday, 5:15 p.m. at Faith United Methodist
Church.
Lions Club, first and third Tuesday of every month at Vinny's in Dakota City, 6:00 p.m.
LUV Iowa, second Monday, Vinny's in Dakota City, 7 p.m.
Methodist UMW Circles, third Thursday.
Methodist UMW General Meeting, first Thursday.
Noon Kiwanis, every Monday, Vinny's BBQ, noon.
OxBow Chapter of Izaak Walton, second Wednesday, OxBow Shelter House, noon
Royal Neighbors, first Tuesday, noon
Three Rivers Trail Council, 2nd Thursday of every month, 7 p.m., OxBow Lodge.
VFW and VFW Auxiliary 5240 Sing-A-Long, fourth Thursday, North and South Care
Centers, 6:15 p.m.
VFW and VFW Auxiliary 5240, third Wednesday, VFW Hall, Dakota City, 7:00 p.m.
We Weavers Club, third Tuesday.
Weight Watchers, every Tuesday, Senior Citizens Center, Weigh-in 9:00 a.m., meeting
9:30 a.m.; Weigh-in 5:30 p.m., meeting 6:00 p.m.
Women's Connection, third Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., nonprofit group.
Zion Lutheran, Humboldt LWML, second Thursday, Day Circle at 9:30 a.m., Evening
Circle at 7:00 p.m.
COMING EVENTS ...
Wednesday, November 21 – United Church of Christ Congregational
Thanksgiving Eve Service, 7:00 p.m.
CORN BELT
POWER
COOPERATIVE
1300 13th St. N.
Humboldt
515-332-2571
513 Sumner Ave.
Humboldt, IA 50548
515-332-2953
www.humboldtinsurance.com
Your “Trusted Choice”
Independent Insurance Agent
Humboldt Ins. Mgmt. Assoc., Inc.
“Your GM Country Store”
Highway 3 East
Humboldt
515-332-2764
Humboldt Downtown
Motor Bank
Gilmore City
www.bankiowabanks.com
Iowa
Tree Service
Year Round Service
Trimming • Removal • Stump Grinding
Insured • Estimates
515.825.3440
Cell 515.851.0035
Jim and Nicky Kvale
Members of Iowa and International Arborist's Assoc.
GOLDFIELD
Junction
Hwy. 3 & 169
Humboldt
515-332-2932
“The way a sandwich
should be.”
Humboldt
North and
South Facilities
515-332-2623
515-332-4104
Quality
First
Member FDIC
www.jetcompany.com
515-332-3117
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 5B
By Kirk Hundertmark
HARRY’S HEATING AND
COOLING HAS NEW
OWNER
John Klein of Bode has pur-
chased the Harry’s Heating
and Cooling business on Main
Street in Livermore from Den-
nis Stalzer as of July 1.
Over the years Harry’s
Heating and Cooling in Liver-
more, has steadily grown to be
one of the most respected and
well known heating, air condi-
tioning and service contractors
serving the needs of residential
and light commercial custom-
ers in the Humboldt County
area.
Harry Stalzer was a W and
H Co-op Service technician
and worked his way up to
Service Manager and was em-
ployed by W and H from 1969
to 1977, at which time he and
his son Dennis opened their
own business, Harry’s Refrig-
eration Service working out of
his garage specializing in com-
mercial refrigeration, Heating
and Cooling. In 1979, they put
up a brand new building at its
current location and moved
their business to Main Street
of Livermore, where they also
started offering plumbing,
electrical and appliance ser-
vice.
Harry passed away on Dec.
1, 1998, at which time his son,
Dennis, took over and changed
the name to Harry’s Heating
and Cooling.
John Klein of Bode has pur-
chased the Harry’s Heating
and Cooling business on Main
Street in Livermore from Den-
nis Stalzer as of July 1. Klein
started with Harry’s Heating
and Cooling on June 5, 1991,
as a service tech/installer.
“All of the current staff is
staying with him,” Klein says.
The current employees are,
Lisa Satern, office reception-
ist, Dale Stalzer, service tech-
nician, Mike Crahan, installer,
and Dennis Stalzer, who will
stay on as a service and install-
er technician.
“They are committed to
providing his customers with
more where she opened Gay-
le’s Beauty Salon in 1972 in
the old barn, which had been
“The Barnett” a restaurant. In
1975, she moved her beauty
salon to the basement of her
home. Left to cherish Gayle’s
memory is her husband of
38 years, Dick Foth and two
daughters.
CITY OF LIVERMORE
WELCOMES
NEWCOMERS TO
LIVERMORE
The Mayor of Livermore,
Robert Connor, welcomes
the following new citizens to
Livermore; Kelly and Deanna
Frock, John Smith, and Justin
and Jennifer Collins and fam-
ily.
The City of Livermore
maintains its small town
charm with many parks and
swimming pool, and short
commuting time to Algona and
Humboldt.
Livermore News
John Klein
honest, dependable service
you can rely on, and treating
his customers exactly how
we would want to be treated-
with fairness and respect,”
Klein says. He also says that
business has been really good
and would really like to expand
the business and see about put-
ting another work truck on the
road.
LIVERMORE AMERICAN
LEGION HONORS
VETERANS FOR
VETERANS DAY
Last Sunday, on Veterans
Day Nov. 11, the Livermore
American Legion Otto Field
Post 415 honored their veter-
ans with Certificates of Honor
and Appreciation for their ser-
vice to the United States. Vet-
erans Day is a day for America
to remember her military ser-
vice members.
Spotlight on local veterans
was shown by handing out
“Certificates of Honor” that
were presented to all of the
Legion members. A special
certificate was given to Kenny
Underberg for his 60 years of
service with the color guard
and also to Dennis Behounek,
Lyle Nelson, Kenny Bormann,
Eugene and Irvin Mertz for
putting out flags on Memorial
Day for Livermore and St. Joe.
ZEIMETS ATTEND
GRANDSON’S SOCCER
GAME IN KANSAS CITY
Ron and Mavis Zeimet
of rural Livermore went to
watch their grandson, Andy,
play soccer in the State Tour-
naments. The Bishop Miege
High School soccer team won
their semifinals, Friday night,
Nov. 2, 4 to 1. They played
for the state championship at
the Hummer Sports complex
in Kansas City on Saturday,
Nov. 3, in Topeka, which they
won the Class 5A soccer high
school championship game,
3 to 1, against Liberal Kan-
sas High School. They also
watched one of Zoey’s games
Saturday morning.
LIVERMORE LOSES
LONG TIME RESIDENT
AND BUSINESS
OPERATOR
Last Sunday at the Liver-
more American Legion pan-
cake breakfast, the Livermore
American Legion Ladies Aux-
iliary had displayed a flower
that was given in memory
of Gayle Foth of Livermore
who passed away on Wednes-
day, Nov. 7. Gayle had been
a longtime resident of Liver-
The Humboldt-Dakota City Noon Kiwanis Club do-
nated $150 to the Humboldt Academic Boosters. Joni
Torkelson (left), secretary of the Academic Boosters, is
shown accepting the check from Donnie Wind, a Noon
Kiwanis member. Submitted photo.
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• GAN Telephone Service Required •
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Your Local, Friendly
Connection for
Humboldt Lions Club
30th Annual Radio Auction
Tuesday, Nov. 20 • 7-10 P.M.
on KHBT 97.7 FM Radio
INSTRUCTIONS TO BIDDERS
On your first call, you will be assigned an identification number. Please
use that number on all your subsequent bids. Please always give
number and name of item when you bid. Please bid only on the items
listed for the current hour. Thank you for your participation.
SESSION 1 - 7-8 P.M.
1. Born Free Motorcoach - matching cap (or visor) & jacket ....................................... $64
2. Bank Iowa - $50 U.S. Series EE savings bond ......................................................... $25
3. Floral Creations - gift certificate ............................................................................... $40
4. Fireside Restaurant - gift certificate ......................................................................... $25
5. Fridley Theatres - 7 certificates for buy one get one free theatre admission ........... $28
6. Humboldt Engraving & Gifts - gift certificate............................................................ $25
7. Humboldt Auto Wash - 5 car wash tokens ............................................................... $25
8. Worthington Insurance & Real Estate - 2 boxes of 15 golf balls .............................. $44
9. Kirk Whittlesey - complete eye exam ....................................................................... $80
10. West Fork Services - four 12 oz. bags assorted coffees, 2 packets of baked goods
mixes, 2 kitchen utensils, assorted Christmas decorations..................................... $50
11. Wempen’s Garden Center - shade tree .................................................................... $90
12. Vinny’s BBQ - gift certificate ..................................................................................... $20
13. Verizon Wireless Brian Gargano - gift certificate to be used at either store ............ $25
14. Unkies Restaurant - gift certificate ........................................................................... $25
15. Tri-County Agronomy - XL brown Pioneer sweatshirt & hat ...................................... $30
16. The Sweetest Things Bakery - 2 doz. decorated cookies (formerly Wendy’s Delicious
Cookies) ................................................................................................................... $17
17. Sundance Lanes - gift certificate ............................................................................. $25
18. Springvale Salon on Main Linda Hanson - man’s or woman’s hairstyle ................... $20
19. Springvale Motors - 5 qt. oil change, filter & lube .................................................... $38
20. Somewhere in Tyme - stemmed votive white flower made in Romania handcrafted
crystal .................................................................................................................... $125
21 Sheree’s Hallmark Shop - instant “In Memory” scrapbook, “A Life to Remember” ... $50
22. Scatter Joy - purse, brown sparkle front, short & long strap, great for all year round . $60
23. SaraLee’s Hair Affair - 1 male and 1 female haircut ($11 & $13) ............................. $24
24. S&L Equipment - 1/16 Bruder Co. Massey Ferguson 7480 tractor .......................... $31
25. Rustix - three $10 gift cards ..................................................................................... $30
26. River Valley Orchards & Winery - two $10 gift certificates for any merchandise ..... $20
27. The Revue - set of 4 Corelle dishes with floral design ............................................. $24
28. Reekers Cleaning Service - air duct cleaning .......................................................... $50
29. Radon Solutions of Iowa, Inc. - in home continuous electronic radon monitoring home
test ......................................................................................................................... $125
30. Born Free Motorcoach - matching cap (or visor) & jacket ....................................... $64
31. Power Co-op Employees Credit Union - giftcard ..................................................... $25
32. Pizza Hut - 3 large pizzas ......................................................................................... $32
33. Pet Shed - shampoo & toy for your squeaky clean pooch ....................................... $20
34. Personali-Tees - Humboldt Wildcat sweatshirt ......................................................... $25
35. Pasquale’s Italian Restaurant - gift certificate .......................................................... $25
36. Pasquale’s Frozen Food Service - case of six 12” single topping pizzas ................ $26
37. Oaks Garden Spot & Rasmussen Lawn Care - weed blaster pro lawn sprayer, saves
your back from bending over .................................................................................. $24
38. Edward Jones Tony Christensen - camel brown microfiber 50”x60” sherpa throw . $26
39. Casey’s General Store - $50 gift card ...................................................................... $50
40. Audio Hearing Aid Center - 1 box of batteries, any size .......................................... $40
ITEM DONOR DESCRIPTION VALUE
SESSION 2 - 8-9 P.M.
ITEM DONOR DESCRIPTION VALUE
ITEM DONOR DESCRIPTION VALUE
SESSION 3 - 9-10 P.M.
Phone Your
Bids To
332-1451
Phone Your Bids To 332-1451 - Please Keep This Sheet For Your Reference During The Sale
100. Vinny’s BBQ - gift certificate ................................................................................... $20
101. Unkie’s Restaurant - gift certificate ......................................................................... $25
102. SaraLee’s Hair Affair - 1 male and 1 female haircut ($11 & $13) ........................... $24
103. River Valley Orchards & Winery - gift certificate for rental of party room ............... $50
104. Reekers Cleaning Service - air duct cleaning ........................................................ $50
105. Radon Solutions of Iowa, Inc. - in home continuous electronic radon monitoring
home test ............................................................................................................... $125
106. Pasquale’s Frozen Food Service - case of six 12” single topping pizzas .............. $26
107. Oaks Garden Spot & Rasmussen Lawn Care - weed blaster pro lawn sprayer, saves
your back from bending over .................................................................................. $24
108. Miller’s Landing - gift certificate ............................................................................. $15
109. Humboldt Vet Clinic - exam and vaccinations for canine or feline ......................... $70
110. Humboldt Engraving & Gifts - gift certificate.......................................................... $25
111. Humboldt Auto Wash - 5 car wash tokens ............................................................. $25
112. Gold Eagle Co-op Thor - 2XL goatskin leather gloves & XL Luminator ThermoSock
insulation gloves and hat ......................................................................................... $25
113. Fridley Theatres - 7 certificates for buy one get one free theatre admission ......... $28
114. Fireside Restaurant - gift certificate ....................................................................... $25
115. Edward Jones Tony Christensen - large camouflage cheyenne dri-duck hooded
jacket ....................................................................................................................... $45
116. Born Free Motorcoach - matching cap (or visor) & jacket ..................................... $64
117. Abens-Marty-Curran - 5 lb. ABC fire extinguisher .................................................. $60
118. W&H Co-op - gift card to Cabela’s ......................................................................... $25
119. Bomgaars (formerly Shoppers Supply) - alarm clock ............................................ $30
120. Roller Country Joe & Maria Hadar - season pass to Roller Country Skating Rink
(includes skate rental) ........................................................................................... $280
121. Hy-Vee - Monster Fruit Basket (cheese, crackers, candy, fruit) ............................. $60
41. OK Tire - 4 tire rotation and balance ........................................................................ $40
42. North Park Family Dentistry - Crest white strips supreme professional whitening kit . $66
43. The New Image - 10 tan sessions and bottle of tanning lotion ................................ $30
44. Modern Woodman of America - 1 doz. Pinnacle Gold golf balls ............................. $25
45. Miller’s Landing - gift certificate ............................................................................... $15
46. Vinny’s BBQ - gift certificate ..................................................................................... $20
47. Meyer Photography - two $50 gift certificates on your next portrait order ............. $100
48. Martin Marietta & John’s Ag Service - load of 1” road stone .................................. $225
49. Long Term Medical Supply - contour lumbar cushion ............................................. $20
50. Kollmorgen Tree Farm - Christmas tree .................................................................... $24
51. K.C. Nielsen Ltd. - 1/16 530 John Deere tractor ...................................................... $32
52. Johnny’s Service - oil change & filter, up to 5 qt. ..................................................... $30
53. John’s Ag Service - load of black dirt delivered free within 5 miles of Humboldt .. $200
54.Jensen Trailers LTD - maximum security lock for trailer ............................................ $50
55. Hy-Capacity Enginering & Manufacturing Inc. - Knipex multi-purpose pliers set . $115
56. Humboldt Vet Clinic - exam and vaccinations for canine or feline ........................... $70
57. Humboldt Realty - Pampered Chef cookie sheet & cooling rack ............................. $30
58. Humboldt Red Power - IH holiday snowman figurine .............................................. $32
59. Humboldt Mutual Insurance - 5 lb.fire extinguisher ................................................. $60
60. Humboldt Mini Storage - 2 months of 10’x20’ storage ........................................... $120
61. Humboldt Family Aquatic Center - 5-punch swimming pool pass for 2013 season .. $30
62. Humboldt Eye Clinic - men’s or women’s Skechers sunglasses .............................. $35
63. Born Free Motorcoach - matching cap (or visor) & jacket ....................................... $64
64. Humboldt Engraving & Gifts - gift certificate............................................................ $25
65. Humboldt County REC & Corn Belt Cooperative - electric Presto heat dish ........... $75
66. Humboldt County ISU Extension Service - 2013 garden calendar, Home Landscape
colored book, Perennials for Sun colored book ....................................................... $18
67. Humboldt Auto Wash - 5 car wash tokens ............................................................... $25
68. Hjelmeland Flooring - 6’5”x6’3” floral area rug ....................................................... $149
69. Hardees of Humboldt - packet of 15 food coupons for tacos, chicken & children’s
meals ....................................................................................................................... $35
70. Hair Studio 706 Ashley Dreyer - Shellac nail service ............................................... $25
71. Hadar Manufacturing - sports bag of various items................................................. $25
72. Goldfield Access Network/Goldfield Telephone/North Central Wireless - iWireless cell
phone & free 30 day unlimited talk & text - no contract ........................................ $103
73. Gold Eagle Co-op Thor - 4 bags softener salt (picked up in Thor) .......................... $26
74. Reekers Cleaning Service - carpet cleaning ............................................................ $50
75. SaraLee’s Hair Affair - 1 male and 1 female haircut ($11 & $13) ............................. $24
76. Fridley Theatres - 6 certificates for buy one get one free theatre admission ........... $24
77. Floral Creations - gift certificate ............................................................................... $40
78. Pasquale’s Frozen Food Service - case of six 12” single topping pizzas ................ $26
79. Casey’s General Store - 1 large single topping pizza & 1 doz. donuts.................... $19
80. Audio Hearing Aid Center - hearing exam ............................................................... $75
Hog Slat Inc.
Humboldt Rent-All
Jean’s Collectables
Jergens Body & Alignment
Mason-Lindhart Funeral Home
North Central Title Company of Humboldt
Northwest Bank
O’Hair by Jodi Giddings
Olson & Humboldt Co. Abstract Co. Inc.
Prime Refrigeration
Lee Smith Insurance Inc.
Smith Real Estate Inc.
Syntex Industries
Vitzthum Electric
THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES HAVE
GIVEN MONETARY DONATIONS
Absolute Pest Management
ADF Systems, Ltd.
Ag Parts LTD.
TP Anderson & Company
Marc Arends, Robert Lee &
Ashley Emick
Baker, Johnsen & Sandblom
The Bootery & The Image
Erpelding Voigt & Co LLP
Fallesen Auto & Electric
Gronbach Construction Co
Hanisch LTD.
Harmon Animal Clinic
Hoag’s Plumbing & Heating Inc. ”We Serve”
OUR SPECIAL THANKS
to KHBT Radio, Humboldt Reminder and Humboldt
Independent for their generous contribution of advertising
space and time. Special thanks to Worthington Insurance
and Bank Iowa for the use of their rooms.
to the Sponsors of KHBT who very kindly
relinquished their program this evening.
THANKS
81. Fastenal Stores - 30 LED flashlight, rechargeable in house or car ........................ $36
82. Farm Bureau Financial Services - 1 doz. Titleist Pro VI golf balls .......................... $45
83. Fareway Stores - gift card ...................................................................................... $20
84. EZ Trim - 2 weeks exercise ($15) also 9x13 angel food cake ($20) ...................... $35
85. Dream Carriage Rides - sleigh ride for 6 ............................................................... $72
86. Dean’s Auto Sales - wash & vacuum ...................................................................... $25
87. Dairy Queen - 8” ice cream cake ........................................................................... $22
88. Born Free Motorcoach - matching cap (or visor) & jacket ..................................... $64
89. Curves - one month membership to new members only ($36), 5 tans ($20) ......... $56
90. Crossroads of Humboldt Cenex - 1 case of 10W-40 oil ......................................... $45
91. Cloud 9 Massage Therapy & Skin Care - mini refresh facial & one intro starter kit for
skin type of your choice ......................................................................................... $103
92. Chantland Co. (Pulley & Rollers) - brown Carhartt winter jacket ............................ $50
93. Carlsonstorage.com - 3 months of 10’x20’ self-storage when space is available $165
94. Caribbean Coffeehouse & Gifts - gift basket ......................................................... $25
95. Blacktop Service - 10 ton road stone delivered in Humboldt County .................. $175
96. Bank Iowa - $50 U.S. Series EE savings bond ....................................................... $25
97. B&N Auto - oil filter & grease lubrication for auto ................................................... $30
98. Ameriprise Financial Eric Davidson - office putter set (takedown putter, golf balls &
“hole” to practice putting wherever you want) ......................................................... $50
99. Abens-Marty-Curran Agency - 2 all day passes to Adventureland for ‘13 season $78
6B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
Isabella Qi, one of Lori Runkle’s 10th grade AP Eng-
lish students at Beijing No. 4 High School’s Internation-
al Campus in China, held up Runkle’s absentee ballot
in their classroom on Nov. 5, for other classmates to see.
Students in China are concerned about Barack Obama
and Mitt Romney’s stance on America’s relationship
with their country. Submitted photo.
Teaching AP English at Bei-
jing No. 4 High School’s In-
ternational Campus in Beijing,
China poses some daily chal-
lenges including messages lost
in translation and government
blocked websites like YouTube
and Facebook, but I never sus-
pected voting in the presiden-
tial election would be one of
those international incidents.
I felt quite responsible and
very American requesting my
absentee ballot in mid-October
2012, but when the ballot had
not arrived by regular mail on
Nov. 1, panic seeped into my
first-class citizen living abroad
plans. My initial inquiry e-
mail response about the bal-
lot’s whereabouts from Hum-
boldt County Auditor Peggy
Rice was that it was mailed out
in a special military/overseas
voter envelope on Oct. 17. Her
following e-mail in early No-
vember went something like
this:
Lori – Yes your ballot is in
the mail. You can vote if it ar-
rives after the election but it
will not count, Iowa law re-
quires that all absentee bal-
lots have a postmark the day
before the election, which
would be Nov. 5 and arrive in
the Auditor’s office by the time
of the canvas, which will be on
Tuesday, Nov. 13.
I know it is expensive to
send things by Fed-Ex etc., but
it is an option you can use.
You have two options:
1. Wait and see if your
mailed ballot arrives, make
sure it is postmarked by the
day before the election (Nov.
5), mail it back to us and hope
it arrives by Nov. 13, the last
day to count any absentee bal-
lots.
Getting out the vote
in Beijing, China
2. Ask for an e-mail ballot,
print it off, vote it and send it
to us postmarked no later than
Nov. 5 (the sooner the better)
and hope that it arrives by
Nov. 13.
I’m sorry that your choices
are limited at this time. Let me
know what you would like to
do.
That was not the reassuring
or inexpensive answer I de-
sired, but since I knew many
friends who had used a get out
the vote e-mail option while
living overseas, I asked Ms.
Rice about this alternative.
With the speedy and efficient
assistance of Ms. Rice, the
presidential First Class Mail
Official Absentee Balloting
Material arrived from Dakota
City, attached as a PDF file to
my Yahoo e-mail on Nov. 3.
All I needed to do was print the
documents, sign my name on
the appropriate line, provide
an address, fill in the corre-
sponding presidential bubble,
scan the completed form, and
e-mail it to a designated ‘get-
the-ballot-to-the-courthouse
on time’ man. The clock was
ticking until election day.
The final step of the voting
process involved Tom Tierney,
my designated ballot delivery
hero, printing and delivering
the electronic right and privi-
lege to the Humboldt County
Courthouse on Nov. 5, with
one day to spare.
The final e-mail I received
from Peggy Rice was on Mon-
day, Nov. 5.
It said: Lori – Tom delivered
your completed ballot to us to-
day!
Hurrah! I am now an official
Iowa e-voter living in Beijing.
... you are reminded that Humboldt and Dakota
City have an ordinance regulating the operation
of snowmobiles within the city limits.
Snowmobiles may be operated on any
city street in Humboldt and Dakota City
except the following:
HUMBOLDT
Street: From: To:
Fifth Street North Sumner Avenue Iowa Highway No. 3
Fifth Street South Sumner Avenue End of Street
First Avenue South Second Street Sumner Avenue S.W.
Sixth Avenue North Second Street U.S. Highway No. 169
Ninth Street North Sumner Avenue Iowa Highway No. 3
Third Avenue N. Ninth Street U.S. Highway No. 169
Sumner Avenue All
U.S. Highway No. 169 All
Iowa Highway No. 3 All
DAKOTA CITY
Main Street
With the arrival of snow, please be aware
of the rules set down by the Humboldt
and Dakota City Ordinances ...
1. Unplowed streets. Snowmobiles may be operated upon streets which have not been plowed during
the snow season.
2. Parks and other public land. Snowmobiles shall not be operated on any publicly owned property
within the City of Humboldt, whether owned by the city, county, school, state or United States,
except streets herein designated or in city parks in areas designated and in such manner and fashion
as may be authorized by the park commission hereby authorized to adjudicate and promulgate
regulations permitting, controlling or prohibiting the operation upon any areas under its control
and after adoption of the same, to cause the same to be published in the newspaper in which this
ordinance is published and to file a copy of the same with the clerk to be by him retained for
inspection at his office by anyone at their request.
3. Private property. No snowmobile shall be operated upon private property without the express
consent of the owner thereof.
4. Sidewalk or parking. No snowmobiles shall be operated upon the public sidewalk, nor shall they
be operated upon that portion of the street located between the curb line and the sidewalk or
property line commonly referred to as the “Parking,” except for purposes of crossing the same to
a public street upon which operation is authorized by the chapter.
MANNER OF OPERATION. No person shall operate a snowmobile
in the city except as hereafter provided.
1. Registration. No snowmobile shall be operated in the city unless registered pursuant to state law
and unless the identifying number set forth in the registration is displayed on each side of the
snowmobile.
2. Equipment. All snowmobiles shall be equipped with muffling devices, lights and other equipment
required by state law or regulation.
3. Traffic code. Snowmobile operators shall observe all state and local traffic control regulations and
devices and shall possess a valid Iowa operator’s license.
4. Speed. Snowmobiles shall not be operated on streets at a speed in excess of that posted nor at any
time at a rate of speed greater than reasonable and proper under all existing circumstances.
5. Careless operation. No person shall operate a snowmobile in a careless, reckless, or negligent
manner so as to endanger the person or property of another or to cause injury or damage thereto.
6. Intoxicated. No person shall operate a snowmobile while under the influence of intoxicating liquor
or narcotics or habit-forming drugs.
7. Lights. No person shall operate a snowmobile without a lighted headlight and taillight when required
for safety.
8. Unattended. No operator or owner shall leave or allow a snowmobile to be or remain unattended
on public property while the motor is running or with keys in the ignition switch.
9. A snowmobile may make a direct crossing of prohibited street or highway provided:
A. The crossing is made at an angle of approximately ninety degrees to the direction of the street
or highway and at a place where no obstruction prevents a quick and safe crossing;
B. The snowmobile is brought to a complete stop before crossing the shoulder or main traveling
way of the street or highway;
C. The driver yields the right of way to all oncoming traffic which constitutes an immediate hazard.
10. Minors. Persons between the ages of twelve (12) and fourteen (14) must have a valid safety certificate
issued by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and be accompanied by an adult over the age
of 18.
11. Hours of operation limited. No snowmobile shall be operated in the city between the hours of 12:01
a.m. and 7:00 a.m. except for emergency situations or for loading and unloading from a transport
trailer.
12. Thaw ban. Snowmobiles shall not be operated during a publicized thaw ban in areas posted to
prohibit such operation nor at any time upon the streets of the city during the period from April
1 to September 30 of each year.
13. Single file. Snowmobiles shall be driven in a single file manner in the proper lane of traffic as close
to the curb or edge of roadway as is possible under existing conditions.
14. Dead man throttle. No snowmobile shall be operated within the city unless equipped with a “dead
man” throttle which when pressure is removed from the accelerator or throttle causes the engine
to be disengaged from the drive mechanism.
15. Towing. No item shall be towed by a snowmobile unless coupled to said snowmobile by a rigid tow
bar.
i d d h H b ld d D k
Humboldt Independent
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Legals
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 7B
NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL,
OF APPOINTMENT OF
EXECUTORS, AND NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
Probate No. ESPR010759
THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF INA L. CLOWES,
DECEASED
To All Persons Interested in the Estate
of Ina L. Clowes, Deceased, who died on
or about November 3, 2012:
You are hereby notified that on the
7th day of November, 2012, the last
will and testament of Ina L. Clowes,
deceased, bearing date of the 10th day
of May, 2007, was admitted to probate
in the above named court and that James
F. Clowes, Robert B. Clowes, and Anne
C. Conover, were appointed executors of
the estate. Any action to set aside the will
must be brought in the district court of
said county within the later to occur of
four months from the date of the second
publication of this notice or one month
from the date of mailing of this notice
to all heirs of the decedent and devisees
under the will whose identities are rea-
sonably ascertainable, or thereafter be
forever barred.
Notice is further given that all per-
sons indebted to the estate are requested
to make immediate payment to the un-
NOTICE OF PROOF OF WILL,
WITHOUT ADMINISTRATION
Probate No. ESPR010760
THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF HAROLD EDWARD GREBE
DECEASED
To all persons interested in the estate
of Harold Edward Grebe, deceased, who
died on or about October 13, 2012:
You are hereby notified that on No-
vember 6, 2012, the Last Will and Tes-
tament of Harold Edward Grebe, bear-
ing the date of December 8, 1983, was
admitted to probate in the above-named
court and there will be no present ad-
ministration of the estate. Any action
to set aside the Will must be brought in
the District Court of the above County
within the later to occur of four months
from the date of the second publication
of this Notice or one month from the date
of mailing of this Notice to the surviving
spouse and all heirs of the decedent and
devisees under the Will whose identities
are reasonably ascertainable, or thereaf-
ter be forever barred.
Dated this 6th day of November,
2012.
Janelle Groteluschen,
Clerk of Court
Robert E. Lee,
AT#0004664
Attorney for Estate,
Arends and Lee
P.O. Box 644
Humboldt, IA 50548
Date of second publication: 22nd day
of November, 2012.
I-26-2
NOTICE OF PROOF OF WILL,
WITHOUT ADMINISTRATION
Probate No. ESPR010755
THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF CHARLES A. JOINER,
DECEASED
To all persons interested in the Estate
of Charles A. Joiner, deceased, who died
on or about October 9, 2012:
You are hereby notified that on Oc-
tober 30, 2012, the Last Will and Testa-
ment of Charles A. Joiner, bearing the
date of November 3, 2006, was admit-
ted to probate in the above-named court
and there will be no present administra-
tion of the estate. Any action to set aside
the Will must be brought in the District
Court of the above County within the lat-
er to occur of four months from the date
of the second publication of this Notice
or one month from the date of mailing
of this Notice to the surviving spouse
and all heirs of the decedent and devi-
sees under the Will whose identities are
reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter be
forever barred.
Dated this 30th day of October, 2012.
Janelle Groteluschen,
Clerk of Court
Marc D. Arends,
AT#0000550
Attorney for Estate,
Arends and Lee
P.O. Box 644
Humboldt, IA 50548
Date of second publication: 15th day
of November, 2012.
I-25-2
NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL,
OF APPOINTMENT OF
EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
Probate No. ESPR010756
THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF BERNADINE KISSINGER,
DECEASED
To All Persons Interested in the Estate
of Bernadine Kissinger, Deceased, who
died on or about October 24, 2012:
You are hereby notified that on the
1st day of November, 2012, the last will
and testament of Bernadine Kissinger,
deceased, bearing date of the 9th day of
April 1990, was admitted to probate in
the above named court and that Cheryl
Graaf was appointed executor of the es-
tate. Any action to set aside the will must
be brought in the district court of said
county within the later to occur of four
months from the date of the second pub-
lication of this notice or one month from
the date of mailing of this notice to all
heirs of the decedent and devisees under
the will whose identities are reasonably
ascertainable, or thereafter be forever
barred.
Notice is further given that all per-
sons indebted to the estate are requested
to make immediate payment to the un-
dersigned, and creditors having claims
against the estate shall file them with the
clerk of the above named district court,
as provided by law, duly authenticated,
for allowance, and unless so filed by the
later to occur of four months from the
second publication of this notice or one
month from the date of mailing of this
notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid)
a claim is thereafter forever barred.
Dated this 1st day of November,
2012.
Cheryl Graaf,
Executor of the Estate
502 5th Street North,
Humboldt, IA 50548
Brian R. Johnsen,
ICIS PIN No: AT0003861
Attorney for Executor,
Baker, Johnsen and Sandblom
P.O. Box 337
Humboldt, IA 50548
Date of second publication: 15th day
of November, 2012.
I-25-2
LUVERNE COMMUNITY SCHOOL
School Board Proceeding
LuVerne, Iowa
The LuVerne Board of Education
met in regular session November 7, with
Collins, Cunningham, Lawson, Legler,
McPeak present. Others present included
Superintendent Fey, Principal Rotert,
Secretary Wempen, Allyson Thompson,
Eller Shipman. President Lawson called
the meeting to order at 7 p.m.
Motion by Legler, seconded by Mc-
Peak, to approve the amended agenda,
adding Corn Belt Conference, resigna-
tion, and open enrollment. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
Motion by McPeak, seconded by
Collins, to approve the minutes from the
previous meeting. Motion carried unani-
mously.
Motion by Cunningham, seconded
by McPeak, to approve monthly bills
for General $15,861.12; Activity - $50;
Management - $781.50; PPEL - $602;
Nutrition - $6,423.47; Medical Deduct-
ible - $41; Flex - $234.55. Motion car-
ried unanimously.
Superintendent Fey shared projected
enrollment/budget figures with the
board.
Motion by Collins, seconded by Cun-
ningham, to accept the resignation of
Paul Garman as Jr. High football coach.
Motion carried unanimously.
Motion by McPeak, seconded by
Legler, to approve the request for On-
Time Funding Modified Allowable
Growth for Increasing Enrollment. Mo-
tion carried unanimously.
Motion by Collins, seconded by Cun-
ningham, to accept the bid from McPeak
Trenching for snow removal. McPeak
abstained from voting. Motion carried.
Motion by Legler, seconded by Cun-
ningham, to approve payment of addi-
tional bills received and due this month.
Motion carried unanimously.
Motion by McPeak, seconded by
Cunningham, to accept the SIAC/CTE
committee recommendations as present-
ed. Motion carried unanimously.
Meeting adjourned at 8:45 p.m.
Next meeting will be December 12, at
7 p.m.
LeAnn K. Wempen
LuVerne School Board Secretary
I-26-1
ORIGINAL NOTICE
IOWA DISTRICT COURT
Court Case DM NO. CDOM001700
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF JUANA
CASTRO SANTIAGO AND
ESTEBAN SANTOS CANSECO
Upon the Petition of
JUANA CASTRO SANTIAGO,
Petitioner
And Concerning
ESTEBAN SANTOS CANSECO,
Respondent
TO THE ABOVE NAMED RE-
SPONDENT:
You are hereby notified that there is
now on file in the office of the Clerk of
the above Court, a Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage in the above-entitled
action, naming you as the Respondent in
this action. The attorney for Petitioner,
is, Sonia Parras Konrad, whose address
is 2925 Ingersoll Avenue, Suite 7, Des
Moines, IA, 50312, telephone no. (515)
255-9317, facsimile no. (515) 255-9371.
You are further notified that un-
less, within 20 days after service of this
Original Notice upon you, you serve, and
within a reasonable time thereafter, file
a written motion or answer in the Iowa
District Court for Humboldt County at
the Humboldt County Courthouse in
Dakota City, Iowa, judgment may be
rendered for the action demanded in the
Petition.
If you require the assistance of aux-
iliary aids or services to participate in
court because of a disability, immedi-
ately call your district ADA coordina-
tor at 515-286-3754. (If you are hearing
impaired call Relay Iowa TTY at l-800-
735-2942.)
Janelle Groteluschen,
Clerk of the Humboldt County
Dakota City, IA 50529
IMPORTANT
YOU ARE ADVISED TO SEEK
LEGAL ADVICE AT ONCE TO PRO-
TECT YOUR I INTERESTS.
I-24-3
COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS
City of Humboldt
Humboldt, Iowa
The Humboldt City Council met in
regular session on Monday, November
5, 2012, in the Council Chambers of the
Humboldt Municipal Building. Mayor
Walter Jensen called the meeting to order
at 5:30 p.m. Council Members present:
Goodell, Sleiter, Boomgarden, Rusher,
and Hadar.
Motion by Rusher, seconded by Ha-
dar, to approve the agenda as printed. (5)
Ayes, motion carried.
Motion by Boomgarden, seconded by
Goodell, to approve the minutes of the
October 15, 2012 regular Council meet-
ing. (5) Ayes, motion carried.
Motion by Boomgarden, seconded
by Sleiter, to approve the Treasurer’s
Monthly Investment Report and the Oc-
tober Treasurer’s Report. (5) Ayes, mo-
tion carried.
Motion by Goodell, seconded by Ha-
dar, to approve the claims for October.
(5) Ayes, motion carried.
Motion by Boomgarden, seconded
by Hadar, to approve the following
proposed Resolution No. 2012-126: “A
RESOLUTION APPROVING PAY ES-
TIMATE NO. 4 FROM INDUSTRIAL
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY, INC. OF
FARGO, NORTH DAKOTA IN THE
AMOUNT OF $262,089.80 FOR THE
2012 HUMBOLDT WATER TREAT-
MENT PLANT IMPROVEMENT
PROJECT.”
Roll Call Vote: Ayes – Goodell,
Sleiter, Boomgarden, Rusher, and Hadar.
Motion carried.
Motion by Sleiter, seconded by
Goodell, to approve the following pro-
posed Resolution No. 2012-127: “A
RESOLUTION APPROVING THE
ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT FOR
FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012 FOR THE
CITY OF HUMBOLDT, IOWA.”
Roll Call Vote: Ayes – Sleiter, Boom-
garden, Rusher, Hadar, and Goodell.
Motion carried.
Motion by Boomgarden, seconded
by Goodell, to approve the following
proposed Resolution No. 2012-128:
“A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE
FINAL PLANS AND SPECIFICA-
TIONS FOR THE DEMOLITION OF
PUBLIC PROPERTY, AND DIRECT-
ING THE CITY CLERK TO PUBLISH
THE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND LETTING AND SET 5:30 P.M.,
MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012, AS
THE TIME AND DATE FOR A PUB-
LIC HEARING TO REVIEW BIDS RE-
CEIVED.”
Roll Call Vote: Ayes – Boomgarden,
Rusher, Hadar, Goodell, and Sleiter. Mo-
tion carried.
Other Items Discussed: City Ad-
ministrator – Commended the Library,
Chamber of Commerce, and Recreation
Department on the programs offered.
Hadar – Reported that he attended a 4-H
Youth Partnership State Council meet-
ing which provided some good ideas
for working with kids in the community.
Mayor – Asked about alternate ways to
schedule burn dates to consider weather
conditions.
Motion by Goodell, seconded by
Sleiter, to schedule Monday, November
19, 2012, at 5:30 p.m., as the date and
time for the next regular meeting of the
Humboldt City Council and to adjourn
this session at 5:53 p.m. (5) Ayes, motion
carried.
Walter Jensen, Mayor
Attest: Gloria J. Christensen, City Clerk
I-26-1
COUNCIL WORK SESSION
City of Humboldt
Humboldt, Iowa
The Humboldt City Council met in a
work session on Monday, November 5,
2012, in the Council Chambers of the
Humboldt Municipal Building. Mayor
Walter Jensen called the meeting to
order at 5 p.m. Council Members pres-
ent: Sleiter, Boomgarden, Rusher, and
Hadar. Others present: City Administra-
tor Aaron Burnett and City Clerk Gloria
Christensen, Humboldt Schools Superin-
tendent Greg Darling, and Tom Simpson.
The Council discussed options for
traffic control at the intersection of
Highway 169 and Wildcat Road, near
the high school and new middle school.
Representatives from the school district
participated in the discussion, which in-
cluded suggestions about lowering the
speed limit in the area along with traffic
control signs or signals.
The Council then discussed the estab-
lishment of a 28(E) agreement with the
school district for the maintenance of
the old football field property and briefly
reviewed animal control revenues and
expenditures.
The Work Session ended at 5:30 p.m.
Walter Jensen, Mayor
Attest:
Gloria J. Christensen, City Clerk
I-26-1
COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS
City of Gilmore City
Gilmore City, Iowa
The Gilmore City Council met in reg-
ular session on November 7, 2012, at the
Gilmore City Hall. Mayor Pro Tem Low-
ell Johnson called the meeting to order
at 6:30 p.m. Council members present
were: Johnson, Dickey, Smith, Gafford,
Hoover.
Dickey moved to approve the consent
agenda as follows:
• Approval of the Agenda
• Monthly Clerk’s Report
• Minutes of the October 8 and 16,
2012 Council Meeting.
• Claims for October and November
bills to be allowed for November 2012
payment
Motion was seconded by Hoover.
Vote: Ayes- Hoover, Gafford, Smith,
Johnson. Nays- 0. Abstain- 0. Absent-0.
Motion carried.
Claims
Claims Paid - To Be Approved
Aramark - Uniforms and office
rugs........................................$256.32
Bennett Sanitation - Roll offs for Clean
Up Days (11) ........................3,810.00
Better Homes and Gardens - Lib ...20.00
CenturyLink - City Hall Phone/Fax and
Fire Station .............................265.55
EFTPS - Fed/FICA
Withholding .........................3,117.73
Entertainment Weekly - Library .....20.00
Holiday Inn - IMFOA for Chris ...201.93
IA League of Cities - Budget class for
Chris .........................................30.00
Iowa Dept of Revenue - State
Withholding ...........................473.00
IA Dept. of Revenue - Sales Tax ..890.00
IA One Call ...................................21.60
IPERS - Retirement fund ..........1,885.49
Lana Lewis - Lib mileage ............166.50
Chris McKee - Mileage 4 class and water
sample to Storm Lake .............203.74
MidAmerican Energy - Electric for ALL
City properties......................1,321.26
Midwest Living - Library ...............19.97
Payroll - 1st Checks of the
month ...................................4,791.90
Payroll - 2nd ..............................3,437.62
Payroll - monthly -Mayor
cleaning ...................................176.34
PCC - Ambulance Billing Service .61.06
Petty Cash - City Hall ..................100.00
Post Master - Postage for LMI
Surveys ......................................90.00
Publishers Clearing House - Lib ....18.67
Wellmark ...................................1,757.08
Total Claims Paid - To Be
Approved ........................$18,783.89
Claims To Be Paid
Aramark - uniforms and rugs .....$136.98
Arnold Motor Supply- ....................50.83
Bankers Trust - Interest on 2006 Sewer
Project ..................................4,112.50
Bennett Recycling - Recycling
only .........................................750.00
Bennett Sanitation - Garbage/Dumpster
pick up only .........................2,938.75
BV Stationery - office supplies ....142.25
CDW-G - City Hall Clerk
Comp ....................................1,576.85
CenturyLink City - phone /
internet ......................................32.50
CenturyLink - LIB .........................66.64
City of Gilmore City ....................206.08
City of Gilmore City - LIB ..............5.00
Data Tech - software license and support
fee.........................................2,737.21
EMC Life Ins. - Life ins. for
employees ...............................109.92
Fastenal - shop supplies .................13.74
GC-B School .............................1,168.82
Groebner - gas line riser .................44.30
Hawkins - water treatment
chemicals ................................144.15
Humboldt Co Auditor - plat
book ..........................................24.00
Humboldt Independent - Council Min.
publishing................................265.07
Humboldt Reminder - various
advertising .................................84.00
Humboldt Springs - water during boil
order ..........................................99.00
I and S Group ...............................315.00
IAMU - EECBG reporting, time and
labor ........................................502.50
IMWCA - Workman’s Comp
premiums ................................951.00
KHBT radio - community calendar
ads .............................................20.00
Krudico - supplies to repair Nitrate
tank..........................................337.20
Martin Marietta Materials, rock for
fill ..............................................86.91
Chris McKee - reimbursement for door
jam ..............................................7.48
MET - lab testing for water/ww ...135.00
NMDG - legal dues for Tom
Gorak ......................................848.78
North Iowa Environmental - Brian
Klein’s services ....................1,458.00
Office Elements - copier/machine
rental .......................................144.72
PlanScape Partners - Assisting in CDBG
grant .....................................1,755.00
Pocahontas Co Auditor - plat
book ..........................................28.00
Pocahontas Record Dem -
advertising .................................57.36
Pro Coop - fuel and vehicle
repairs...................................1,093.54
RJ Computer Repair - computer
repair .......................................186.00
S and L Equip. - Fire Equip. .....3,493.94
Sande Construction - Water Dept.
Supplies ...................................356.33
Shopper’s Supply - Misc PWD
supplies .....................................23.46
U.S. Cellular - PWD/Amb cell
phones .....................................222.20
US Energy Services, Inc. - gas
services...............................48,453.65
VISA - travel exp, training, etc ....281.04
VISA - Library .............................491.30
West Bend Int - parts for New Holland
tractor ..........................................5.55
West Bend Journal - advertising ....31.00
Total Claims To Be Paid .... $75,993.55
Receipts
General ..................................$71,775.65
Road Use .................................. 3,893.47
Employee Benefits ....................9,319.53
Emergency ...................................722.60
Local Option Sales Tax .............3,509.97
TIF District #1 ...........................5,378.01
Debt Service ............................19,475.87
Water .......................................13,349.10
Sewer .........................................4,833.22
Gas ..........................................40,592.62
Total receipts......................$172,850.04
Disbursements
General ..................................$32,435.86
Road Use ...................................9,680.04
Employee Benefits ....................1,906.58
Local Option Sales Tax .............1,168.82
Water .........................................5,215.85
Sewer .........................................3,295.74
Gas ..........................................50,615.29
Total Disbursements .........$104,318.18
BUSINESS ITEMS: Building Permit
#526 for Jane Blanchard to build a 5’ x
8’ deck on the west side of 401 SE 4th
St. was approved. Hoover motioned, sec-
onded by Gafford.
Vote: Ayes- Gafford, Smith, Dickey,
Johnson. Nays- 0. Abstain- 0. Absent-0.
Motion carried.
Mediacom’s Franchise Contract re-
newal was tabled for further information.
Clerk to research.
Mr. Nicholas Knowles was hired as
the Public Works Assistant. He is to start
November 13, 2012, at a wage of $16 to
be increased after a 90 day probationary
period to $16.50. Johnson motioned, sec-
onded by Smith.
Vote: Ayes- Smith, Gafford, Dickey,
Hoover. Nays- 0. Abstain- 0. Absent-0.
Motion carried.
Resolution 2012-19 regarding the ap-
plication for CDBG grant funding was
approved. Dickey motioned, seconded
by Hoover.
Vote: Ayes- Hoover, Gafford, Smith,
Johnson. Nays- 0. Abstain- 0. Absent-0.
Motion carried.
PWD superintendent, Blaine Telford,
was given the okay to purchase a new air
compressor for use in the City Shop not
to exceed the amount of $2,500 but with
the appropriate cfm’s that are necessary
for the job. Hoover motioned, seconded
by Dickey.
Vote: Ayes- Dickey, Smith, Gafford,
Johnson. Nays- 0. Abstain- 0. Absent-0.
Motion carried.
DISCUSSION ITEMS: The mayor
wanted a discussion regarding a time
clock installed in the City Hall. Cost
versus the amount of employees was an
issue. Comments from the public were
also considered.
The mayor also wanted a discussion
on replacing the windows in the City
Hall. If not replacing, possibly have
blinds purchased for in between the win-
dows. Council discussed the need and
found there was none at this time. Cost
was also a factor.
COMMUNICATIONS: PWD: Blaine
Telford discussed a request for a gas line
to be moved. Council discussed the lack
of a building permit for this session of
Council Meeting. Also, this same person
was moving in a mobile home and was
not following the Gilmore City Code of
Ordinances. The issue was to be further
investigated before the gas line was to be
moved.
Council members requested that the
Clerk write an Ordinance a charge for
anyone requesting a special meeting for
a non-emergency situation, such as but
not limited to a building permit.
Library Director Lana Lewis had
nothing to report at this time.
Lavonne Hoover, Co-chair of the
Hometown Pride Project, discussed
progress of the meetings that had taken
place. Many ideas had been passed
around, but no projects have begun at
this time.
Fire Dept. accepted the new Fire Sta-
tion from the contractors after the 11
month inspection. Contractors have now
been paid in full. A discussion regard-
ing the purchase of a generator for the
building was held. Further information
is needed to proceed with said purchase.
Fire Dept. Chief Lowell Johnson an-
nounced that the Fireman’s Chili Supper
raised over $3,000. Thanks to all who
came and donated.
Tim Smith also shared that there was
to be a Grain Bin Rescue training and
County Fire Meeting coming up to be
held at the new Fire Station.
Ambulance Crew reported that there
will be a class held for anyone interested
in becoming an EMT in January 2013
that will last two-five hours a night, two
nights a week for a period of approxi-
mately five months. Ads to recruit new
members for the Gilmore City Ambu-
lance were going to be placed soon.
PUBLIC COMMENTS: Doris Land-
messer showed concerns about the tor-
nado sirens next door to her home, blow-
ing during fire calls. Humboldt County
Dispatch has been contacted about the
problem a number of times.
Dickey motioned, seconded by Gaf-
ford, to adjourn this session at 7:34 p.m.
and to schedule Monday, December 10
at 6:30 p.m., as the date and time for the
next regular meeting of the Gilmore City
Council.
Vote: Ayes- Gafford, Smith, Hoover,
Johnson. Nays- 0. Abstain- 0. Absent-0.
Motion carried.
Putter Jergens, Mayor
Attest:
Chris McKee, City Clerk
I-26-1
COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS
City of Livermore
Livermore, Iowa
Mayor Connor called the regular
Livermore City Council meeting to order
at 7 p.m., on November 5, 2012. Collins,
Crahan, Porter and Jensen were present,
Fredin absent.
Motion by Porter, seconded by Jen-
sen, to approve agenda and previously
published minutes. All voted aye.
Motion by Collins, seconded by
Crahan, to approve reports as given. All
ayes. Fire Department responded to two
fires in the past 2 months. New firemen
are being recruited and a tanker needs
work.
Public Comment: Request from resi-
dent by show of hands how many rooms
are in City Hall. Concensus was two.
Bill Goldy briefed the council of the
community housing needs assessment
for Alissa Reinholdt to fulfill CDBG
grant requirements. Motion by Porter,
seconded by Jensen, to approve Resolu-
tion # 11/05/12 -159, A Resolution Ap-
proving Submission of a 2013 CDBG
Water/Sewer Fund Application. Roll call
vote: Collins, Porter and Jensen voted
aye, Crahan voted nay.
Porter made a motion to approve the I
and S group engineer contract. Seconded
by Jensen. Porter and Jensen voted aye,
Collins and Crahan voted nay. Motion
did not pass.
Motion by Porter, seconded by Jen-
sen, to pay Engineer, I and S, the invoice
for the work they have already done, not
to exceed $11,000. Porter, Jensen aye;
Collins and Crahan nay.
Swimming Pool Chlorine bid tabled
until December meeting.
Concrete removal was discussed at
4th Avenue and 2nd Street. Additional
work will be put on budget list for next
year.
Museum – the council meeting will
convene at the museum on December 3,
2012, at 6:30 p.m., to see what is left in
the building and how to dispose of it. The
corner stone of the school is at the Hum-
boldt museum.
Motion by Collins, seconded by Cra-
han, to donate $25 to Santa Days. All
ayes.
Motion by Tom, seconded by Crahan,
to continue with the Christmas lighting
contest. First place receives a $50 credit
on their electric bill, second place re-
ceives $25 and third place is $15. Col-
lins, Crahan and Jensen aye, Porter nay.
No Old business. Motion by Crahan,
seconded by Jensen, to approve bills. All
ayes.
Motion by Jensen to go into closed
session at 8:30 to discuss the county
shed. Porter seconded. Came out of
closed session at 8:35. Meeting was ad-
journed at 8:35.
Bills
General wages ........................ $2,610.73
Library wages ........................... 1,255.21
Maintenance wages .................. 5,391.57
Capital One, books ........................ 28.84
100 Mini Storage, rental ............... 45.00
Ingram Lib, books ....................... 107.10
Arnold Motor, veh rpr ................. 123.44
P. Streit, supplies ........................... 13.00
CRA Pymt, cylinder rpr ................ 93.79
Century Link, phone ..................... 92.14
Hum Co Ext, trng .......................... 35.00
USPO, postage .............................. 80.00
Humboldt Indep, pubs ................... 98.97
IDALS, pesticide cert .................... 15.00
Hawkins, chlorine ....................... 272.50
Matt Parrott, off sup .................... 194.36
USA Bluebook, test sup .............. 236.03
NW Materials, sand ...................... 96.42
Brown Sup, curb box .................... 21.88
Century Link, phone ................... 150.52
Aramark Uni., rug cleaning ........ 178.36
Hum Co. REC, utilities .......... 22,228.55
Central IA Dist, towels, bags ...... 182.10
Kriz-Davis, wire mould............... 280.50
Certified Fire, check extinguisher 246.00
Harry’s, elec. water heater............. 30.00
May Equip., stump removal ........ 400.00
City of Livermore, util ............. 1,548.70
Data Tech, license fee .............. 2,207.92
Stuart Irby, lights ...................... 1,848.68
US Bank, gas tank ....................... 601.75
O’Halloran, gas tank ................... 418.81
Mangold, w/w testing .................. 218.00
Menards, shop supplies ............... 344.33
S and L Equip, FD truck repair 1,299.47
NCIRSWA, landfill ..................... 144.00
W and H, fuel ............................. 741.37
IA Firemen Assoc., dues ............. 176.00
Martin Marietta, rock .................. 460.75
Team Lab, chloride ..................... 759.00
Treas. St. of IA, sales tax ............ 727.00
Gold Eagle, seed ......................... 139.68
NW Bank, fed/FICA taxes ..... 2,664.66
USPO, postage ............................ 109.00
IPERS, retirement .................... 1,856.07
S. Caldwell, util. dep. ref .............. 73.49
Truenorth, insurance ................ 3,225.78
B. Hansen, util. dep. ref .............. 175.00
Treas. St. of IA, withholding ....... 445.00
K. Laffoon, util. dep. ref ............. 150.00
IA Workforce ................................ 64.29
M. McDermott, util. dep. ref ....... 175.00
Receipts: General-$33,454; Emp
Ben-$2,983.56; Road Use-$2,312.99;
Water-$4,465.52; Sewer-$3,937.32;
Electric-$29,232.36; Garbage-$2,630.60
Robert Connor, Mayor
Jean Larson, City Clerk
I-26-1
dersigned, and creditors having claims
against the estate shall file them with the
clerk of the above named district court,
as provided by law, duly authenticated,
for allowance, and unless so filed by the
later to occur of four months from the
second publication of this notice or one
month from the date of mailing of this
notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid)
a claim is thereafter forever barred.
Dated this 7th day of November,
2012.
James F. Clowes,
Co-Executor
R.R., Box 1773,
Hermitage, MO 65668
Robert B. Clowes,
Co-Executor
5523 55th Street N.W.,
Rochester, MN 55901
Anne C. Conover,
Co-Executor
4356 Morelia Court,
Fair Oaks, CA 95628
Gregory H. Stoebe,
ICIS PIN No: AT0007531
Attorney for Executors,
Stoebe Law Office
P.O. Box 604
Humboldt, IA 50548
Date of second publication: 22nd day
of November, 2012.
I-26-2
Don't miss a single issue.
Call us before you move.
The Humboldt Independent Newspaper
515-332-2514
8B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
NOTICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATIONAL MEETING
DOCKET NUMBER E-22104
Humboldt County, Iowa
MidAmerican Energy Company (MidAmerican or Company), a public utility with its principal place of business at 666 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 50309, is proposing to construct a 345,000 volt
(345 kV) electric transmission line in Iowa from a proposed substation near 300th and Starling Avenue in O’Brien County easterly and southerly across public and private property in O’Brien County, Clay
County, Palo Alto County, Kossuth County, Humboldt County and Webster County to an existing MidAmerican substation located in Webster County.
The proposed electric transmission line corridor Humboldt County is generally depicted on the enclosed map and will use an existing 161kV line corridor as much as practical by rebuilding this into a
double circuit electric transmission line on single pole structures. This new 345 kV line will assist in providing for additional electric transmission capacity to enable new renewable generation develop-
ment, relieve congestion on the existing electric transmission system and increase electric transmission system reliability in Iowa. MidAmerican will seek easement rights from landowners for the pro-
posed line to be constructed across private property. The new easement width requested will generally be 150 feet.
In accordance with the Iowa Code, an Informational Meeting concerning this project will be held at the following time and location:
9:00 AM – December 6, 2012
Humboldt County Fairgrounds
311 6th Avenue North - Humboldt, IA 50548
As a landowner or a party in possession of, or residing on property, affected by the location and construction of said electric transmission line, you have the right to be present at the Informational
Meeting mentioned above.
You also have the right to file with the Iowa Utilities Board, 1375 E. Court Street, Room 69, Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0069, objections to the location and construction of the proposed line as described.
A representative of the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) will preside over this Informational Meeting and will distribute and review a statement of the legal rights of landowners as required by law. Qualified
representatives of MidAmerican will also be at the meeting to discuss the project and answer your questions.
Persons with disabilities requiring assistive services or devices to observe or participate should contact the IUB at (515) 725-7300 in advance of the scheduled date to request that appropriate arrange-
ments be made.
Following the meeting, right-of-way personnel from the Company will begin contacting landowners to purchase voluntary easements. Later, the Company will file a petition for a franchise by county
with the IUB for permission to build the electric line and, if necessary, will request the right of eminent domain (condemnation) on property where voluntary easements have not been obtained. The IUB
decides whether to approve or deny the franchise through a hearing process. The IUB's decision is based on the record created at that hearing.
The duty of the IUB is to determine if the proposed electric line promotes the public convenience and necessity and meets the other requirements of Iowa law and IUB rules that apply. The IUB may
appoint an administrative law judge to preside over the hearing and issue a proposed decision. The administrative law judge's decision will become the final decision of the IUB unless appealed to the
IUB by a party to the case within the time limit provided for in the proposed decision. When the IUB has decided the case, either initially or on appeal from the administrative law judge's proposed deci-
sion, the IUB’s ruling may be appealed in the courts.
The IUB, in considering a petition for the right of condemnation, does so in an open and public process. If the IUB grants the right of condemnation, the Company will petition the chief judge of the
judicial district for the county involved to appoint a compensation commission. The compensation commission sets the compensation amount. The Company posts the amount of the award with the
Sheriff to be claimed by the landowner. The Company may then proceed with the work. The landowner or the Company may appeal the amount determined by the compensation commission to the
courts.
When this project is completed, the Company will meet with landowners to settle construction damages.
If in the event of inclement weather, determined by the cancellation or early dismissal of school/classes in the Humboldt School District due to weather on the date of this Information Meeting, the
meeting will be held on December 13, 2012 at 9:00 AM at this same location.
If you can not attend the meeting previously mentioned, additional meetings will be held at the following:
December 4, 2012 – 9:00 AM Hartley Community Center
820 2nd St. NE
Hartley, IA 51346
December 4, 2012 – 2:00 PM Clay County Regional Events Center
800 W. 18th Street
Spencer, IA 51301
December 5, 2012 – 2:00 PM Algona Public Library
210 N. Phillips Street
Algona, IA 50511
December 5, 2012 – 9:00 AM Iowa Lakes Community College
Auditorium 282
Entrances 3 and 4
3200 College Drive
Emmetsburg, IA 50536
December 6, 2012 – 2:00 PM Best Western Starlite Village Hotel
1518 3rd Avenue NW
Fort Dodge, IA 50501
For more information, please contact MidAmerican Energy Company at 866-950-9588.
TWIN RIVERS COMMUNITY
SCHOOL
School Board Proceedings
Bode, Iowa
The Board of Education of the Twin
Rivers Community School District met
on Thursday, November 8, 2012, at 5:30
p.m., at Bode Board Room for their regu-
lar board meeting.
Board members present were Byron
How, Tom Olson, Judy Fredin, Christine
Bothne and Sharon Berte. Also present
was Superintendent Greg Darling, Prin-
cipal Don Hasenkamp, and Secretary
Rhiannon Lange.
Fredin moved and Bothne seconded, to
approve the agenda with the addition of
item XIII. Consent Agenda and Payment
of bills. Motion carried.
Bills
General Fund
Ames Environmental, Inc...........$200.00
CDW Government, Inc. ............2,528.98
Counsel Office and Document .....140.30
Follett Library Resources .............307.85
Humboldt Independent ...................84.35
Iowa Div. of Labor Services ...........50.00
Menards ........................................271.65
MidAmerican Energy ...................754.85
Pasquales Pizza ..............................37.12
Plumb Supply ...............................171.62
Prairie Lakes AEA .........................43.50
School Specialty ...........................149.05
Shoppers Supply Co. ........................1.89
Target Bank ..................................293.31
W and H Coop Oil Co. ..............1,348.45
Management Fund
Iowa Workforce Development $1,005.00
Worthington Insurance and R.E. ..578.00
PPEL Fund
Humboldt Co. Engineer ..........$2,439.24
Midwest Fence and Gate Co. ....4,415.86
Twin Rivers Comm. School .........686.00
Wempen’s Garden Center .........4,320.25
Nutrition Fund
Dean Foods ................................$180.22
Earthgrains Baking Co ...................41.90
Hy-Vee, Inc. ...................................32.94
General Fund
ABC Pest Control ........................$40.00
CDW Government, Inc. ...............314.45
Central Iowa Dist., Inc. ..................16.84
Feld Fire .......................................514.80
Humboldt Reminder .......................24.50
John’s Repair ................................136.16
New Cooperative, Inc. ....................91.00
Norm’s General Store ....................35.68
CenturyLink .................................275.27
Rieman Music ................................24.60
Sande Construction ......................111.31
Scholastic Book Fairs-30 .............255.12
Twin Rivers Petty Cash ................195.00
Legals
W and H Coop Oil Co. ..............3,494.30
Nutrition Fund
Dean Foods ..................................$89.01
Hy-Vee, Inc. ...................................60.71
Keck, Inc. .....................................771.22
Martin Bros Dist Inc. ................1,228.52
No one spoke in Open Forum.
Tricia Gargano, Preschool Teacher,
presented information on the Gold Pro-
gram that she uses for the 3 and 4 year
olds.
Principal Hasenkamp informed the
board of the students receiving a bowl-
ing trip for reaching their reading goals,
discussed the 60” television that is now
in the cafeteria/gymnasium that will be
used for various educational activities for
students, Iowa Assessments are currently
in process, Parent-Teacher Conferences
went well, the 4th/5th graders helped
with the landscaping project on October
24th, the fencing near the playground is
now installed and Dare graduation will
be December 6, 2012 for the 5th graders.
Superintendent Darling informed
the board of AEA flow through money
which pays for professional development
and special education and also discussed
certain services that the district main-
tains each year.
How moved, Fredin seconded, to ap-
prove policies for first read:
• 800 Objectives of Buildings and Sites
• 801.1 Buildings and Sites Long
Range Planning
• 801.2 Buildings and Sites Surveys
• 801.3 Educational Specifications For
Buildings and Sites
• 801.4 Site Acquisition
• 801.5 Bids and Awards For Construc-
tion Contracts
• 802.1 Maintenance Schedule
• 802.2 Requests For Improvements
• 802.3 Emergency Repairs
• 802.4 Capital Assets
• 802.4R1 Capital Assets Regulation
• 802.4R2 Capital Assets Management
System Definitions
• 802.5 Building and Sites Adaptation
For Persons With Disabilities
• 802.6 Vandalism
• 802.7 Energy Conservation
• 605.7R1 Use of Information Resourc-
es Regulation
Motion carried.
Berte moved, Bothne seconded, to ap-
prove policies for second read:
• 711.2 Student Conduct on School
Transportation
• 711.2R1 Student Conduct on School
Transportation Regulation
• 711.2R2 Use of Video Cameras on
School Buses Regulation
• 711.3 Student Transportation for
Extra-Curricular Activities
• 711.5 Transportation of NonResident
and NonPublic School Students
• 711.6 Transportation of NonSchool
Groups
• 711.7 School Bus Safety Instruction
• 711.8 Transportation in Inclement
Weather
• 711.8R1 Transportation in Inclement
Weather Regulation
Motion carried.
Bothne moved, How seconded, to ap-
prove policies for third and final read:
• 503.3R1 Student Fee Waiver and Re-
duction Procedures
• 707.1 Business Manager’s Reports
• 707.2 Treasurer’s Annual Report
• 707.3 Publication of Financial Re-
ports
• 707.4 Audit
• 707.5 Internal Controls
• 708 Care, Maintenance and Disposal
of School District Records
• 709 Insurance Program
• 710.1 School Food Program
• 710.2 Fee or Reduced Cost Meals Eli-
gibility
• 710.3 Vending Machines
• 711.1 Student School Transportation
Eligibility
Motion carried.
Berte moved, How seconded, to ap-
prove the resignation of Fred Johnson as
Half Time Technology Director effective
December 21, 2012. Motion carried.
Bothne moved, Fredin seconded, to ap-
prove the Twin Rivers CSD Board Goals
for 2012-2013. Motion carried.
Berte moved, How seconded, to ap-
prove the Drug and Alcohol Testing Pro-
gram for 2012-2013. Motion carried.
Bothne moved, Berte seconded, to ap-
prove a 5 percent ELL contract upon ap-
proval with the Humboldt CSD. Motion
carried.
How moved, Berte seconded, to ap-
prove the SBRC application for Increas-
ing Enrollment, Open Enrollment Out,
and excess LEP costs. Motion carried.
Bothne moved, Fredin seconded, to ap-
prove the Consent Agenda including the
financial reports, the bills for payment,
and the Minutes of the October 11, 2012
Regular Board Meeting. Motion carried.
How moved, Berte seconded, the meet-
ing be adjourned. The meeting adjourned
at 6:43 p.m.
Tom Olson, President
Rhiannon Lange, Secretary
I-26-1
NOTICE
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
MAINTENANCE SHOP
FOR SALE BY SEALED BIDS
Thor Shop: Location: 106 Williksen
Street, Thor, Iowa, Legal: Lots 19,20,
21, 22, and 23, all in block one (1) Wil-
liksen addition to the town of Thor. De-
scription: 40’x25’ masonry building, city
sewer, natural gas heat.
Ottosen Shop: Location: 401 Bryan
Avenue, Ottosen, Iowa. Legal: Lots 3, 4,
and 5 in block #13 of the original town of
Ottosen. Description: 40’x24’ masonry
building with forced air furnace and pro-
pane tank included. Private sewer.
Livermore Shop: Location: 702 1st
Street, Livermore, Iowa. Legal: Lots 9
and 10 in Block 6, McCauley’s Second
Addition in the town of Livermore. De-
scription: 40’x24’ masonry building with
fuel oil forced air furnace and oil tank
included. City sewer.
Hardy Shop: Location: 103 NW
2nd Street, Hardy, Iowa. Legal: Lots 6,
7, and 8, in Block 7, Original Plat, Town
of Hardy. Description: 36’x40’ shop and
20’x26’ office masonry building with
32’x40’ attached pole building. Shop
and office fuel oil furnace and oil tank
included. Private sewer.
Bode Shop: Location: 401 Legion
Street, Bode, Iowa. Legal: (abbreviated)
A parcel of land in the SE 1/4 of the NE
1/4 of section 17, T93N, R29 W contain-
ing 1.36 acres and subject to easements
of record. Description: 38’x40’ fuel oil
heated masonry building, 53’x40’ pro-
pane heated pole shed and 58’x40’ pole
building. Heating fuel oil tank and pro-
pane tank included. Private sewer. Dirt
pile is not included in sale. Pile to be
removed by Humboldt County prior to
January 1, 2015.
Bradgate Shop: Location: 107 East
Fox Street, Bradgate, Iowa. Legal: East
28’ of the south 20’ of lot Eleven and the
East 28’ of lot Twelve, all in block 8 in
the town of Bradgate, Iowa. Description:
28’x45’ bare lot, more or less.
METHOD AND TERMS OF SALE:
1. A public hearing is set for 10 a.m.,
on November 19, 2012, where writ-
ten sealed bids shall be delivered to the
Humboldt County Auditor at the Hum-
boldt County Courthouse, 203 Main
Street, Dakota City, Iowa, by 10 a.m.,
November 19, 2012.
2. The Highest Bid for each location
will be considered.
3. Possession is expected at date of
closing on or before January 1, 2013.
COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS
City of LuVerne
LuVerne, Iowa
The LuVerne City Council met on
Wednesday, November 5, 2012, at 7
p.m., at the LuVerne Public Library.
Mayor Holmes called the meeting to
order. Council present were Kevin Mc-
Peak, Gene Frideres, Matt Lawson, C.P.
Patterson, and Jim Carroll. Also present
were Randy VanDyke, Dale Johnson,
and city employee Marilyn Johnson.
The public hearing regarding the sale
of certain city owned property within Lu-
Verne, W 1/2 LOT 2 BLK 3 ZOELLES
ADD, was opened at 7 p.m. One bid was
received. Motion by McPeak, seconded
by Lawson, to reject the bid. All ayes.
Motion carried. Hearing closed.
Minutes of the previous meeting
were approved as read. Motion by Fri-
deres, seconded by McPeak, to approve
all bills as listed. All ayes. Motion car-
ried. Listed bills: MidAmerican Energy
$998.57, Kossuth Auditor $383.50, NIA-
COG $11,010, ILRW $25,932, Post-
master $10.30, Halloween prizes $30,
Hy-Vee $124.79, S. Hunt $169.87, Acco
$311.25, Ag Source Labs $132.32, Ar-
nold Motor Supply $13.99, Bomgaars
$45.66, Capesuis J Farms $150, Carroll
Implement $555.27, Carroll Implement
$500, Century Link $125.09, Flipside
$3, Humboldt Independent $182.80,
IA Municipal Insurance $4,720, IA
One Call $31.50, M. Johnson $59.66,
M. Johnson $40.39, Kirkwood College
$860, Kmart $14.99, Kossuth Regional
Health $25, Shoppers Supply $94.02,
Terry’s Welding $3,068.48, W and H
Coop $1,591.20, Payroll $3,975.76.
Claims by fund: General $15,913.22,
Water $2,304.19, CDBG $36,942, Total
Claims $55,159.41. October receipts by
fund: General $27,157.30, Road Use
$1,509.60, Trust and Agency $3,445.62,
Water $8,524.12, CDBG $36,942, Total
Receipts $77,578.64.
The treasurer’s report and financial
report were accepted as given.
Council discussed more ways of se-
curing the city dump area.
Council discussed the need for a hy-
drant pressure meter. Lawson will look
into prices before the next meeting.
Council reviewed overdue water bills.
Shut off notices will be sent.
The Mayor read a letter from a citizen
regarding a dog bite.
The Community Chest has donated
$755 to the fire department and $535 to
the first responders.
Motion by Carroll, seconded by Law-
son, to donate $50 to Compass Pointe.
All ayes. Motion carried.
Randy VanDyke, ILRW, updated the
council on the wastewater project. The
synthetic liner is here. Weather and tem-
perature conditions may delay the instal-
lation of the liner. VanDyke will be at the
December meeting one half hour early
to go over the pay requests to date. Mo-
tion by Frideres, seconded by McPeak,
to sign the meter reading agreement be-
tween the City of LuVerne and ILRW.
All ayes. Motion carried. The Mayor
has signed the second drawdown request
from the CDBG grant for $25,198 pay-
able to ILRW. The Mayor has signed the
third drawdown request from the CDBG
grant for $39,804 payable to ILRW.
Motion by Frideres, seconded by
McPeak, to approve the liquor license
renewal application from Flipside Pizza
and Pub. All ayes. Motion carried.
Council discussed lobby hours for the
post office. Council was not in favor of
leaving the City Hall open 24/7 for the
post office.
The public works position was dis-
cussed. Hunt has been on the job for
over 90 days, so now qualifies for health
insurance benefits. Council discussed
purchasing a different city vehicle for
the public works department. Carroll
presented information on a used Ford
truck and prices for a new truck.
The City will renew their member-
ship in NW Iowa League of Cities.
Meeting adjourned at 9 p.m.
Marilyn Johnson, City Clerk
I-26-1
4. All properties and improvements
sold as is.
5. Humboldt County reserves the
right to accept or reject any or all bids.
6. Private sewage systems are sold as
is. Buyer shall be responsible for provid-
ing appropriate certified inspection, new
system installation or closure and dis-
connection.
7. Sites are available by appointment.
Contact Humboldt County Engineer at
515-332-2366.
I-26-1
Thursday, November 15, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 9B
CARRIER ROUTE PRSRT STD US POSTAGE
PAID HUMBOLDT, IA 50548 PERMIT NO. 29
YOUR NUMBER ONE ADVERTISING SOURCE SINCE 1931
POSTAL CUSTOMER
Volume 79 - 46 Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Phone: 515.332.3425 James Gargano, Publisher
Ph. 332-1498 • Open 6 am-11 pm 7 days a week (Pharmacy 332-5082) • Hrs: M-F 8:30 am-7:30 PM; Sat. 9 am-5 pm; Sun. 10 am-5 pm
Prices Good Oct. 31-Nov. 6
For your convenience, we accept Bank Cards...Mastercard, Visa and Discover, and Humboldt Chamber Bucks • We reserve the right to limit quantities.
SIGN UP TODAY! SEE STORE FOR DETAILS!
FAMILY FEAST
TURKEY DINNER $
109.95
Serves up to 12, only $9.16 per person.
Choose six family-size side dishes or pies.
Family-size side dishes serve 8 to 12.
BONELESS TURKEY
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Serves up to 4, only $11.24 per person.
Choose three dinner-sized side dishes or 1/2 pie.
Dinner-size side dishes serve 3 to 4.
STEAMSHIP ROUND
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$
109.95
Serves up to 12, only $9.16 per person.
Choose six family-size side dishes or pies.
Family-size side dishes serve 8 to 12.
TRADITIONAL BONELESS
HAM DINNER
$
69.95
Serves up to 8, only $8.74 per person.
Choose three family-size side dishes or pies.
Family-size side dishes serve 8 to 12.
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heat &serve
HUMBOLDT
Have A Safe
& Happy
Halloween!
From all of us at the HUMBOLDT REMINDER
2011
Humboldt County, Iowa
Thursday, November 1, 2012
$1.25
Area churches ....................6B
Classifi ed
advertising .................. 10A
Community calendar ........6B
Courthouse news .............. 4A
Obituaries ............................ 9A
Sports ...................................1B
2 Sections
Offi cial newspaper of Humboldt County
Vol. 154 No. 24 USPS No. 254060
HHS to present South Pacifi c
Humboldt High School Drama and Music departments will present “South Pacifi c” Nov. 1, 2 and 3 in the R.W. Carlson
auditorium. Among the students involved in one of the scenes above, from left: Jacob Helvick, Katie Currier, Holly Kirch-
hoff and Jenifer Bentz. Tickets for the show are $6 adults and $3 students, available in the high school offi ce. The curtain
will rise at 7:30 each evening. See the special section on the musical inside this issue. Humboldt Independent photo. To
view or purchase additional photos, visit the Independent online at www.humboldtnews.com.
Humboldt Community School District Superintendent Greg Darling (right) presented
the Iowa High School Athletic Association State playoff participation trophy to senior class
football players after Humboldt’s 21-12 loss to South Tama Monday night in the second
round of the playoffs at Mason Maach Field in Humboldt. Humboldt Independent photo.
HHS m
usical sets sail this w
eek
The Humboldt High
School Drama and Music
Departments proudly pres-
ent the Rodgers and Ham-
merstein Broadway musical
“South Pacifi c” this Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 1, 2, and 3, in the R.
W. Carlson auditorium.
“South Pacifi c” is a Rodgers
and Hammerstein classic,
which won a Pulitzer Prize
for Best Drama, as well as
10 Tonys when it debuted in
1949. Despite the passage of
60-plus years, it retains its
signifi cance today, address-
ing themes of race, bigotry
and identity. Along with the
serious themes, many light-
hearted moments fi ll the
stage.
The Humboldt cast is led
by Jen Bentz as the hopeless-
ly romantic Nellie Forbush,
and Jake Helvick as French
planter Emile De Beque
singing the Richard Rodgers
classics “I’m Gonna Wash
That Man Right Outta My
Hair,” and “Some Enchanted
Evening.” James Sobkoweak
plays Lt. Joe Cable who falls
in love with islander, Liat
(Andra Niles), and delivers
the central message of the
show in “You’ve Got To Be
Carefully Taught.” Miranda
Pederson adds comic relief
with the character Bloody
Mary who tries to sell sou-
venirs to the sailors as well
as pair her daughter with
“saxy” Lt. Cable.
Most fun of all is watch-
ing the ensemble of sail-
ors and nurses, led by Sam
George as Luther Billis,
head of the base’s laundry
operation. Sam leads the
talented sailors in a rousing
version of “There Is Nothin’
Like A Dame,” and wiggles
around in a grass skirt and
coconut bra during “Honey
Bun.” The nurses are very
busy keeping track of Nel-
ly’s emotions in “I’m Gonna
Wash,” and “I’m In Love
With A Wonderful Guy.”
They also put on an unfor-
gettable “Thanksgiving Fol-
lies” show for the sailors of
the base.
Tickets for the show are
$6 adults and $3 students,
and are available in the high
school offi ce. The curtain
will rise at 7:30 each eve-
ning. Don’t miss this grand
musical performance.
Supervisors
approve funds
for Ottosen
By Kent Thompson
Worried about setting
a precedent, the Humboldt
County Board of Supervisors
begrudgingly approved a pay-
ment of $1,000 to the city of
Ottosen for street repair on
Monday.
The payment are funds the
city contends is owed them,
because it believes the work
should have been done by the
county in the fi rst place.
Ottosen Mayor Richard
Kinseth and Council member
Jason Fowler were at Mon-
day’s meeting, and explained
an issue with the intersection
with County Road C-20, the
main east/west thoroughfare
through town, and 2nd Street.
The city said there was 10
feet of the approach from 2nd
Street to C-20 that was not fi n-
ished, leaving a large drop off.
According to county re-
cords, C-20 was resurfaced
through Ottosen in 2004. The
work included milling off four
inches of surface, replacing
with a four-inch cold and place
and three-inch asphalt overlay.
Kinseth said County Engi-
neer Paul Jacobson told them
that the approach was not
fi nished because 2nd Street
was not up to grade. Kinseth
explained that the town coun-
cil had received several com-
plaints from citizens about
the road and contracted with
Blacktop Service Company of
Humboldt to make the street
repairs and lay 10 feet of as-
phalt to connect C-20 and 2nd
Street. In a letter to the super-
visors, the council asked for
$1,200 to pay for the repairs
for road work that was com-
pleted that it believed should
have been the county’s respon-
sibility.
“Even in towns under 500
population, we (the county)
run the paving through the
town corporate limits with a
20-22-feet overlay with a fi ve
foot fi ll on the side streets
and alleys,” Jacobson told the
board.
Jacobson said the issue is
not unique to Ottosen, as there
are a number of city streets in
smaller towns that are not up
to grade. “Look at K Road in
Livermore. Thor also had an
See Supervisors,
Planting a new
seed: H
um
boldt business expands
There’s a new building
rapidly going up on High-
way 3 East.
It’s TRI County Agron-
omy, a Pioneer seed dealer-
ship owned by Joe Olson
and Dan Thompson. They
are constructing a 180’ by
60’ building, along with a
42’ by 36’ offi ce area on the
south side of Highway 3 just
between John Deere and
John’s Ag Service.
The new building will
allow them to hold all their
seed and crop protection
products before spring. With
18’ high sidewalls, they’ll
be able to stack the Pioneer
Pro Boxes three high in the
warehouse.
“It was an opportunity
to increase our capacity and
take delivery of all our ship-
ments whenever they are
ready. Ultimately it makes
us a more reliable supplier
for our customers,” Olson
said.
With the purchase of the
lot, dirt work started in Au-
gust. They hope to fully be
in the new building by mid-
November and are planning
an Open House in Decem-
ber.
Both Olson and Thomp-
son agree this is an excit-
ing opportunity for them to
increase their services and
Pioneer footprint in the area.
Plans call for the instal-
lation of fi ve bulk soybean
Dan Thompson (left) and Joe Olson stand in front of the new location of TRI County Agronomy, located on High-
way 3 East, next door to John’s Ag Service/John’s NAPA and John Deere. Construction is going at a rapid pace
and they hope to be operating out of the new location by the middle of November. Submitted photo.
Lighted parade
entries wanted
The 2012 Lighted Christ-
mas Parade is fast approach-
ing. Entries are now being ac-
cepted.
The Humboldt Lighted
Christmas Parade will be on
Saturday, Nov. 17, at 5 p.m.
The parade route will begin
by Northwest Bank, continu-
ing through Sumner Avenue
into Dakota City, Main Street.
It will end at the VFW in Da-
kota City. A free will chili sup-
per with Santa will conclude
the evening.
Registration deadline is
Wednesday, Nov. 14. For
entries, e-mail chamber@
hdcchamber.com or call
515-332-5447. Please provide
phone number and e-mail ad-
dress with registration.
Burn days Nov. 3
and 17 in Humboldt
The city of Humboldt will
allow open burning of yard
waste on Saturday, Nov. 3 and
17, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. No
burning is allowed on the city
right of way. All fi res must be
attended.
Remember
to vote
The 2012 general elec-
tion will be Tuesday, Nov.
6, with voting from 7 a.m.
to 9 p.m. at selected loca-
tions around the county.
Look inside today’s issue
for a more detailed report
on seats up for election
and polling locations in the
county.
A reminder that The
Humboldt County Audi-
tor’s Offi ce will be open
this Saturday, Nov. 3, from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the pur-
poses of early absentee vot-
ing. Absentee voting will
be allowed at the Auditor’s
Offi ce on Monday, Nov. 5,
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The last day to request
an absentee ballot is Friday,
Nov. 2, at 5 p.m. All mailed
ballots must be postmarked
by Monday, Nov. 5. Ab-
sentee ballots may be hand
delivered to the Auditor’s
Offi ce until the close of
voting, 9 p.m. on Tuesday,
Nov. 6.
People with questions
about voting may contact
the Humboldt County Au-
ditor’s Offi ce at 332-1571.
Art Preview
Local artists of all ages
have been exploring the
textures in a variety of art
forms including multimedia,
sculpture, painting, as well
as textiles. The HAAC board
is excited to open this year’s
art preview of the “Feel of
Art” with an artist reception
tonight (Thursday) from 5-8
p.m., in the Humboldt Art
Center at 906 Sumner Ave
in Humboldt.
Please join in celebrat-
ing the artists’ talents, visit
See Art Preview,
Humboldt County REC
earns million hour award
By Kent Thompson
In 1980, Ronald Reagan was energizing the electorate, Ab-
scam was uncovering public bribery, Pac-Man was gobbling
dots and ghosts and former Beatle John Lennon was assassi-
nated.
It was also the year that Humboldt County REC began a
streak that few organizations can equal, that is still going strong,
more than 32 years since it began.
On April 10, 1980, Humboldt County REC began day one of
not having a lost time accident.
Now, over one million employee work hours later, the elec-
tric cooperative celebrated with a recognition dinner Oct. 23,
honoring present and past employees for their accomplish-
ments.
The streak has enduring during the tenure of three general
managers, several board presidents and numerous employee
safety directors.
Henry Lenning was the general manager in 1980, succeeded
by Dennis Fuller in 1984, and Steve Long in 2000. Long’s ten-
ure will be coming to a close at the end of this year, as Hum-
boldt County Rural Electric Cooperative will cease operations
after 76 years, merging with Midland Power Cooperative of Jef-
ferson.
Through it all, one constant has been an emphasis on safety,
REC present and past offi cials, said at the celebration.
Long said the cooperative has built a culture of safety over
the years.
“The key elements are supervision, education and training,
along with work rules and proper equipment,” the general man-
ager said.
“A lot of what we do today was started back in 1980. We’re
still concerned about reliability, quality of service, commitment
to the members and commitment to safety.
“This cooperative has always had the attitude that safety is
everyone’s business and everyone has taken on that responsibil-
ity,” Long said.
Safety milestone is rare accomplishment
See REC Award,
See TRI County,
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Volum
e 3 • • Issue 11 • • Novem
ber 2012
See the ALL NEW
humboldtnews website
at www.humboldtnews.com
where you can:
• Subscribe to the print or e-edition
of the Humboldt Independent (print
subscribers automatically qualify
for the e-edition)
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• See all of the photos taken by
the talented staff
• See the latest in breaking
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County area
• See special issues
To fi nd out more visit
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10B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 15, 2012
The conclusion of the Veteran’s Day program was held near the VFW Memorial
on Sunday. The ceremony was moved from the south lawn of the Humboldt County
Courthouse to the VFW due to inclement weather. Humboldt Independent photo.
The Algona Area Children’s Chorus will present their first concert of the season
Sunday, Nov. 18, at 3 p.m., at the First United Methodist Church, 201 East Nebraska
St., Algona. The chorus is comprised of singers in grades fourth-sixth from com-
munities in Kossuth, Palo Alto and Humboldt counties. The chorus practices weekly
under the direction of Linda D. Mertz with accompaniment by Kristy Burdick. Sun-
day’s concert will feature classical, folk and holiday music. There is no admission
charge but free will donations are accepted. Pictured are some of the alumni of the
Algona Area Children’s Chorus. Submitted photo.
The holiday season will
soon be upon us. Humboldt
County Upper Des Moines
Opportunity, Inc. (UDMO) is
seeking volunteers (individu-
als and organizations) to assist
with the Salvation Army Ket-
tle Bell Ringing Campaign.
UDMO administers the Salva-
tion Army funds in Humboldt
County. The project starts the
day before Thanksgiving and
continues through Dec. 22
(providing there are volunteers
to ring the bells). The is no bell
ringing on Sundays.
Fareway, Hy-Vee, Dollar
General and Shop-Ko in Hum-
boldt have graciously donated
space for the Salvation Army
Bell ringing.
The more hours that the
kettles are staffed by volun-
teers, results in more funds for
Humboldt County Salvation
Army Crisis Fund. If individu-
als or organizations would like
to schedule a date and time to
ring bells at any of the loca-
tions or dates, please contact
UDMO at (515) 332-3631 or
Pat Hill, (515) 332-1544. If
you are unable to ring bells
and wish to make a donation,
make the checks out to Upper
Des Moines Opportunity, with
a note for the Salvation Army.
The need for help is going to
be huge this year. Upper Des
Moines Opportunity would
like to thank you in advance
for your support. Ninety per-
cent of the money raised in
Humboldt County, will stay
in Humboldt County. The
other 10 percent of the money
goes to the Regional Salvation
Army Office located in Oma-
ha, NE.
Humboldt Community
Schools
Week of Nov. 19-23
Monday, Nov. 19
Breakfast: Egg and cheese
biscuit, cereal, juice, milk.
Lunch: Mandarin orange
chicken (9-12), chicken sticks
(K-8), rice pilaf, broccoli,
cherry tomatoes, mandarin or-
anges, milk.
Tuesday, Nov. 20
Breakfast: Cereal, Trix yo-
gurt, juice, milk.
Lunch: Sloppy Joe, whole
grain bun, French fries, green
beans, peaches, milk.
Wednesday, Nov. 21
Breakfast: Breakfast pizza,
cereal, juice, milk.
Lunch: Hot dog, whole
grain bun, seasoned twisters,
baked beans, baby carrots,
applesauce, peanut butter bar,
milk.
Thursday, Nov. 22
Thanksgiving day, no
school.
Friday, Nov. 23:
No school.
Hot lunch
Bell ringers
needed
Fruit and vegetable
growers meeting
Are you a fruit or vegeta-
ble grower in Iowa? Would
you like to share your goals
and challenges, or voice your
thoughts on how horticultural
programming at Practical
Farmers of Iowa can best serve
your needs? If so, consider
participating in a horticulture
planning meeting hosted by
Practical Farmers of Iowa on
Monday, Nov. 26, from 8:45
a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Drake
Community Library in Grin-
nell, 930 Park St. Attendance
is free, includes lunch, and all
fruit and vegetable growers are
welcome.
After the meeting portion
has ended, PFI members An-
drew and Melissa Dunham,
owners of Grinnell Heritage
Farm, will discuss their sea-
son extension marketing, pro-
duction and storage practices
before leading attendees on a
tour of the season extension
structure on their farm, locat-
ed 1.8 miles northeast of the
library. Attendees are asked
to bring warm clothes for the
farm tour portion of the meet-
ing.
Attendees are asked to
RSVP by Wednesday, Nov. 21,
to PFI office assistant Lauren
Zastrow at lauren@practi-
calfarmers.org or call (515)
232-5661.
Shim at
www.shimkat.com
a
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f t h e F o r t D o d g e A u t o M
i l e
FIVE STAR
3126 5th Avenue South, Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501
515-573-7164 toll free 1-888-694-8745
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‘07 Chevy 1500 Tahoe LT 4WD Power drivers seat, 3rd seat, hitch, running boards, aluminum wheels, 68,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,995
‘07 Jeep Commander Sport 4WD Rear air & heat, power drivers seat, 3rd seat, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 115,000 miles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995
‘07 Ford Freestyle SEL FWD Rear air, sunroof, power drivers seat, auto headlamp, leather, aluminum wheels, 153,000 miles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995
‘06 Jeep Commander 4WD 7 passenger, rear air & heat, sunroof, power drivers seat, heated leather, CD changer, new tires, 11 7,000 miles . . . . . . $12,995
‘05 GMC Envoy XL SLT 4WDRear air & heat, sunroof, 3rd seat, heated leather, hitch, aluminum wheels, 116,000 miles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995
‘02 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4WDSunroof, power seats, trip computer, CD, heated leather, hitch, new tires, 136,000 miles. . . . . . . . . . $7,995
‘01 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4WDSunroof, heated leather, aluminum wheels, 173,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,495
‘99 Chevy Tahoe LT 4WD Rear air & heat, power seats, CD, leather, hitch, aluminum wheels, 174,500 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995
VANS
‘11 Chrysler Town & Country Touring Power seats, remote start, auto headlamps, leather, back up camera, aluminum wheels, 39,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . $22,995
‘08 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 7 passenger, rear air & heat, power windows & locks, 89,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,995
‘07 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Eldorado Drop-Floor Handicap Conversion Right side access ramp, 82,500 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,995
‘07 Chrysler Town & Country Limited Navigation, sunroof, power seats, trip computer, rear video, heated leather, chrome wheels, 99,500 m iles . . . $12,995
‘07 Chrysler Town & Country Touring Navigation, sunroof, power seats, trip computer, rear video, heated leather, new tires, aluminum wheels, 121,000 miles . . . $10,995
‘06 Toyota Sienna LE Navigation, rear air & heat, power drivers seat, rear video, aluminum wheels, 92,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . $11,995
‘05 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Stow n Go, rear air & heat, power drivers seat, trip computer, 156,500 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,295
‘05 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Power drivers seat, new tires, aluminum wheels, 114,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995
‘04 Pontiac Montana Power drivers seat, power sliding doors, rear video, backup assist, 152,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995
‘04 Ford Freestar SEL Rear air & heat, power seats, CD, leather, hitch, aluminum wheels, 128,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995
‘03 Chrysler Town & Country Quad seating, rear air & heat, CD, 85,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995
‘02 Chrysler Town & Country Limited Quad seating, power seats, trip computer, heated leather, chrome wheels, 104,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995
‘02 Chevy Venture LT Extended Rear air & heat, power drivers seat, CD, rear park assist, aluminum wheels, 108,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995
‘00 Chrysler Town & Country LX Rear air & heat, power drivers seat, trip computer, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 106,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,695
UNDER $4000
‘01 Ford Escort ZX22-dr coupe, aluminum wheels, AM/FM, 130,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,695
‘01 Ford Taurus SES4-dr, power windows & locks, power drivers seat, CD, aluminum wheels, 158,000 miles ........................................................................... $3,995
‘01 Dodge Stratus ESPower windows & locks, power drivers seat, CD, aluminum wheels, 150,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,695
‘99 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer 4WDPower drivers seat, 3rd seat, heated leather, CD changer, hitch, chrome wheels, 124,000 miles . . . $2,195
‘99 Dodge Durango SLT 4WDRear air, power drivers seat, trip computer, CD, leather, hitch, 148,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,995
‘99 Chevy 1500 Suburban LS 2WDRear air & heat, power drivers seat, 3rd seat, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 210,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,295
‘98 Ford Explorer XLT 4WDPower windows & locks, power drivers seat, CD, running boards, aluminum wheels, 179,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,995
‘97 Chevy 1500 Silverado Ext. Cab 2WDPower windows & locks, power seats, cruise, air, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 165,000 miles . . . . . . . . $3,995
‘96 Dodge Ram 1500 Laramie SLT Club Cab 2WDPower windows & locks, CD, hitch, side steps, aluminum wheels, 184,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,995
‘95 Ford F150 Eddie Bauer Super Cab Long Bed 4WD Power windows & locks, power drivers seat, aluminum wheels, 192,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,295
‘90 Buick LeSabre Custom4-dr, power windows & locks, cruise, air, 168,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,995
‘89 Chevy Corsica4-dr, cruise, power door locks, 104,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,695
CARS
‘11 Chevy Cruze 1LT RS 4-dr, power windows & locks, cruise, aluminum wheels, XM radio, 14,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995
‘11 Chrysler 200 Limited 4-dr, heated leather, 4 cyl., aluminum wheels, only 4,900 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,995
‘11 Chrysler 200 Touring Power drivers seat, auto temp. control auto headlamps, CD, aluminum wheels, 34,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,995
‘08 Chevy HHR LT Special Edition Power drivers seat, preminum speaker system, chrome wheels, rear spoiler, 43,000 miles . . $12,995
‘07 Dodge Caliber SXT 4-dr, power windows & locks, cruise, tailgate speakers, aluminum wheels, 45,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995
‘07 Pontiac Grand Prix Sport group, power drivers seat, auto headlamps, aluminum wheels, 72,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,995
‘07 Chrysler 300 Limited Power seats, auto headlamps, heated leather, chrome wheels, Sirius radio, 71,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995
‘07 Cadillac STS AWD 4-dr, Navigation, full power, sunroof, heated & ventilated leather, aluminum wheels, 48,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995
‘06 Dodge Charger SXT Power windows & locks, power drivers seat, aluminum wheels, 122,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,495
‘06 Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Power windows & locks, cruise, CD, 54,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995
‘06 Chrysler 300 Limited 4-dr, heated leather, chrome wheels, new tires, 72,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,995
‘06 Mercury Montego Premier AWD Sunroof, power seats, heated leather, new tires, 92,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,995
‘05 Chevy Monte Carlo LS Power windows & locks, power drivers seat, CD, aluminum wheels, 72,900 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,995
‘05 Mercury Grand Marquis LS Power seats, auto. headlamps, CD, leather, aluminum wheels, 92,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,995
‘04 Pontiac Grand Am GT 4-dr, power windows & locks, CD, aluminum wheels, rear spoiler, 103,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6,995
‘04 Dodge Intrepid4-dr, 2.7 V6, full power, aluminum wheels, 100,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995
‘02 Lexus LS 430 Sunroof, power seats, leather, 6 disc CD changer, aluminum wheels, 146,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995
‘01 Honda Civic LX Power windows & locks, cruise, air, AM/FM, 100,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,995
‘00 Mercury Grand Marquis LS Power seats, auto. headlamps, aluminum wheels, 96,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,995
PICKUPS
‘11 Dodge Dakota Big Horn Crew Cab 4WD Power windows & locks, bed liner, aluminum wheels, 27,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,995
‘07 Chevy Avalanche 1500 LTZ 4WD 4-dr, sunroof, power seats, remote start, rear video, heated leather, hitch, side steps, aluminum wh eels, 90,000 miles . . . $22,995
‘06 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT TRX4 Quad Cab 4WD HEMI, power drivers seat, trip computer, hitch, side steps, Tonneau cover, aluminum wheels, 103,500 miles . . . $15,995
‘06 Dodge Ram 1500 ST Quad Cab 4WD Long bed, power windows & locks, cruise, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 145,000 miles . . . . . $10,995
‘03 Dodge Dakota SLT Quad Cab 4WD Power drivers seat, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 147,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995
‘01 Chevy S10 LS Extend Cab 4WD Power windows & locks, cruise, CD, hitch, Tonneau cover, aluminum wheels, 109,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,995
‘00 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT Quad Cab 4WD Power windows & locks, hitch, bed liner, chrome steel wheels, topper, 178,000 miles . . . . . . . . . $5,495
‘99 Chevy Silverado 1500 LS Reg. Cab 2WD Power windows & locks, CD, hitch, bed liner, chrome steel, wheels, 132,000 miles . . . . . . . . . $5,995
‘99 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4WD Power windows & locks, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 178,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,495
SUVs
‘11 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 4WD Navigation, fully loaded, sunroof, heated leather, hitch, back up camera, 12,700 miles . . . . . . $37,995
‘11 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4WD 2-dr, cruise, 3-piece hard top, running boards, aluminum wheels, 38,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,995
‘ 11 GMC Terrain SLT AWD Sunroof, power drivers seat, heated leather, back up assist, aluminum wheels, 19,500 miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,995
‘10 Chevy Equinox LTZ FWD Sunroof, power drivers seat, heated leather, back up assist, aluminum wheels, 39,500 miles . . . . . . . . . . . $23,995
‘09 Dodge Journey SXT AWD 7 passenger, rear air & heat, power drivers seat, 6 disc CD changer, aluminum wheels, 33,000 miles . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995
‘07 Chevy Tahoe LT 4WD Navigation, sunroof, power seats, 3rd seat, heated leather, hitch, aluminum wheels, backup assist, 9 3,000 miles . $22,995
www.shimkat.com www.shimkat.com www.shimkat.com
for additional information on our big inventory of new and pre-owned vehicles
MSRP SALE
2012 Chrysler 200 Limited 4 dr.
Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, Deep Cherry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,680 $22,130
2012 Chrysler 200 Limited 4 dr.
Leather, Blackberry Pearl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,535 $20,985
2012 Chrysler 200 Limited 4 dr.
Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, Deep Cherry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,680 $22,130
2012 Dodge Charger SXT 4 dr.
Leather, Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, Bright Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,490 $29,290
2012 Dodge Journey Crew AWD 4 dr.
Third Seat, Rear Air, Chrome Wheels, Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,840 $27,640
2012 Jeep Liberty Latitude 4WD
Leather, Chrome Wheels, Deep Cherry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,815 $25,615
2012 Jeep Liberty Latitude 4WD
Leather, Chrome Wheels, Black Forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,870 $25,670
2012 Ram 1500 Laramie Longhorn Crew 4WD
HEMI, Chrome Wheels, Navigation, Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,225 $41,105
2012 Ram 1500 Tradesman Quad 4WD
RamBox, Chrome Pkg, Bedliner, White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $33,050 $27,800
2012 Ram 1500 Laramie Crew 4WD
HEMI, Chrome Wheels, Leather, Navigation, Deep Cherry . . . . . . . . . . . . $47,180 $40,230
inventory
Pre-Owned
2012 CHRYSLER 200 4-DR.
2012 DODGE CHARGER SXT PLUS 4-DR.
2012 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4WD
2013 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
& DODGE GRAND
CARAVANS
$
2,000
rebate 14 in stock and more arriving soon!
Heated leather,
chrome wheels,
sunroof, loaded!
save
$
4,200!!
$
29,290
Only 3 remaining 2012s in stock!
$
4,750
rebate
Stk #19469
Stk #19692
RamBox Cargo System,
save
$
5,250!!
$
27,800
Prices include Shimkat discount and midwest Business Center rebates. Tax and License Fees not included.
CARS
’12 Ford Fiesta SFE 4 dr., Power windows and locks, heated seats, 14,000 miles ................................. $14,995
’11 Chevy Cruze 1LT RS 4-dr, power windows & locks, cruise, aluminum wheels,
XM radio, 14,000 miles .............................................................................................................................. $17,995
’08 Chevy HHR LT Special Edition Power drivers seat, preminum speaker system,
chrome wheels, rear spoiler, 43,000 miles ............................................................................................... $12,995
’07 Honda Accord EX-L 4 dr. Power windows, locks and seat, sunroof, heated leather,
40,000 miles ................................................................................................................................................. $14,995
’07 Pontiac Grand Prix Sport group, power drivers seat, auto headlamps,
aluminum wheels, 72,000 miles ................................................................................................................ $10,995
’07 Chrysler 300 Limited Power seats, auto headlamps, heated leather,
chrome wheels, Sirius radio, 71,000 miles ............................................................................................... $14,995
’07 Cadillac STS AWD 4-dr, Navigation, full power, sunroof,
heated & ventilated leather, aluminum wheels, 48,000 miles ............................................................... $22,995
’06 Dodge Charger SXT Power windows & locks, power drivers seat, aluminum wheels,
122,000 miles ..................................................................................................................................................$9,495
’06 Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Power windows & locks, cruise, CD, 54,000 miles ..........................$8,995
’06 Chrysler 300 Limited 4-dr, heated leather, chrome wheels, new tires, 72,000 miles ..................... $13,995
’06 Mercury Montego Premier AWD Sunroof, power seats, heated leather, new tires,
92,000 miles ....................................................................................................................................................$9,995
’05 Mercury Grand Marquis LS Power seats, auto. headlamps,
CD, leather, aluminum wheels, 92,000 miles .............................................................................................$7,995
’04 Pontiac Grand Am GT 4 dr. 3.4 liter V6, aluminum wheels, full power, 122,000 miles ...................$5,995
’04 Pontiac Grand Am GT 4-dr, power windows & locks, CD,
aluminum wheels, rear spoiler, 103,000 miles ...........................................................................................$6,995
’04 Dodge Intrepid 4-dr, 2.7 V6, full power, aluminum wheels, 100,000 miles ......................................$4,995
’03 Chevrolet Impala 4 dr. 3.8 liter V6, LS package, sunroof, leather, 182,000 miles ..............................$4,995
’02 Lexus LS 430 Sunroof, power seats, leather, 6 disc CD changer,
aluminum wheels, 146,000 miles .............................................................................................................. $12,995
’00 Mercury Grand Marquis LS Power seats, auto. headlamps, aluminum wheels, 96,000 miles .......$4,995
PICKUPS
’11 Dodge Dakota Big Horn Crew Cab 4WD Power windows & locks
bed liner, aluminum wheels, 27,000 miles .............................................................................................. $22,995
’07 Chevy Avalanche 1500 LTZ 4WD 4-dr, sunroof, power seats, remote start, rear video
heated leather, hitch, side steps, aluminum wheels, 90,000 miles ........................................................ $22,995
’06 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT TRX4 Quad Cab 4WD HEMI, power drivers seat, trip computer,
hitch, side steps, Tonneau cover, aluminum wheels, 103,500 miles.................................................... $15,995
’06 Dodge Ram 1500 ST Quad Cab 4WD Long bed, power windows & locks,
cruise, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels, 145,000 miles ............................................................................. $10,995
’03 Dodge Dakota SLT Quad Cab 4WD Power drivers seat, CD,
hitch, aluminum wheels, 147,000 miles ......................................................................................................$8,995
’01 Chevy S10 LS Extend Cab 4WD Power windows & locks, cruise, CD, hitch, Tonneau cover,
aluminum wheels, 109,000 miles .................................................................................................................$7,995
’00 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT Quad Cab 4WD Power windows & locks, hitch, bed liner,
chrome steel wheels, topper, 178,000 miles................................................................................................$5,495
’99 Chevy Silverado 1500 LS Reg. Cab 2WD Power windows & locks, CD, hitch,
bed liner, chrome steel, wheels, 132,000 miles...........................................................................................$5,995
’99 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4WD Power windows & locks, CD, hitch, aluminum wheels,
178,000 miles ..................................................................................................................................................$4,495
SUVs
’12 Dodge Durango Crew 4WD, 3.6 liter V6, 7 passenger, rear air and heat, 27,000 miles ................ $27,995
’11 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 4WD Navigation, fully loaded, sunroof, heated leather
hitch, back up camera, 12,700 miles ........................................................................................................ $37,995
’11 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4WD 2-dr, cruise, 3-piece hard top, running boards, aluminum wheels,
38,000 miles ................................................................................................................................................. $23,995
’10 Chevy Equinox LTZ FWD Sunroof, power drivers seat, heated leather, back up assist,
aluminum wheels, 39,500 miles ................................................................................................................ $23,995
’09 Dodge Journey SXT AWD 7 passenger, rear air & heat, power drivers seat,
6 disc CD changer, aluminum wheels, 33,000 miles .............................................................................. $17,995
’07 Chevy 1500 Tahoe LT 4WD Power drivers seat, 3rd seat, hitch, running boards,
aluminum wheels, 68,000 miles ................................................................................................................ $21,995
’07 Jeep Commander Sport 4WD Rear air & heat, power drivers seat, 3rd seat, CD,
hitch, aluminum wheels, 115,000 miles ................................................................................................... $12,995
’07 Ford Freestyle SEL FWD Rear air, sunroof, power drivers seat, auto headlamp
leather, aluminum wheels, 153,000 miles ........................................................................................................$4,995
’06 Jeep Commander 4WD 7 passenger, rear air & heat, sunroof, power drivers seat,
heated leather, CD changer, new tires, 11 7,000 miles ................................................................................ $12,995
’05 GMC Envoy XL SLT 4WD Rear air & heat, sunroof, 3rd seat, heated leather, hitch,
aluminum wheels, 116,000 miles .................................................................................................................. $11,995
’01 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4WD Sunroof, heated leather, aluminum wheels,
173,000 miles .......................................................................................................................................................$5,495
VANS
’11 Chrysler Town & Country Touring Power seats, remote start, auto headlamps,
leather, back up camera, aluminum wheels, 39,000 miles ......................................................................... $22,995
’07 Chrysler Town & Country Limited Navigation, sunroof, power seats,
trip computer, rear video, heated leather, chrome wheels, 99,500 miles .................................................. $12,995
’07 Chrysler Town & Country Touring Navigation, sunroof, power seats,
trip computer, rear video, heated leather, new tires, aluminum wheels, 121,000 miles ......................... $10,995
’06 Toyota Sienna LE Navigation, rear air & heat, power drivers seat,
rear video, aluminum wheels, 92,000 miles ................................................................................................. $11,995
’05 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Stow n Go, rear air & heat,
power drivers seat, trip computer, 156,500 miles ...........................................................................................$5,295
’05 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Power drivers seat, new tires, aluminum wheels, 114,000 miles .......$6,995
’04 Pontiac Montana Power drivers seat, power sliding doors, rear video,
backup assist, 152,000 miles ........................................................................................................................$4,995
’04 Ford Freestar SEL Rear air & heat, power seats, CD, leather, hitch,
aluminum wheels, 128,000 miles .................................................................................................................$5,995
’03 Chrysler Town & Country Quad seating, rear air & heat, CD, 85,000 miles ....................................$6,995
’02 Chrysler Town & Country Limited Quad seating, power seats, trip computer,
heated leather, chrome wheels, 104,000 miles ...........................................................................................$5,995
’02 Chevy Venture LT Extended Rear air & heat, power drivers seat, CD, rear park assist,
aluminum wheels, 108,000 miles .................................................................................................................$4,995
’00 Chrysler Town & Country LX Rear air & heat, power drivers seat, trip computer, CD,
hitch, aluminum wheels, 106,000 miles ......................................................................................................$5,695
UNDER $4000
’01 Ford Taurus SES 4-dr, power windows & locks,
power drivers seat, CD, aluminum wheels, 158,000 miles .......................................................................$3,995
’01 Dodge Stratus ES Power windows & locks, power drivers seat, CD,
aluminum wheels, 150,000 miles .................................................................................................................$2,695
’99 Dodge Durango SLT 4WD Rear air, power drivers seat, trip computer, CD,
leather, hitch, 148,000 miles .........................................................................................................................$3,995
’99 Chevy 1500 Suburban LS 2WD Rear air & heat, power drivers seat, 3rd seat, CD, hitch, aluminum
wheels, 210,000 miles ....................................................................................................................................$3,295
’98 Ford Explorer XLT 4WD Power windows & locks, power drivers seat, CD, running boards, aluminum
wheels, 179,000 miles ....................................................................................................................................$2,995
’97 Chevy 1500 Silverado Ext. Cab 2WD Power windows & locks, power seats, cruise, air, CD, hitch,
aluminum wheels, 165,000 miles ................................................................................................................$3,995
’96 Dodge Ram 1500 Laramie SLT Club Cab 2WD Power windows & locks, CD, hitch, side steps,
aluminum wheels, 184,000 miles ................................................................................................................$3,995
’95 Ford F150 Eddie Bauer Super Cab Long Bed 4WD Power windows & locks, power drivers seat,
aluminum wheels, 192,000 miles ................................................................................................................$2,295
’90 Buick LeSabre Custom 4-dr, power windows & locks, cruise, air,
168,000 miles ..................................................................................................................................................$1,995
Stk #19692
em, em em,
inventory
Pre-Owned