• warning: Parameter 2 to ed_classified_link_alter() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/humboldt/www/www/includes/common.inc on line 2892.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ed_classified_link_alter() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/humboldt/www/www/includes/common.inc on line 2892.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/humboldt/www/www/includes/module.inc on line 482.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/humboldt/www/www/includes/module.inc on line 482.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/humboldt/www/www/includes/module.inc on line 482.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/humboldt/www/www/includes/module.inc on line 482.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /home/humboldt/www/www/includes/module.inc on line 482.

November 22, 2012

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

2011 2011
Humboldt County, Iowa Thursday, November 22, 2012 $1.25
Area churches ....................4B
Classified
advertising .................. 11A
Community calendar ........4B
Courthouse news .............. 4A
Obituaries ..........................11A
Sports ...................................1B
2 Sections Official newspaper of Humboldt County
Vol. 154 No. 27 USPS No. 254060
See City council, 2A
The family of Rev. Jerry Raether (left to right); wife Barbara, daughter Joy and grand-
daughter Morgan, are pictured with Mickey Mouse during a recent trip to Orlando, FL,
through the Make a Wish Foundation. Read about 13-year-old Morgan’s wish inside this
issue. Humboldt Independent photo.
Assistants Sarah Rasmussen (left) and Katie Sayers (right) display a hand-stitched
quilt submitted by Holly Lyons for the annual Art Encore auction Saturday night at
Rustix. The quilt was one of the entries in the annual local art display, with the items
then sold as a fundraiser for the Humboldt Area Arts Community. Twenty live auction
items brought $2,645, with thousands more taken in on 121 silent auction items put
up for sale. Proceeds from the event go to fund local scholarships and donations to art
departments, art classes and exhibitions and the annual Arts Festival in Humboldt.
Humboldt Independent photo.
By Phil Monson
Humboldt High School will
now have its own girls’ soccer
program.
During Monday’s regular
monthly meeting of the Hum-
boldt School Board, the board
approved the creation of a pro-
gram for girls starting with the
spring season of 2013.
Humboldt began its boys
soccer program 10 years ago,
but allowed it to become a
coed program because of a
strong interest from the female
population of the student body.
With roughly 15 girls in-
terested in participating on a
squad next spring, school of-
ficials feel it’s time to offer a
program for girls.
“We are the only school in
the state to field a coed soccer
team,” School Superintendent
Greg Darling said. “We have
had success with our boys’
program and we were at a
point where we had over 40
boys out last spring.”
“Right now we’re looking
at up to 15-16 girls for next
spring. Mr. Thomas (activities
director) has talked to neigh-
boring schools to see if they
would like to bring over some
of their kids to be on the team
if they are interested,” Dar-
ling said. “I also made the an-
nouncement at our conference
superintendent’s meeting last
Friday.”
“We will have to submit a
program to the state here real
soon. I think it’s time we had a
program for girls. We’ve been
making plans to hire a coach
and everybody is on board
with it,” Darling said.
In a related topic, the board
approved a 28E agreement
with the city of Humboldt
to make upgrades to the old
football field complex in north
Humboldt that serves the soc-
cer program.
School and city officials
will work to improve the field
after completion of the 2013
soccer season. Darling said the
field will be leveled off with
new dirt to be brought in and
new seeding to take place. It
is part of a series of improve-
ments slated for the facility.
“We’ve been in talks with
the city over the last few years
on making improvements to
the facility. We’ve added a
scoreboard and a concession
stand,” Darling said. “The city
would like to take over some
of the upkeep. They have a lot
of programs that are run on the
facility.”
“There are cement pads that
still exist from when it had a
high jump pit and for throwing
events. We don’t need those
concrete slabs and they will be
taken out,” Darling said. “The
school will still own the prop-
erty, but the city will help out
with the different items.”
“This is a good agreement
and it’s exciting to be able to
work together to make up-
grades. We already have other
28E agreements with the city
with the tennis courts and the
By Kent Thompson
With only a few action
items Monday night and
barely a quorum of council
members present, some of the
biggest news at the Humboldt
City Council meeting came at
the end.
Humboldt City Administra-
tor Aaron Burnett reported that
the Iowa Department of Trans-
portation (DOT) has granted
approval for the installation of
amber flashing beacons with
the sign “School Speed Limit
30 When Flashing,” on High-
way 169, at the intersection
with Wildcat Road and 4
th
Av-
enue SW.
The agreement effective-
ly creates a “school zone,”
along the highway, something
Humboldt Superintendent of
Schools Greg Darling was
petitioning for during a coun-
cil work session earlier this
month.
“We’d like to slow down
traffic before they get (to the
intersection),” Darling said at
the earlier meeting.
The traffic control device
approved by the DOT will do
that.
Two programmable, solar-
powered amber flashing bea-
cons will be installed, paid for
by the DOT.
The sign for northbound
traffic will be approximately
200 feet south of the stop sign
at Highway 169 and 4
th
Av-
enue SW. It will be installed
next to a “Speed Limit 40,”
sign, which would be enforced
when the amber light is not
flashing.
For southbound traffic, the
sign would be about 550 feet
north of the intersection with
Wildcat Road.
According to the DOT
agreement, the Humboldt
Community School will have
control of the beacons and
they will be programmed to
flash for a 45-minute period in
the morning when students are
going to school, and a 45-min-
School zone
approved
on Hwy. 169
Flashing amber beacon will
slow traffic to 30 mph
ute period in the afternoon,
when students are going home
from school. The beacons can
be programmed to be activated
for after school-hour events.
“The goal was to slow traf-
fic down approaching the in-
tersection and this should do
that,” Burnett said.
“I know the goal of the
DOT and the city and school
is to have greater traffic and
pedestrian safety in that inter-
section,” the city administrator
said.
“We feel good that the city
and the DOT have come to-
gether to do what’s right for
the safety of students and par-
ents coming and going to the
school. We feel this will slow
traffic down approaching the
four-way stop and we appreci-
ate the city council, mayor and
city administrator’s attentive-
ness in getting this problem
solved,” Superintendent Dar-
ling said.
While the DOT will pay for
the signage and flashing bea-
cons, after installation, the fu-
ture maintenance and replace-
ment responsibility become
that of the city of Humboldt.
The city will also be respon-
sible for electrical utility costs
of the traffic control devices.
It is not known how soon
the flashing amber beacon traf-
fic control devices and signs
will be installed.
Urban Renewal
Council members Joe Ha-
dar, Steve Boomgarden and
John Sleiter were present at
the meeting.
The council approved a
motion to have the Humboldt
city clerk submit a Humboldt
Urban Renewal report to the
Iowa Department of Manage-
ment.
Burnett explained that the
report is a requirement of the
increasing transparency and
accountability sought in the
city’s use of tax increment fi-
nancing.
The city has four active
Urban Renewal areas, the
Northside, South Residential,
Southwest and Central Busi-
ness District.
The city began the last fiscal
year with $670,609 in the TIF
special revenue fund. There
was $282,261 in TIF revenue
taken in by the city during the
course of the last fiscal year,
with $700,867 in expenditures,
leaving a year-ending cash bal-
ance of $252,003.
The council passed sev-
eral resolutions regarding pay-
ments to contractors for capital
project work in the city.
Among them, the board
approved a final retainage
payment of $54,787.91 to
Henningsen Construction
of Atlantic for work on the
10-stall Humboldt Municipal
Airport hangar project.
Burnett said added seeding
cost was swapped out for ad-
ditional concrete to alleviate
potential mud issues getting to
and from the hangar site.
The council approved pay
estimate No. 1 from Wunsch
Construction of Greene in the
amount of $387,000.98 for
work on the Eagle Ridge de-
velopment project.
Burnett reported because of
the mild and dry fall, construc-
tion on the new development
went at a rapid pace.
“Nearly all of the under-
ground utility installation is
completed. Wunsch will be out
of here this week and will be
finished until the frost is out
of the ground next spring,” the
city administrator said, noting
the project is on time and on
budget.
The council also approved
pay estimate No. 2 to Peterson
Contractors of Reinbeck in the
amount of $246,400.41, for
development work on the new
Humboldt Business Park.
“Peterson was very effi-
cient in getting the work com-
pleted in a timely manner and
Humboldt to add
girls’ soccer program
Approve agreement with city for field upgrades
Taft Elementary nominated
for Blue Ribbon Schools Award
Taft Elementary School in Humboldt has been nominated by
the Iowa Department of Education for consideration of recogni-
tion by the United States Department of Education Blue Ribbon
Schools program.
The Blue Ribbon Schools Program honors public and private
elementary, middle and high schools that are either academi-
cally superior or that demonstrate dramatic gains in student
achievement for disadvantaged students.
The Program is part of a larger Department of Education
effort to identify and disseminate knowledge about the best
school leadership and teaching practices. The program has been
in place since 1982.
The program requires schools to meet one of these assess-
ment criteria: 1) the school is high performing or, 2) the school
has at least 40 percent of the students from a disadvantaged
background and have dramatically improved student perfor-
mance during the last five years.
Taft Elementary was nominated for the success in the areas
of reading and mathematics on the Iowa Tests. Scores of stu-
dents at Taft are in the top 15 percent of schools in Iowa. Taft
will receive an application packet in January.
Wildcat Wonderland next to
Taft school,” Darling said.
“The city council will prob-
ably approve the agreement in
another week.”
Conference changes
In administrative reports,
Darling updated the board on
future changes to the North
Central Conference. Bishop
Garrigan of Algona is look-
ing to leave the NCC for the
North Iowa Conference. He
also noted that Eagle Grove
and Clarion-Goldfield are also
strongly considering an exit
to the NIC, which includes
Belmond-Klemme, West Han-
cock of Britt, Garner-Hayfield/
Yes, there are homeless
people in Humboldt County.
One in four homeless peo-
ple are children. Many chil-
dren in America eat just one
meal a day and are starving.
There are more animal shelters
than shelters for people.
Those were some of the
words on a slide show shown
at a meeting on homelessness
and hunger organized by Bren-
da Rush’s economics class
members. The meeting was
held last Monday afternoon,
Nov. 12, in the R. Wesley Carl-
son Auditorium at Humboldt
High School. Grades 9-12 at-
tended along with members of
the public, including elected
officials.
Economics class member
Sarah Rasmussen introduced
the guest speaker, Steve Roe,
director of the Beacon of Hope
men’s shelter in Fort Dodge.
Accompanying Roe were the
shelter’s chaplain, Eric, and
Rob, a person who has been
homeless much of his life and
a resident of the shelter. They
each had a message that was
listened to intently by the stu-
dents.
Roe told the story of how
the shelter came to be. While
serving as a youth pastor at his
church in Fort Dodge, some
youth talked him into going
to a camp with them. While at
camp, he met Shane Clayborn,
who told him the story of his
inspiring visit to the homeless
people of Philadelphia.
After that, Roe and sev-
eral youth started going to
the homeless camps in Des
Moines, bringing them needed
items.
“But they handed us a
whole new heart for the home-
less,” Roe said.
“I always thought they
must just be lazy people. They
changed by heart after I heard
their stories. I figured alcohol
and drugs might be to blame.
But I found that wasn’t the
case,” Roe said.
He told a story of a young
man named “Shady” who
lived in the woods. While still
on the bottle, Shady’s mother
would put alcohol in the baby
bottle until he would pass
out. Then she would go out.
By age six, Shady was steal-
ing beer from his father. His
father kicked him in the head
so hard it fractured his skull in
several places. Shady became
homeless. While homeless, he
was beaten severely. Today, he
shakes constantly.
Roe said after they left the
camps, he’d return home and
lay there in bed in the dead of
winter, hearing the wind howl.
“I could see their faces and
I kept thinking what are we do-
ing about it,” Roe said.
There was a coalition for
the homeless in Fort Dodge.
There was a religious group
that met to discuss homeless-
ness.
“But no one was doing
See School board, 9A
See Homeless, 2A
2A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
anything about it,” Roe said.
“The next thing I know I’m
buying the Masonic Temple, a
15,000 square foot dilapidated
building with no idea how we
would fix it up.”
But the community came
on board. Groups adopted
rooms and people volunteered
and businesses donated.
Each obstacle was over-
come. The city required him
to have an architect draw up
plans.
The architect estimated the
renovation costs at $500,000.
“How are we going to raise
$500,000?” Roe said.
He said the community
came together and the work
was done for $200,000 and its
paid for. Now they plan to ren-
ovate the upper floors, which
will cost another $500,000.
The Beacon of Hope Shel-
ter has space for 40 men.
It’s full nearly every night.
They’ve housed more than 400
men in one and one-half years
of existence. He said some
of those men have been from
Humboldt.
One of the students asked
why the shelter was just for
men. Roe said in researching
what was available in Fort
Dodge, the YWCA provided
shelter for women and chil-
dren.
“Sometimes the man would
have to sleep in a car or an
abandoned building while his
family was at the YWCA,”
Roe said. So we focused on a
need in the community.
He gave examples to the
students about how to mea-
sure success. One success was
a homeless person who ended
up in Webster City and was
brought to the shelter. His goal
was to earn enough money to
get home to Kansas City. It
took six months, but he earned
enough to get a bus ticket. Roe
was in Kansas City for a fami-
ly reunion and found this man.
“He was homeless but
said the Beacon of Life had
changed his life. It taught him
to help others and now he tries
to help others,” Roe said.
Eric, the chaplain, told
the story of how he ended up
homeless as a teenager when
he thought it was cool to do
and sell drugs and be part of a
gang.
“I broke my mother’s heart
and she finally had to ask me
to leave our home,” Eric said.
It was while living in a
shelter that Eric turned his life
around.
“The people in the shelter
told me I was going to make it,
and here I am today,” Eric said.
Rob, a resident of the shel-
ter, said he grew up in a dys-
functional family. At age five,
his father told him men don’t
say they love each other. His
father was verbally and men-
tally abusive to the entire fam-
ily.
“I took on his mannerisms.
I felt I wasn’t worth anything.
Every relationship led to abuse
in some way,” Rob said.
It was while sitting in jail
and facing a 65-year prison
sentence for a crime he didn’t
commit that Rob started to
read the Bible.
“I saw my life change,”
Rob said.
Steve Roe (right), director of the Beacon of Hope Shelter in Fort Dodge, gave an
inspiring talk to Humboldt High School students and members of the public last
week. He was joined by Rob (left) and Eric, shelter chaplain. The senior Economics
class organized the activity as part of Homelessness and Hunger Awareness Week.
Humboldt Independent photo.
Rob said the Beacon of
Hope Shelter offers a safe
place for men to change their
lives. He asked everyone to
volunteer to do something to
help the homeless.
“If you care about each
other, it can change the world,”
Rob said.
Roe said while some shel-
ters kick people out after 30
days or 90 days, the Beacon of
Hopes does not.
“People can stay until they
are healed. Homelessness is
about the brokenness inside
us. It takes a lot of time to
heal. Then people can move
forward,” Roe said.
The Beacon of Hope is a
faith based shelter. They do
not take any government mon-
ey and exist strictly on dona-
tions.
“There were nights we
didn’t know where the food
would come from. But it al-
ways did. Sometimes it was
leftover food from a funeral.
But we’ve been able to feed
everyone each night,” Roe
said.
The residents of the shel-
ter spend much of their day
cleaning, scrubbing, washing
windows. They start each day
at 5:30 a.m. Many worked at
part-time jobs over the sum-
mer.
In response to a question
about the greatest needs at the
shelter, Roe said paper prod-
ucts (toilet paper) and financial
support. He said they do take
clothes and operate a thrift
store out of the second floor.
Volunteers are needed to help
serve meals.
The Beacon of Hope shel-
ter is located at 1201 1
st
Av-
enue North in Fort Dodge.
More information can be
found at: beaconofhopeshelter.
com, or by emailing beacon@
beaconofhopeshelter.com.
Phone number at the shelter is
(515) 955-3366.
Homeless from front page
It was a bitter cold day on
Dec. 9, 1987, when the fire
alarm sounded, calling the
Bradgate Volunteer Fire De-
partment into service.
Imagine their surprise and
horror to arrive at the firehouse
only to discover the call was
because the furnace had mal-
functioned and it was their
firehouse that was burning.
Firefighters were able to
get a chain hooked onto the
1957 pumper truck and drag it
outside.
It sustained much front end
damage with all plastic surfac-
es melted, windows broke and
more. Many dollars ($10,000)
later, the old truck had shiny
new paint, new windows and
new equipment.
Fast forward to 2012 and
the old truck is nearly 56 years
old and nearing retirement.
The city of Bradgate began
planning for the replacement
of the fire truck a few years
ago. The last week of Septem-
ber of this year, Bradgate un-
dertook a letter campaign and
advertised in the local news-
paper that they would appreci-
ate the public’s help in raising
additional funds to complete
the purchase of a Ford LN900
Smeal pumper truck. Their
goal was to raise $10,000.
Pro Cooperative partnered
with Land O’Lakes (Pro Coop
donated $1,000 and Land
O’Lakes Foundation matched
this with an additional $1,000.
The city of Bradgate contribut-
ed $2,800. They also received
many donations from the pub-
lic and other businesses.
“Each was greatly appre-
ciated, whether it was $5 or
$1,000. It all adds up to help
us meet our goal of providing
better service to our commu-
nity,” Nancy Johansen, secre-
tary-treasurer of the Bradgate
Volunteer Fire Department,
said.
They were getting close to
the goal when they received
a phone call from a former
Bradgate area resident. Jody
and Mike Christianson now
live in Montana and they still
receive the Humboldt Indepen-
dent Newspaper. After reading
the article asking for support,
they asked how much was left
to raise. When learning they
needed $1,138.48, the Chris-
tiansons said they would con-
tribute the final $1,000. Mike
is the son of former residents,
John and Phyllis Christianson.
Nicknamed “Big Brother,”
the new (1981) firetruck rolled
into town last week.
“We will need to have the
doors lettered and a few minor
things to this unit such as a
new pike pole, a 20 pound ex-
tinguisher, an axe, a few hand
tools, but it will be placed into
service in an emergency,” Jo-
hansen said. “We want to thank
each and every one of you who
helped make this possible. Our
apology if we missed
someone.”
Businesses con-
tributing included:
Pro Coop, Land
O’Lakes, MidAm-
erican Energy, Com-
munity Lumber,
Bank Iowa, Arends
and Lee, Abens-Mar-
ty-Curran Agency,
Humboldt Vet Clinic,
Hundertmark Auc-
tion, Jet Company,
ADF Systems, Hum-
boldt County REC,
Blacktop Service,
Hog Slat, Wagner
Truck and Auto,
Dixon Insurance Agency,
Rolfe State Bank, Luft and
Son Drainage, Alan Pedersen
Farms, Arnold Brodale Seeds,
Bennett Sanitation, Banwart
Trucking, Rolfe Vet Clinic,
city of Bradgate, and Shirley
Nielsen made a donation in
memory of Larry Nielsen.
Individual donors included:
Bruce Hefty, Don Madsen,
Richard Zeman, Richard Ol-
son, Darrell Satern, Robert
Cran, Dennis O’Donnell,
Robert Lanus, Mitch Naeve,
Jim Day, Max Redenius, Mi-
chael Behnkendorf, Sue Wald,
Nancy Johansen, Berniece
Wolcott, Robert Zeman, Al-
len Brandhoij, Robert Brown,
Joseph Hernandez, Mike Ben-
jamin, Clay Norman, John
Lowe, Mike Christianson,
Sandra and Steve Laubenthal,
Sandy Edler and Tim Edler.
“We are a small all volun-
teer fire and first responder
department. But we have very
dedicated people who strive
to prevent loss of life and the
property of others. We have
seven trained first responders
and 11 trained firefighters,” Jo-
hansen said.
The Bradgate Fire De-
partment serves the town of
Bradgate and 22 and 2/3rds
sections of the 36 in Avery
Township, along with 14½
sections in Wacousta Town-
ship.
That’s approximately 196
people and 23,786 acres of
land.
Pictured is the new (1981
version) fire truck recently
purchased by the Bradgate
Fire Department. It replaces
a 1957 model.
The Bradgate Volunteer Fire Department recently
received a $1,000 grant from the Land O’Lakes Foun-
dation to help purchase a 1981 Ford LN 900 fire truck.
It is a match of a $1,000 contribution made by Pro
Cooperative. “We are pleased to receive this grant,”
Bradgate Mayor Sandra Edler said. “It will allow us to
upgrade from a 1957 fire truck to a 1981 fire truck.” The
Bradgate Volunteer Fire Department conducted a fund
drive with the goal of collecting $10,000 to make the fire
truck upgrade. The fire department provides fire pro-
tection for parts of two townships. Amy Ford (second
from left) of Pro Cooperative is shown presenting both
$1,000 checks to (l to r): Bradgate Mayor Sandra Edler,
Nancy Johansen, secretary-treasurer of the Bradgate
Fire Department; and Fire Chief Allen Brandhoij. Sub-
mitted photo.
Bradgate Fire Department replaces 1957 model fire truck
staying on schedule. We are
wrapping up testing on the
retention pond and have some
work to do to complete the lift
station (west of the site),” Bur-
nett said.
The council also ap-
proved a pay estimate from
Chicago Bridge and Iron of
Plainfield, IL, in the amount
of $215,982.50 for the
500,000-gallon water tower
in the North Business Park.
Burnett said the foundation
and underground utility work
has been completed. Steel is
on site and construction of the
new tower should start in Jan-
uary. Burnett told the council
there may be a change order
in the contract due to the need
to make sure all valves in the
present water tower are operat-
ing correctly. The council also
approved a resolution allowing
the city to issue debt to reim-
burse the city for expenditures
in conjunction with the Hum-
boldt Municipal Waterworks
improvement project.
The resolution allows the
city to use bond proceeds to
pay for expenses while the
State Revolving Loan is being
finalized. Burnett said good
news is that interest on the 20-
year government loan is now
at 1.75 percent.
City Clerk Gloria Chris-
tensen reminded residents that
garbage pickup normally done
on Thursday will be collected
on Wednesday this week be-
cause of the holiday. City of-
fices will be closed Thursday
and Friday this week.
The council also approved
a class C liquor license and
Sunday Sales privilege for
Sundance Lanes.
City council
from front page
Hours: M-F 8:30am-4:00pm
www.fsbwc.com
1301 6th Ave North, Humboldt • 515.604.6420 • Fax 515.604.6425
H
a
p
p
y
T
h
an
k
s
g
i
v
i
n
g
H
a
p
p
y
T
h
an
k
s
g
i
v
i
n
g
301 6th A N th H b ldt
At this time of thanksgiving
we pause to count our blessings.
The freedom of this great
country in which we live.
Its opportunity for achievement.
The friendships we have developed.
For all of these things we are deeply thankful.
Our best wishes for a Happy Thanksgiving!
Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy • Simmons • Riverside • Chromcraft • Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy • Simmons • Riverside • Chromcraft
F
l
e
x
s
t
e
e
l

L
a
-
Z
-
B
o
y

S
i
m
m
o
n
s

R
i
v
e
r
s
i
d
e

C
h
r
o
m
c
r
a
f
t
F
l
e
x
s
t
e
e
l

L
a
-
Z
-
B
o
y

S
i
m
m
o
n
s

R
i
v
e
r
s
i
d
e

C
h
r
o
m
c
r
a
f
t
box spring
event
Limited Time Only!
Free box spring with every purchase of $000 or more
$
000 value!
Queen Set
$
000
45"35*/("5
©2013 Simmons Bedding Company. All rights reserved. Produced by IMAGINE ADVERTISING, INC. www.imagineadv.com. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specs may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors.
FREE DELIVERY • FREE SET-UP • FREE REMOVAL • FREE FINANCING
STORE HOURS:
Monday-Thursday 9:00-5:30
Friday 9:00-8:00
Saturday 9:00-5:00
EAGLE
GROVE
Free box spring with every purchase of $1249 or more
$
250 value!
$
499
Ph. 448-3413
Quality Home Furnishings
Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy • Simmons • Riverside • Chromcraft • Flexsteel • La-Z-Boy • Simmons • Riverside • Chromcraft
1948 2012
64th
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 3A
Rose Daniels, nine, of
Humboldt, a fourth grader at
St. Mary’s School, recently
returned from the 89
th
annual
ARBA National Rabbit Show
in Wichita, KS, where she
placed fifth with one of her
rabbits.
Her Dwarf Hotot buck
named “Winter” was the fifth
place winner in that particular
breed.
There were more than
3,500 exhibitors from the
United States, Canada and Ja-
pan showing more than 21,000
rabbits at the convention in
Wichita Oct. 27-31.
“It was very overwhelming
when we walked in there,” An-
drea Brenner, Rose’s mother,
said.
Rose qualified for the Na-
tionals by being crowned Rab-
bit Princess at the Iowa Breed-
ers Convention on Oct. 6-7.
At Nationals, Rose shared
her knowledge of the rabbits
with the judges as she com-
peted as an individual. Next
year, she’s been invited to be
part of a team from Iowa that
will compete.
“She asks a lot of questions
and she absorbs it all,” Brenner
said.
Rose said she enjoyed
meeting other kids from across
the country at Nationals. Her
days started at 5:30 a.m. each
day and continued into the
evening.
It’s been a rapid rise for
Rose as she bought her first
rabbit just before she turned
eight.
She hasn’t been old enough
to show rabbits for 4-H at the
local fair, so she showed them
during the Pet Show portion
of the fair. She has gone to the
fair in Spencer and numerous
other shows.
Rose is raising her own
rabbits and selling them. She’s
using the proceeds to help her
go to Nationals next year.
“We’re very appreciative of
all of the people and business-
es that helped sponsor Rose to
Nationals this year. She’ll be
wearing a t-shirt with all of
the sponsors listed as she com-
petes in a rabbit show in Fort
Dodge Thanksgiving week-
end,” Brenner said.
Those sponsors included:
Satern Service Center, B and
N Auto Sales, Humboldt Vet
Clinic, Hjelmeland Flooring,
Health Source, Humboldt
Newspapers, JRG Livestock,
MF Foto, Humboldt Realty, C
and D Garage Door, Absolute
Pest Management, Total Look
Salon, Liguria Foods, Cindy’s
Chiropractic, Fireside, Person-
ali-Tees, Bolt 97.7, Humboldt
Co. Extension, Reekers Clean-
ing and The Beach House.
Rose Daniels is shown with her rabbit and one of the judges at the ARBA National
Rabbit Show in Wichita, KS.
Rose Daniels is the
Iowa Rabbit Princess and
recently competed in the
National Rabbit Show in
Wichita, KS, where one
her rabbits placed fifth.
Rose Daniels places fifth in show
After a four-month liquida-
tion sale and store conversion
process, the former Pamida
store in Humboldt has com-
pleted its much anticipated
conversion to Shopko Home-
town and will celebrate with
a grand opening event next
week.
The store, located at East
Highway 3, will open its doors
to the public as Shopko Home-
town at 9 a.m. on Thursday,
Nov. 29, following an official
ribbon cutting ceremony that
will begin at 8:45 a.m. The
public is invited to join the
Shopko team and community
leaders for the event.
The grand opening event
will be highlighted by a $2,500
check presentation to Hum-
boldt High School from The
Shopko Hometown Founda-
tion prior to the ribbon cutting.
In addition, the first 100
customers in line on Thursday
will receive a free $10 Shopko
gift card. A number of prizes
will also be given out through
“register to win” events. Cus-
tomers will also be encouraged
to sign up for Shopko’s My
Extra Savings rewards pro-
gram to receive exclusive sav-
ings each week, 10 percent off
on their birthday and special
e-mail announcements and of-
fers.
Every customer who uses
their My Extra Savings card on
the day of the grand opening
will be entered into a drawing
for a $1,000 shopping spree.
Refreshments will be served
inside the store.
“There has been a great
deal of excitement in the com-
munity through the conversion
process and we’re excited to
finally be bringing the Shop-
ko Hometown experience to
Humboldt,” said Mike Bettiga,
Shopko Interim CEO, Execu-
tive Vice President and Chief
Operating Officer.
“I’m confident that loyal
Pamida customers and new
customers alike will love what
they see and appreciate the
great merchandise selection,
brands, value and service from
the same great team that cus-
tomers are used to seeing. We
look forward to being part of
the local community for years
to come.”
Shopko Hometown com-
bines Shopko’s strong reputa-
tion of customer service with
a broad and dynamic offering
of strong national brands and
high-value private label brands
of apparel, home furnishings,
toys, consumer electronics,
seasonal items, and lawn and
garden products – all in at-
tractive, well laid out, easy-to-
shop store formats that range
from 15,000 to 35,000-square-
feet.
The conversion from Pami-
da to Shopko Hometown came
after the two companies an-
nounced a merger earlier this
year. As part of the merger,
Shopko is investing approxi-
mately $80 million into more
than 170 Pamida store conver-
sions which are occurring in
phases through the end of the
year.
Shopko is owned by affili-
ates of Sun Capital Partners,
Inc., a leading private invest-
ment firm focused on lever-
age buyouts, equity, debt, and
other investments in market-
leading companies.
Shopko Hometown grand opening is Nov. 29
The annual Gemutlichkeit
(German) Dinner will be held
on Saturday, Dec. 1, from 11
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Zion Lu-
theran Church in Humboldt.
The dinner features pork
loin, brats and sauerkraut,
hot German potato salad, po-
tato soup, homemade bread,
beet, dill and cinnamon pick-
les, deviled eggs, fruit soup,
lebkuchen, pfeffernusse and
springerle cookies, black for-
est torte, coffee, water or
milk. Ticket prices are $10 for
adults, $5 for children under
10, with preschoolers free.
Gemutlichkeit
Dinner Dec. 1
A Fridley Theatre
HUMOTA
HUMBOLDT 332-5921
www.fridleytheatres.com
For Advance Tickets And Show Times
ALL DIGITAL PROJECTION
ALL MATINEE TIMES...
2D FEATURES ALL SEATS $3.00
3D FEATURES ALL SEATS $5.00
PG13
NOW SHOWING Thru NOV. 29
THE TWILIGHT SAGA:
Breaking Dawn Part 2
WED: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:20
THURS, (Nov. 22): 4:20, 7:00, 9:20
FRI-SAT Eve: 7:00, 9:20
SUN: 2:30, 7:00, 9:20
MON-THURS: 7:00, 9:20
Major Credit
Cards Honored
Like us on
Free Popcorn Every Tuesday
To All Paid Admissions
School’s Out Early WED., NOV. 21
We Will Be OPEN For Early Matinees!
Happy Thanksgiving!
FREE Merchant Matinee Movie
Admission By Ticket Only
Visit www.fridleytheatres.com
For FREE TICKET Locations At
Local SPONSORING MERCHANTS
10
%
OFF
GIFT CARD
PURCHASES!
Our Annual Pre-Christmas
GIFT CARD SALE!
SALE ENDS SUN, NOV. 25
PG
MADAGASCAR 3
Europe’s Most Wanted
Plus SUN, NOV. 25
At 12:00 Noon Only
FRI & SAT,
NOV. 23 & 24
At 12:00 Noon
And 2:30 pm
Clay Construction
* LOCAL CONTRACTOR *
For all your
home renovation needs.
Call Mike 515-890-1612
* FREE ESTIMATES * BONDED *
*Consult your tax professional for eligibility
BIGGEST
REBATES AND
DISCOUNTS
BUSINESS OWNERS!
Buy a qualiŪed GM
truck, car, or SUV
and you could earn
a tax deduction!*
Immediate eligibility
for an expense
deduction
AND
An additional bonus
of accelerated
depreciation!
CHEVYS
2012 Chevy Impala LT .......................................
$
17,995
2011 Chevy Malibu LTZ ....................................
$
20,995
2010 Chevy Impala LT .......................................
$
14,995
2010 Chevy Impala...........................................
$
13,995
2008 Chevy Malibu 2LT ....................................
$
14,995
2001 Chevy Impala, leather, sunroof .................
$
7,995
BUICKS
(3) 2012 Buick Enclaves, FWD, leather ............
$
33,995
2012 Buick LaCrosse ........................................
$
25,995
2008 Buick LaCrosse CXL .................................
$
15,995
2007 Buick Lucerne CXL.....................................
$
9,995
CADILLACS
2011 Cadillac DTS, white diamond, heated
& cooled seats .............................................
$
32,995
2010 Cadillac DTS, 29,000 miles ....................
$
27,995
2005 Cadillac SRX AWD, leather, sunroof .......
$
13,995
OTHER CARS
2010 Dodge Challenger ...................................
$
18,995
2009 Pontiac G8, leather, sunroof ..................
$
23,995
2008 Toyota Camry SE .....................................
$
12,995
2003 Ford Taurus ...............................................
$
4,995
2002 Mercury Sable ...........................................
$
6,995
TRUCKS
2011 Dodge 1/2T Crew 4x4, 8,000 miles ........
$
28,995
2010 Chevy 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4 .........................
$
24,995
2009 Chevy 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4, 8-foot box .....
$
23,995
2008 Chevy Colorado Ext. Cab ........................
$
13,995
2008 Chevy 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4 .........................
$
18,995
2008 Ford F250 Ext. Cab 4x4 Lariat ................
$
18,995
2006 GMC 1/2T Crew 4x4 ...............................
$
18,995
2006 Dodge 1/2T Crew Cab 4x4 .....................
$
17,995
2001 Dodge 1/2T Ext. Cab 4x4 ...........................
$
7,995
2001 Ford Ranger ...............................................
$
6,995
(2) 2001 Dodge 3/4T Reg. Cab 4x4 ...................
$
5,995
2000 Chevy S10 Ext. Cab ...................................
$
6,995
VANS
2009 Chrysler Town & Country, DVD ...............
$
18,995
2002 Pontiac Montana ......................................
$
6,995
SUVS
2012 GMC Acadia, AWD, leather ....................
$
33,995
(3) 2012 Buick Enclaves, FWD, leather ............
$
33,995
2012 Chevy Traverse AWD,
leather, sunroof, DVD ...................................
$
31,995
2012 Chevy Traverse .......................................
$
27,995
2010 Chevy Equinox LTZ, AWD ........................
$
25,995
2010 Dodge Journey SXT AWD ........................
$
19,995
2007 Chevy Avalanche, leather, sunroof, DVD ..
$
23,995
2007 Chevy Trailblazer, leather, sunroof ..........
$
14,995
2007 Chevy Trailblazer LT, leather ....................
$
13,995
2006 GMC Envoy ...............................................
$
8,995
2005 Chevy Tahoe, heated leather ..................
$
15,995
2005 Cadillac SRX AWD, leather, sunroof .......
$
13,995
2004 Buick Rainier CXL, leather, sunroof ...........
$
9,995
2004 Mercury Mountaineer ...............................
$
8,995
2003 GMC XL Denali, DVD ................................
$
9,995
2003 GMC Yukon XL SLT, sunroof, leather .......
$
12,995
2003 GMC Yukon SLT, DVD, leather ...................
$
9,995
2003 Jeep Grand Cherokee ...............................
$
8,995
4A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
JAMES GARGANO ............................. Publisher
JEFF GARGANO ................................. Managing Editor
JAIME ZWEIBOHMER........................ Sales Representative
RACHEL BOELMAN ........................... Advertising Design Manager
BETSY FLOT ....................................... Office Assistant/Receptionist
DEBBIE KILEY .................................... Office Manager
JEN LARSON ...................................... Advertising Layout and Design
DANETTE MILLER .............................. Production Manager
PHIL MONSON ................................... Managing Sports Editor
SUE REIMERS .................................... Advertising Layout and Design
BRANDY SATERN .............................. Sales Representative
JANETTE SCHAUMBURG .................. Advertising Layout and Design
KENT THOMPSON ............................. News Editor
Published weekly on Thursdays by Humboldt Printing Company at
512 Sumner Avenue, P.O. Box 157, Humboldt, Iowa 50548. Periodical
postage paid at Humboldt, Iowa. USPS #254060.
Postmaster: send address changes to The Humboldt Independent,
P.O. Box 157, Humboldt, IA 50548.
NEWS & ADVERTISING DEADLINE:
MONDAY – 3:00 P.M.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
$47.00 per year in Iowa • $58.00 in other states
INTERNET ADDRESS
http://www.humboldtnews.com
E-Mail us at: independent@humboldtnews.com
Telephone (515) 332-2514 • FAX (515) 332-1505
Advertising Rate Card available upon request.
2011
Way Back When
Courthouse
These five students were winners in a trivia contest sponsored by the Humboldt
Public Library during National Children’s Book Week, Nov. 11-16.
Pictured, front row (l to r) are: fourth grader Andrea Lerdal, daughter of Scott
and Jackie Lerdal, second; and fifth grader Amanda Arends, daughter of Dale and
Paula Arends, second. Back row: fourth grader Jess Blair, son of Alan and Irene
Blair, first; fifth grader Aaron Mattison, son of Sherman and Joann Mattison, first;
and sixth grader Erik Mattison, first. Independent photo, November 1985.
Trivia winners (1985)
TEN YEARS AGO
2002
Grant Kleinhenz was
named the new City Admin-
istrator in Humboldt. Klein-
henz comes to Humboldt from
Fishers, IN, where he has been
Assistant Town Manager since
1999. He will start his new po-
sition in Humboldt on Jan. 6,
2003.
2002
New Humboldt Police Of-
ficer Tony Walter was intro-
duced to the Humboldt City
Council. Police chief Jon Reed
introduced Walter, who started
the job this week. Walter will
attend the Iowa Law Enforce-
ment Academy sometime after
January. Walter is a native of
Corning.
2002
Humboldt High School
football players that received
all-district honors in Class
3A District No. 1 are: Jordan
Beebe, quarterback; Dustin
Anderson, defensive tackle;
Jacob Crossley, defensive
tackle; Jacob Heathman, wide
receiver; and Tim Slaikeu, of-
fensive guard.
FIFTEEN YEARS AGO
1997
Four Humboldt High
School football players were
named captains for the 1998
season. They are Ethan Miller,
Kit Curry, Brad Emick and
Mike Lensch.
1997
Twin River Valley and
Corwith - Wesley - LuVerne
combined for 14 players who
received all-district honors by
the football coaches of Class
A District No. 1. Area players
chosen first team all-district
were Dallas Clark of Twin
River Valley and Ryan Wag-
ner of Corwith - Wesley - Lu-
Verne. Second-team includes
Ryan Fredin of TRV, Jake
Heim of TRV, Mark Kramer
of C-W-L, Lucas Burrington
of C-W-L, Derrick Frideres of
C-W-L, and Nick Garman of
C-W-L. Players named hon-
orable mention from C-W-L
include Adam Bristow, Brent
DeGroote and Pat Trenary.
TRV players named honorable
mention include Mike Klein,
Jered Bratland and Jim Wheel-
er.
TWENTY-FIVE
YEARS AGO
1987
Stan Nielsen has purchased
the Humboldt Coast to Coast
Store in downtown Humboldt
from Lyle and Marion Burns.
New manager of the store will
be Harold Olesen.
1987
Corwith - Wesley - Lu-
Verne -Kanawha, 1987 North
Star Conference football
champions, was represented
by four players on first-team
all-conference by the league’s
coaches. Twin Rivers had one
player chosen. The C-W-L-K
Rebels, who compiled a 5-0
loop mark, 6-2 overall, were
represented by linemen Greg
Guenther and Keith Wilhite,
in addition to receiver Dana
Wingert and running back
Mark Wester. All four are se-
niors with Guenther being the
lone unanimous pick from
C-W-L-K. Dave Weydert, a
junior, was the lone TR first
choice.
1987
The Humboldt Red Pistol
team was third overall in the
Two Rivers League. Members
include Phil McLarnan, Jim
Almond, Dale Hill, William
Holden, Les Bacon and Doug
Bacon.
FORTY YEARS AGO
1972
Jane Meyer, 17, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Mey-
er of LuVerne, was crowned
queen at the 20th celebration
of Homecoming in LuVerne
High School. Attendants to
Meyer were Becky Smith and
Kathy Hurlburt. Escorts are
Kim Nelson, Curtis Barber
and Steve Wickett.
1972
Humboldt’s varsity wres-
tling team whipped Estherville
52-6 with a ferocious display
of early season power. The
wildcats forged wins in 10 of
12 matches and slapped pin-
ning holds on six opponents,
topped by Dan Grause’s
25-second gem at heavy
weight.
FORTY-FIVE
YEARS AGO
1967
Don Boswell of Dakota
City is expanding his green-
house space with the addition
of a 25x17 foot building. The
expansion will increase the
greenhouse space by 50 per-
cent. Glen Nelson and Sons
were contracted to construct
the redwood framework of the
building. The new greenhouse
is located directly north of the
existing houses.
1967
Two Humboldt youths
recently volunteered for the
Army. They were Craig J.
Lewellyn, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Clifford Lewellyn of Hum-
boldt and Marshall D. Day,
son of Mrs. Harry Day of
Humboldt. Both were inducted
on Nov. 15, and are stationed
at Fort Bliss, TX.
1967
The Gilmore City-Bradgate
girls’ basketball varsity squad
members are Rita Jennings,
Ann Hoveland, Zoe Ann Pisel,
Joan Saathoff, Sally Oberhel-
man, Christie Carlson, Robin
Sorensen, Vickie Halligan,
Betty Sorensen, Susie Stearns,
Jennifer Jensen, Jane Juelfs,
and Kathy Peters.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
1962
A “Winter Playland” will
open with the first snow at
the Denton Myers farm, three
miles east and 3/4 mile north
of Humboldt. According to
Mr. Myers the site will feature
ski, toboggan and sled runs,
all equipped with lifts to their
respective starting points. A
modern heated shelter house is
provided for the participants at
the site.
1962
Dr. Frank Tepner, Bode’s
new doctor, will open his of-
fices in the town on Nov. 26. A
native of Nebraska, he gradu-
ated from Creighton Public
High School and attended
Wayne State Teachers College
at Wayne, NE for two years
before transferring to Morn-
ingside College, Sioux City,
where he obtained a B.A. de-
gree. He then attended the Uni-
versity of Nebraska College of
Medicine at Omaha, NE for
a year before he transferred
to the college of Osteopathic
Medicine and Surgery at Des
Moines. He graduated there
with a DO degree in 1961.
1962
Lawrence Lindhart of
Humboldt has been named
Civil Defense Director for the
county, it was announced by
Marcus Rolland, chairman of
the County Board of Supervi-
sors. Mr. Lindhart will assume
his duties immediately.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
1952
Members of the Gilmore
City girls’ basketball team are
Wanda Day, Mary Ann Lan-
sing, Shirley Jacobson, Ruth
Nickel, Donna Smith, Nina
Neel, Donna Claman, Iola
Claussen, Mary Jane Bernard,
Judy Jacobson, Carol Cirks,
and Nancy Stamper.
1952
Members of the Gilmore
City boys’ basketball squad
are Bill Goodrich, Reggie
Hutchinson, David Gleason,
Dennis Ristau, Bruce Peters,
Harry Linn, Gerald McDan-
iels, Richard Davis, Donald
Day, Daryl Granner, Merle
Naeve, and Mike Gleason.
Coach is Gerald Anderson.
1952
Varsity squad members of
the Humboldt basketball squad
are letter winners John Holde-
fer, Jack Hibbard, Neal Sande,
Kent Thorson, Marv Sorensen,
Dale Daggy, Junior Hellick-
son, Don Helvick, George
Whipple, Joe Anderson, Merv
Johnson, and Rowan Schultz.
MAGISTRATE COURT
Joshua J. Andersen, Hum-
boldt, Count 1, 5
th
degree
criminal mischief; Count 2,
trespassing, fined $580.
Melissa J. Wise, West
Bend, failure to maintain con-
trol, fined $200.
Nichole M. Lathrop, Sioux
Rapids, speeding, fined $141.
Erik M. Brandt, Granger,
speeding, fined $141.
Brian K. Buske, Stockton,
speeding, fined $114.
Roger Stringer, Gilmore
City, failure to yield upon left
turn, fined $195.
Bret L. Harklau, Humboldt,
failure to comply with safety
regulations, fined $127.50.
Melanie L. Aanonson,
Barnum, failure to comply
with safety regulations, fined
$127.50.
Larry E. Edgington, Mount
Pleasant, failure to comply
with safety regulations, fined
$127.50.
Curtis J. Bruvik, Hum-
boldt, maximum gross weight
violation, fined $454.88.
Curtis J. Bruvik, Hum-
boldt, maximum gross weight
violation, fined $269.25.
James J. Potratz, Fort
Dodge, failure to comply
with safety regulations, fined
$127.50.
Alexander J. Davis, Hum-
boldt, speeding, fined $168.
Allen H. McGinnes IV,
Livermore, driving while li-
cense suspended, fined $60.
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
DISTRICT COURT
JUDGMENTS
Janet M. Bertram, trustee
of the Janet M. Bertram Revo-
cable Separate Property Trust;
and Judy Skiye Arcuri, trustee
of the Judy Skiye Arcuri Sepa-
rate Property Trust vs. Marilyn
C. Specht and Dean Specht, et
al, petition in equity.
SMALL CLAIMS
JUDGMENTS
Design Homes, Inc. vs.
Lisa Lauckner, Humboldt,
failure to pay rent and damag-
es to an apartment, $2,207.01,
plus costs and interest.
VION Holdings LLC vs.
Paula King, Humboldt, ac-
count $2,356.42, plus costs
and interest.
Precision Recovery Ana-
lytics, Inc. vs. Amy Vinsand,
Rutland, account $1,918.76,
plus costs and interest.
DISMISSALS
Homeward, Inc. vs. Wayne
H. Anderson, Sr., Gilmore
City, verification of account
and affidavit of military ser-
vice.
PROBATES
Estate of Ina L. Clowes,
Deceased, James F. Clowes,
Robert B. Clowes, and Anne
C. Conover, Executors.
Estate of Harold E. Grebe,
Deceased, Mary Grebe, Ex-
ecutor.
COUNTY RECORDER
WARRANTY DEEDS
Janice Kay Squires to Brian
P. Collins, E 1/2, Lot 1, Block
8, Original Town, Dakota City,
E 1/2, Lot 2, Block 8, Original
Town, Dakota City.
Humboldt County to City
of Pioneer, Part of Lot 5, Block
2, Original Town, Pioneer.
Robert Lehman, Sylvia
Lehman to Joseph H. Jacob-
son, Tricia A. Jacobson, Mi-
chael A. Jacobson, Ramona
Jacobson, George R. Streit,
Kelly S. Streit, NW, Sec. 26,
Twp. 91, Rng. 28.
Iowa Bankers Mortgage
Corporation to Federal Na-
tional Mortgage Association,
Lot 5, Block 6, Original Town,
Thor, Lot 6, Block 6, Original
Town, Thor.
Betty Hood to Nickolas
Bowden, Stephanie Bowden,
ATC Ground LLC, NW, W
1/2, Sec. 24, Twp. 91, Rng. 30.
Housing and Urban De-
velopment Secretary to Mi-
chelle R. Erickson, Allen D.
Erickson, Part of Large Lot 14,
Lathrop Addition, Humboldt.
Jason C. Swedlund to Jef-
frey J. Berte, Karen Berte,
Land in NE, N 1/2, Sec. 3,
Twp. 93, Rng. 28.
COURT OFFICER
DEEDS
Palmer L. Larson Estate,
Security Savings Bank, Ex-
ecutor, to State of Iowa, Iowa
Department of Natural Re-
sources, Land in SE, W 1/2,
Sec. 14, Twp. 91, Rng. 27,
NW, N 1/2, Sec. 24, Twp. 91,
Rng. 27.
Ralph L. Bowen Estate,
Russell B. Bowen, Executor,
to Nickolas Bowden, Stepha-
nie Bowden, ATC Ground
LLC, NW, W 1/2, Sec. 24,
Twp. 91, Rng. 30.
CONTRACTS
Humboldt County Housing
Development Corp to Cody G.
Olson, Marta A. Olson, Lot 15,
Eagle Ridge Addition, Hum-
boldt.
QUIT CLAIM DEEDS
Marietta Berkhimer to Beth
A.B. Sullivan, Government
Lot 5, Sec. 34, Twp. 92, Rng.
29, Government Lot 6, Sec.
34, Twp. 92, Rng. 29.
George R. Streit, Kelly S.
Streit to Michael A. Jacobson,
Ramona Jacobson, NW, Sec.
26, Twp. 91, Rng. 28.
See Courthouse, 5A
To The Editor:
Hi! We’re the Blue Roan
Boys, Barney and Benny. We
have been talking to Sadie and
Sam, the Haflingers. They told
us that Dream Carriage Rides
have been busy getting the
sleds and the carriage ready,
along with the New Carriage
House decorated for Christ-
mas rides.
We are so excited. This
is our first year pulling the
Christmas sleds. Trigger and
Digger don’t get to go on the
sled rides, but they get to go
to parades and to weddings all
summer long.
Barney and I have new
shoes and special feed to eat
so we will be ready. There
is a lot of talk about the new
teams that will help out and
fill in when we get tired. Their
names are Andy and Sandy
and Reddy and Freddy.
Sadie and Sam took Santa
in the Chamber Parade last
Saturday. Then, on Thanksgiv-
ing night, that’s when we start
to pull the sleds.
As we clippity-clop down
the streets of Dakota City and
Humboldt, we will listen to the
singing, laughter, jingle bells
and all of the joy that’s in the
air. We trot through Dakota
City and Humboldt to see the
lights and Big Display at Mer-
lin Fort’s home.
Then, in December, we go
to Clear Lake and give rides
for Buddy Holly Christmas
Days, and for their lighted pa-
rade.
Also, in December, we go
to Gilmore City and give rides
for their Christmas celebra-
tion.
After the long season of
summer events, we get to think
of all the fun and excitement of
our first Christmas season with
you.
Sadie and Sam said we will
see small children wrapped in
blankets and elderly people
walking with canes and every-
one in between — family and
friends from all walks of life
and all ages.
Last year, people came
from nine different countries,
23 states and 94 Iowa towns
to have a ride. We sure do look
forward to seeing them again
this year, as this has become
a holiday tradition for many
people.
After the rides, we get to
rest while everyone goes into
the newly decorated Carriage
House to drink hot chocolate,
apple cider and hot coffee.
They can also enjoy a bowl
of chili or beef vegetable soup
and a sandwich.
Barney and I are biting
at the bit to get started, so…
please come and join us and
we can all have fun.
See ya soon.
Barney and Benny
c/o Jim Kellner
Dream Carriage Rides
To The Editor:
Upper Des Moines Oppor-
tunity, Inc. (UDMO) would
like to express our apprecia-
tion to all of those who were
involved in this year’s Coats
for Kids program.
A special thank you goes
out to Dr. Crowley’s Chiro-
practic office and Bank Iowa
for allowing our coat tags
to hang in their businesses.
Another special thanks to all
businesses, churches, service
groups and individuals who
adopted a coat tag and provid-
ed a warm coat for a child in
need.
Because of such strong par-
ticipation, UDMO was able
to keep several low-income
children warm in Humboldt
County for the winter.
UDMO will continue
to receive monetary dona-
tions which can be mailed
or dropped off at: Humboldt
County Outreach Office, Hum-
boldt County Courthouse, 3rd
Floor, P.O. Box 100, Dakota
City, IA 50529.
From all of us at UDMO,
thank you very much. Work-
ing together is making a differ-
ence in a child’s life in Hum-
boldt County.
Mary Ohrtman,
Humboldt County Outreach
Director, Upper Des Moines
Opportunity Inc.
8 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 20, 2012
NEW Cooperative
Corn .............................. 7.42
Oats .............................. 1.40
Beans .......................... 13.65
Markets
Letters To The Editor
504 Main Street • Dakota City 515.332.3234
Pain Kicker • Heart Pumper • Cardiovascular Workout
Fat Buster • Skin Cleanser • Whole-body Balancing System
Toxin Flusher • Stress Eater • Relaxation and Enjoyment
You'll love the INFRARED heat of the FAR Infrared Health System for many reasons.
FAR Infrared heat penetrates 1-1/2" into your body instead of warming around you
like conventional saunas. Full benefit of FAR Infrared saunas is realized in a 100
0
cooler environment than conventional saunas. FAR infrared heat expels toxins from
within - resulting in better pain relief, weight control and an exercise effect.
FAR INFRARED HEALTH SYSTEM FAR INFRARED HEALTH SYSTEM
210 South 25th St.
Ft. Dodge, IA 50501
(515) 955-8200
(888) 293-3761
Mon. - Thur. 9 am - 7 pm
Fri. 9 am - 6pm
Saturday 9 am - 5 pm
Sunday 12 pm - 5 pm
Many
Styles &
Colors
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 5A
Michael A. Jacobson, Ra-
mona Jacobson to George R.
Streit, Kelly S. Streit, SW, S
1/2, S 1/2, Sec. 30, Twp. 93,
Rng. 29.
Michael A. Jacobson, Ra-
mona Jacobson to Joseph M.
Jacobson, Tricia A. Jacobson,
NW, Sec. 26, Twp. 91, Rng.
28.
Joseph M. Jacobson, Tri-
cia A. Jacobson to Michael A.
Jacobson, Ramona Jacobson,
NE, W 1/2, Sec. 19, Twp. 93,
Rng. 29, Land in NE, E 1/2,
Sec. 19, Twp. 93, Rng. 29.
CHANGE OF TITLES
Richard C. Christopher
Estate to Lois J. Christopher,
Trustee, Richard C. Christo-
pher Trust, Land in SE, W 1/2,
Sec. 9, Twp. 91, Rng. 27, Land
in NE, SW, Sec. 9, Twp. 91,
Rng. 27, NE, NE, Sec. 9, Twp.
91, Rng. 27, NW, W 1/2, Sec.
17, Twp. 91, Rng. 27, SE, E
1/2, Sec. 9, Twp. 91, Rng. 27,
NE, SE, Sec. 9, Twp. 91, Rng.
27.
Marjorie French Estate to
Glen Lenning Estate, Frances
Mesicek Estate, Land in SW,
Sec. 1, Twp. 91, Rng. 28, NW,
SE, Sec. 1, Twp. 91, Rng. 28.
Robert G. Adams Estate to
Blanche M. Adams, Gary R.
Adams, NW, Sec. 12, Twp. 92,
Rng. 29.
Robert G. Adams Estate to
Blanche M. Adams, Gary R.
Adams, Land in SW, SW, Sec.
24, Twp. 92, Rng. 29.
Robert G. Adams Estate
to Blanch M. Adams, Gary
R. Adams, Land in SW, Sec.
24, Twp. 92, Rng. 29, Land in
NW, Sec. 24, Twp. 92, Rng.
29.
SHERIFF’S DEEDS
Shane/Shane A. Tofteberg,
Humboldt County Sheriff to
Iowa Bankers Mortgage Cor-
poration, Lot 5, Block 6, Orig-
inal Town, Thor, Lot 6, Block
6, Original Town, Thor.
TRUSTEE’S DEEDS
Roger H. Larson Revoca-
ble Trust, Edward Jones Trust
Company, Trustee, to State
of Iowa, Iowa Department of
Natural Resources, Land in
SE, W 1/2, Sec. 14, Twp. 91,
Rng. 27, NW, N 1/2, Sec. 24,
Twp. 91, Rng. 27.
Courthouse
from front page
The Humboldt Police De-
partment was informed of a
hit-and-run traffic accident in
the Shopper’s Supply parking
lot, Saturday, Nov. 17, at 11:55
a.m.
According to the report,
a 2004 Chevrolet Silverado
1500 pickup belonging to Ray-
mond E. Osborn, Humboldt,
was parked facing west.
An unknown vehicle de-
scribed as a pickup being driv-
en by an elderly male, struck
the rear bumper of Osborn’s
Chevrolet, causing an estimat-
ed $1,000 damage.
In other news this past
week:
Nov. 12
8:15 p.m.—An officer was
requested for lifting assistance
on 8
th
Avenue North.
10:40 p.m.—Received a re-
port of kids drag racing on 11
th
Avenue North. No drag racers
were observed by officers.
Nov. 13
12:15 p.m.—An officer
was requested at Humboldt
High School for a fight in the
lunch room.
4:03 p.m.—Tammy Wil-
liams reported that her wallet
was lost or stolen in the park-
ing lot of Sundance Lanes be-
tween 8:30-9 p.m. the previous
evening.
Nov. 14
11:38 a.m.—An ambulance
was requested on Rainbow
Drive.
3:59 p.m.—Vehicles were
blocking a driver at 1208 5
th
Ave. N.
9:01 p.m.—Derek Ander-
son, 22, Pocahontas, was cited
for driving while under sus-
pension and no insurance.
9:43 p.m.—A noise distur-
bance was reported in the 600
block of 2
nd
Avenue South.
The offending party was given
a warning for disorderly con-
duct.
Nov. 15
1:14 a.m.—A resident on
3
rd
Avenue North asked for an
officer to drive by in regard to
outside noises. Nothing was
located.
8:29 a.m.—A burglary
alarm was received from Dairy
Queen. The alarm was can-
celled. It was an employee en-
tering the building.
6:07 p.m.—A suspicious
person was reported near the
old football field on 8
th
Avenue
North. The male subject was
allegedly chasing a child.
6:53 p.m.—A female caller
requested an officer speak with
her daughter.
7:16 p.m.—A caller in the
600 block of Sumner needed
assistance with a vehicle.
Nov. 16
1:32 a.m.—An ambulance
was dispatched to 6
th
Avenue
South.
1:38 p.m.—The Faith
United Methodist Church was
holding a chocolate Lab with a
collar and no tags.
2:16 p.m.—April Ashby
of Manson said she came out
of the church and her dog was
missing. This was the choco-
late Lab that was taken to the
pound. The owner was reunit-
ed with the animal.
7:36 a.m.—Received a re-
port of trees being burned in
the new Eagle Ridge subdivi-
sion. The city administrator
advised that the subjects had
been given permission to burn.
3:26 p.m.—A purple semi
was reportedly driving errati-
cally westbound on Highway
3.
4:50 p.m.—An ambulance
was requested on 4
th
Street
North for a female subject.
9:38 p.m.—An erratic driv-
er was speeding and littering
on 9
th
Street North.
10:13 p.m.—A caller at the
1810 Wildcat Road apartments
Pheasant Run said a tenant
was cooking something that
smelled like cat urine.
11:23 p.m.—A caller on
Elizabeth Circle thought im-
migration officials were look-
ing for something. Police of-
ficers walked the length of the
trailer court and did not find
anyone suspicious.
Nov. 17
7:09 a.m.—A storm sewer
grate was off in the 400 block
of 6
th
Avenue North.
12:10 p.m.—A hit-and-run
accident was reported at Shop-
per’s Supply.
Nov. 18
9:30 a.m.—Public assis-
tance was requested for a party
moving a long trailer through
Humboldt. Police advised the
party they would need to get
a bigger tractor to move the
load.
4:42 p.m.—A citizen on
6
th
Street South requested to
speak to an officer about park-
ing.
Nov. 19
5:34 a.m.—A male caller
reported an injured deer on
Volberding Hill. The deer was
located on Lone Tree Road
and ran off when an officer ap-
proached.
8:24 a.m.—Maria Antonio
Castro, 24, Humboldt, was
cited for no insurance and no
driver’s license.
8:55 a.m.—Lifting assis-
tance was requested for a sub-
ject on 8
th
Avenue North.
11:21 a.m.—An ambulance
was requested on 9
th
Street
South for an elderly male who
had fallen.
Police respond to hit-and-run accident
The Humboldt County
Sheriff’s Office (HCSO) re-
ported three traffic accidents
during the past week, none of
which involved personal inju-
ries.
On Monday, Nov. 12, a
deer/pickup accident was re-
ported on 110
th
Street, three-
tenths of a mile north of Bode.
According to the report,
Ryan M. Faber, 32, Bode, was
driving on 110
th
Street, when a
deer entered the roadway and
struck the 2002 Chevrolet Sil-
verado pickup he was driving,
causing an estimated $1,300 in
damage.
Two vehicles struck a deer
on Thursday, Nov. 15, at 4:20
a.m., on Highway 169, two-
tenths of a mile south of the
Humboldt City limits.
According to the report,
a deer entered the roadway
and a 2001 Ford Windstar van
driven by Sadie L. Linke, 32,
Humboldt.
A 2001 Mercury Sable
driven by Richard L. Crouse,
66 (at the time of the accident),
did not see the deer lying in the
road, and drove over it.
There was an estimated
$3,000 functional damage to
Linke’s van and minor dam-
age of an unknown amount to
Crouse’s Mercury.
Linke was charged with
driving while license under
suspension.
A single-vehicle accident
was reported Saturday, Nov.
17, at 11:52 a.m.
According to the report, a
2008 Pontiac Grand Prix driv-
en by Jamie L. Ferguson, 34,
Pocahontas, was backing out
of a driveway at 403 3
rd
Ave.
S., Dakota City, when the ve-
hicle struck a utility pole.
There was an estimated
$2,500 damage to the passen-
ger side of Ferguson’s Pontiac.
There was no injury and no
charges were filed.
In other news:
Nov. 5
No time given—Walter
Jensen, Humboldt, reported
a vehicle stolen. The vehi-
cle was later recovered. The
HCSO continues to investigate
the incident.
Nov. 8
No time given—A missing
Dakota City juvenile female
returned home.
Nov. 12
4:28 p.m.—A minor prop-
erty damage accident was re-
ported on 2
nd
Street South in
Dakota City.
Nov. 13
4:01 a.m.—A semi belong-
ing to Five Star Feeds rolled
and was blocking the intersec-
tion at 120
th
Street and Virginia
Avenue, southeast of LuVerne.
The caller said the feed trailer
contents would need to be vac-
uumed. A deputy stayed at the
site until daybreak to alert any
traffic.
12:20 p.m.—Lifting as-
sistance was requested on 15
th
Street North in Humboldt.
5:51 p.m.—Vandalism,
criminal mischief was report-
ed to a home on Ann Street in
Thor.
Nov. 14
8:42 a.m.—An erractic fe-
male driver was reported in the
2200 block of Washington Av-
enue, rural Thor.
No time given—Andrea
Fisher reported harassment
and attempted burglary.
12:13 p.m.—A tree was
reported on fire at 2576 Texas
Ave., rural Thor.
1:13 p.m.—Lara McDow-
ell, Gilmore City, reported a
case of identity theft.
7:55 p.m.—A deputy was
contacted in regard to a civil
custody complaint and alleged
traffic violations in the city of
Livermore.
Nov. 15
4:54 a.m.—A car/deer ac-
cident was reported in the
2400 block of Lincoln Ave.
The female driver called the
LEC, very upset.
7:31 a.m.—Bruce Borch-
ers with the city of Renwick,
reported that a Honda motor-
cycle was left in a city alley.
Nov. 16
8:26 a.m.—A cow was re-
ported out in the 1800 block of
Lincoln Ave.
No time given—Robyn
Kinan, Bode, reported the vio-
lation of a no-contact order.
4:20 p.m.—Garrett L. Ped-
erson, 20, Bode, was arrested
on a Humboldt County war-
rant. He was required to spend
two days in jail.
8:30 p.m.—Received a re-
port of loud activity going on
in Lower Sheldon Park. There
was no one around when the
officer checked. There were
some fresh spinout tire marks,
however.
Nov. 17
1:27 a.m.—A red Ford van
was reportedly swerving on
Highway 169, 5-8 miles north
of Humboldt, headed south.
The HCSO was unable to lo-
cate.
11:52 a.m.—A property
damage accident was report-
ed in Dakota City. A vehicle
backed into a pole.
8:19 a.m.—Attempts were
being made to locate a Dakota
City woman for an emergency
message.
10:25 a.m.—Extra patrol
was requested on Michigan
Avenue, northwest of Liver-
more for items being set out
for an auction on Nov. 18.
6:10 p.m.—A car/deer ac-
cident was reported east of
Livermore by the bridge.
9:16 p.m.—The Renwick
Fire Department was paged
for a grass fire out of control
by the Adams Cemetery. The
department was dispatched,
and were on the scene for 50
minutes to bring the fire under
control.
11:38 p.m.—A domestic
dispute was reported on 3
rd
Av-
enue in Livermore involving a
woman, her baby and a male
subject.
Nov. 18
7:40 a.m.—Unkies in Thor
reported vandalism to a pop
machine owned by Coca-Cola
Bottling Company of Ames.
9:23 a.m.—A suspicious
vehicle was reported on 6
th
Avenue North in Dakota City.
The vehicle was gone upon a
deputy’s arrival.
12:43 p.m.—Received a
complaint of poaching in the
1300 block of 190
th
Street,
rural Bradgate. A deputy de-
termined that no violation had
occurred. The hunters had per-
mission from the landowner
to hunt deer and the animals
taken had been tagged.
2:03 p.m.—Horses were
reported out in the 2200 block
of Iowa Avenue, rural Hum-
boldt.
4:20 p.m.—Two vehicles
were involved in a car/deer ac-
cident 3.5 miles west of Hum-
boldt on Highway 3. The deer
was euthanized and a salvage
tag was issued.
4:26 p.m.—A custody dis-
pute was reported in Liver-
more. A deputy spoke to the
parties and the dispute was
resolved.
Nov. 19
7:29 a.m.—Randy Foth,
Livermore, reported finding
a gray metal safe by the boat
ramp east of Livermore.
Several accidents investigated by HCSO
The Humboldt County Ministerial Association’s annual
Christmas Food Basket Distribution will take place on Tuesday,
Dec. 18, from the Humboldt County Fairgrounds.
Baskets must be brought to the fairgrounds between 10 a.m.
and 6 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 17.
Baskets can be picked up by the assigned people at the fair-
grounds on Tuesday, Dec. 18, between 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.
Humboldt-Dakota City pick up time is 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. All
others are from 8:30 to 11 a.m.
More than 250 families in Humboldt County enjoy a better
Christmas because of this event, which is coordinated by the
Humboldt County UDMO Outreach Office.
Humboldt County UDMO has placed an Angel Tree at the
Tree Walk at Faith United Methodist Church. It is the only loca-
tion for an Angel Tree this holiday season.
People can pick an angel, purchase and wrap the gift, and
then attach the angel to the front of the package so it gets to the
right child. The package should be returned to the Humboldt
County Fairgrounds on Monday, Dec. 17, between 10 a.m. and
6 p.m.
Christmas basket distribution
planned for Dec. 18
Humboldt County UDMO has placed an Angel Tree at the
Tree Walk at Faith United Methodist Church. It is the only loca-
tion for an Angel Tree this holiday season.
People can pick an angel, purchase and wrap the gift, and
then attach the angel to the front of the package so it gets to the
right child. The package should be returned to the Humboldt
County Fairgrounds on Monday, Dec. 17, between 10 a.m. and
6 p.m.
Angel Tree at FUMC
HUMBOLDT • 710 1st Ave. N.
Grocery Dept. 332-4055
Meat Dept. 332-4711
Open Monday-Saturday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Closed Sunday
We reserve the right to limit quantities.
THIS AD EFFECTIVE
THROUGH CHRISTMAS
©2012
Purchase Nonperishable grocery items and help us
stock Humboldt Food Pantry!
Toys for Tots - bring a new unwrapped toy to
Fareway. All toys will be donated to UDMO and
stay in Humboldt County!
Thank you!!
HOLIDAY WREATHS
24” ....................................
$
10
30” ....................................
$
16
36” ...................................
$
20
Decorative
Festooning
69
¢
ft.
- GIFT BOXES
- FRUIT BASKETS
- RELISH &
FRUIT TRAYS
- MEAT &
CHEESE TRAYS
FOR YOUR
HOLIDAY
PARTIES AND
GIFT GIVING
ALL MADE TO
YOUR ORDER!
Christmas
Trees
Fraser Fir
Canaan Fir
White Pine
$
19-
$
49
Tony Christensen
BATTLE THOSE LOW RATES –
WITH THREE TYPES OF INCOME
If you depend on fixed-income investments for at least part
of your income, you probably haven’t been too happy in recent
years, as interest rates have hit historic lows. Nonetheless, even in
a low-rate environment, you can broaden the income-producing
potential of your investment portfolio.
However, before taking action, it’s helpful to know what the
near-term direction of interest rates may look like. The Federal
Reserve has stated that it plans to keep short-term rates at their
current historic lows until at least mid-2015. The Fed doesn’t
control long-term rates, making them somewhat less predictable,
but it’s still likely that these rates will rise sooner than short-term
ones.
In any case, rather than worry about something you can’t
control – that is, interest rate movements – try to focus on those
things you can accomplish. And one achievable goal is to create
an investment mix that includes three types of income: variable,
reliable and rising.
• Variable income investments – Some variable income
investments, such as certificates of deposit (CDs), offer significant
protection of principal, and the value of your investment won’t
change with fluctuating interest rates, provided you hold your
CD until maturity. Of course, current rates are quite low, which
means CDs provide you with little income today, but their rates
have the potential to rise along with short-term interest rates.
• Reliable income investments – When you purchase reliable
income investments, which can include individual bonds, you
have the opportunity to earn more income today, and more
consistent income over time, than you’d typically get from
variable income investments. However, you will likely also
experience greater price fluctuations as interest rates change.
Specifically, as interest rates rise, the price of your existing bonds
typically will fall.
• Rising income investments – When investing for income, you’ll
want to keep at least one eye on inflation – because if the interest
rates paid on your CDs and individual bonds are lower than the
annual inflation rate, you may lose purchasing power. If this
gap persists over time, it could grow into a real problem for you.
Consequently, you’ll want at least some of your investment income
to come from rising income investments, such as dividend-paying
stocks. Of course, not all stocks pay dividends, but with the help
of your financial advisor, you can find companies that have paid
– and even increased – their dividends for many years running.
And if you don’t actually need the dividends to supplement your
cash flow, you can reinvest them to build your ownership stake in
these stocks. Keep in mind, though, that companies can reduce
or discontinue dividends at any time. Also, remember that stock
prices will constantly rise and fall, so the value of your principal
could decline.
As you can see, all three types of income-producing
investments – variable, reliable and rising – offer some benefits,
along with some risks of which you need to be aware. But putting
together a mix of these investments that’s appropriate for your
individual needs, goals and risk tolerance may help you boost the
productivity of the “income” portion of your portfolio – no matter
what’s happening with interest rates.
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local
Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
530 Sumner Avenue • Humboldt, IA
515-332-2431 • 1-800-232-7897
IF YOU’RE NOT AT YOUR LAST JOB,
YOUR 401(k) SHOULDN’T BE EITHER.
To see why it makes sense to roll your 401(k) to Edward Jones, call today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Tony R Christensen
Financial Advisor
530 Sumner Ave.
Humboldt, IA 50548
515-332-2431
6A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
The Cook of the Week 3rd Edition Cookbook is now
on sale! Pick one up at
the front desk. $10.70
(includes tax)
($18.70 to mail)
Great gift
idea!
Cook of the W
eek
3rd E
dition
by Judy Konecne
Cook of the Week
HUMBOLDT MIDDLE SCHOOL COOKS
This week’s cook of the week column
features four ladies who make their living as
cooks: the Humboldt Middle School cooks.
They are Erin Pedersen, Carol Erickson,
Deanne Myers, and Katina Warden.
Erin Pedersen, the daughter of Dennis and
Sarah Nixt of Humboldt, is the head cook. She
and her husband, Andrew, are both natives of
Humboldt and graduates of Humboldt High
School. Andrew, the son of Gene and Karen
Pedersen of Humboldt, is a Sergeant at the Fort
Dodge Correctional Facility. They were mar-
ried Sept. 7, 1996, and are the parents of Jacob,
who is in the third grade and Darla, who will
be 4 on Dec. 1. The Pedersens attend Our Sav-
iour’s Lutheran Church. Besides cooking, Erin
enjoys crafts of all kinds—sewing, knitting,
scrapbooking, and quilting. Andrew enjoys old
cars, Hot Wheels, and video games.
Carol Erickson and her husband, Gary, who
works for the State of Iowa, live in Dakota
City. They are the parents of two children and
the grandparents of one. The Ericksons attend
the Congregational United Church of Christ
and besides cooking, Carol enjoys playing
cards, especially Cribbage.
Katina Warden and her husband, Tim, met
when they were both attending Humboldt High
School. Katina moved to the Rutland area from
Des Moines in 1993. Tim also grew up in the
Rutland area and currently works as an install-
er for Satern Exteriors. The Wardens have been
married for 15 years and are the parents of
three children: Damien is a sophomore, Gavin
is in the third grade, and Paige is in the first
grade. Besides cooking and baking, Katina en-
joys scrapbooking and being a Pampered Chef
Consultant. Tim enjoys hunting, video gaming
and they both enjoy activities with their family.
Deanne Myers met her future husband, Da-
vid, in his hometown of Gilmore City. Deanne,
the daughter of DeWayne and Shirley Kiley
of Dakota City, is a Humboldt High School
graduate. David graduated from Gilmore City-
Bradgate High School and Iowa Central Com-
munity College. He is currently employed as a
mechanic.
The Myers were married on April 23, 1983,
and are the parents of two children: Kylee
and her husband, Robert Myott, reside in Des
Moines and Shannon and his wife, Megan,
live in Festina. Deanne and David will become
grandparents for the first time in January. Be-
sides cooking, Deanne enjoys shopping, crafts,
working in the yard and planting flowers in
the summertime. David enjoys umpiring ASA
softball. The Myers attend Our Saviour’s Lu-
theran Church.
Comfort Meatballs
Erin Pedersen
1-1/2 pounds ground beef
3/4 cups quick oats
1 cup milk
3 tablespoons very finely
minced onion
1-1/2 teaspoons salt
Ground pepper (to taste)
4 tablespoons canola oil
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
In a bowl, combine the
ground beef and oats. Pour
in the milk and then add the
onion, salt and pepper. Stir to
combine. Roll the mixture into
tablespoon-sized balls and re-
frigerate for 30-45 minutes to
firm.
Preheat the oven to 350
degrees. Heat the canola oil
in a large skillet over medium
heat. Dredge the meatballs in
the flour and then brown the
meatballs until light brown. As
they brown, place them into a
rectangular baking dish.
Sauce:
1 cup ketchup
4 to 6 tablespoons minced
onions
3 tablespoons distilled white
vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons Worcestershire
sauce
Dash of hot sauce
Stir together the ketchup,
onion, sugar, Worcestershire
sauce and hot sauce. Drizzle
the sauce evenly on the meat-
balls. Bake until bubbly and
hot, about 45 minutes.
Beef and Hashbrowns
Erin Pedersen
1 pound ground beef
1 can cream of celery soup
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup ketchup
1 tablespoons Worcestershire
sauce
2 cups frozen hash browns
3 slices American cheese
Brown beef. Stir in soup,
water, ketchup and Worces-
tershire sauce. Heat to a boil.
Stir in potatoes. Reduce heat
to low. Cover and cook for 10
minutes or until potatoes are
tender. Top with cheese.
Cheeseburger Pasta
Erin Pedersen
1 pound ground beef
1 can condensed cheddar
cheese soup
1 can tomato soup
1-1/2 cups water
2 cups uncooked medium shell
shaped pasta
In large skillet, brown beef.
Stir in the soups, water and
pasta and heat to a boil. Re-
duce heat to medium. Cook
for 10 minutes or until pasta is
tender, stirring often.
Blender Lemon Pie
Carol Erickson
1 pie shell, baked and cooled
1-1/2 lemons
1/2 cup water
1-1/2 cups sugar
1/2 stick melted butter
2 tablespoons plain flour
Dash salt
2 eggs
Preheat oven to 350 de-
grees. Wash lemons, quarter
and remove seeds. Cut each
piece again and put in blender
with water. Blend well and add
sugar. Blend again. Add flour,
salt, eggs and butter and blend.
Pour into pie shell and bake for
30 minutes. Serve with whip
cream and a sprig of mint.
Serves 6.
Ham Balls
Carol Erickson (from Lisa)
1-1/2 pounds smoked ham
1-1/2 pounds ground pork (not
sausage)**
1 pound ground beef
3 cups graham cracker crumbs
3 eggs
2 cups milk
**Note—our local gro-
cer’s meat department sells a
ham loaf, which is the mix of
the smoked ham and ground
pork. If yours does as well
use 3 pounds of ham loaf mix
instead of the 1-1/2 pounds
smoked ham and 1-1/2 pounds
ground pork.
In a very large bowl or
roasting pan, mix the ground
beef, smoked ham, ground
pork, graham cracker crumbs,
eggs and milk. I like to use
my hands to mix this (wearing
disposable rubber gloves), and
if so, the eggs and milk will be
very cold. Mix the ingredients
until combined. Using a 1/2
cup measure, form 25 balls.
Place in a large roasting pan.
Topping:
1 cup brown sugar
10.75 ounce can tomato soup
1 teaspoon dry mustard
6 tablespoons vinegar
Whisk the topping ingre-
dients together and pour over
ham balls in pan. Bake 350 de-
grees for one hour.
Jalapeno Popper Dip
Katina Warden
8 jalapenos, halved and seeded
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive
oil
(2) 8 ounces packages cream
cheese, softened
1 cup sour cream
1 cup shredded cheddar
cheese, divided
1 cup crushed tortilla chips
Assorted dippers—veggies,
chips, pretzels, whatever
you like
Preheat oven to 400 de-
grees. Preheat a broiler or
grill to medium high. Toss the
jalapeno halves with the olive
oil and roast under the broiler
or char on the grill until soft-
ened and blackened, about 3
minutes per side. Let the pep-
pers cool enough to handle
them; then chop them up. In
a large mixing bowl, combine
the cream cheese, sour cream,
half of the cheddar and all of
the chopped roasted peppers.
Transfer the mixture to a bak-
ing dish and top with the re-
maining shredded cheese and
crushed chips. Bake the dip
until golden brown and bub-
bly, 15-18 minutes. Serve with
dippers.
Pumpkin Cream Pie
Katina Warden
2 cups milk
2 cups canned pumpkin
1 cup frozen whipped topping
thawed
2 packages (4 serving size)
vanilla instant pudding
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
1 baked 9” pie shell, cooled
Combine milk, pumpkin,
whipped topping, pudding and
pie spice in a deep narrow-
bottomed bowl. Beat at low-
est speed of electric mixer
for 1 minute. Pour into pie
shell. Chill until set, at least 3
hours. Garnish with additional
whipped topping and pecans,
if desired.
Peanut Butter Dessert
Deanne Myers
1-1/4 cups graham cracker
crumbs
1/4 cup sugar
5 tablespoons margarine, melt-
ed
Mix all together and press
into a 9”x13” pan. Chill for 10
minutes.
Filling:
8 ounce package cream cheese
1/3 cup creamy peanut butter
1 cup powdered sugar
8 ounce carton whipped top-
ping
Mix together well and pour
over crust.
Topping:
3 ounce package instant
chocolate pudding
1-1/2 cups milk
Mix and pour over filling.
Frost with whipped topping.
Decorate with peanut butter
cups or Hersey’s candy if de-
sired. (I also put some pieces
of peanut butter cups in fill-
ing.)
Potato Casserole
Deanne Myers
1 bag frozen hash browns,
thawed
16 ounce tub sour cream
1 can cream of chicken soup
2 cups shredded cheddar
cheese
1 stick margarine, melted
2 cups mashed corn flakes
1/2 stick margarine
Stir hash browns, sour
cream, chicken soup, cheese
and melted margarine togeth-
er and put in casserole dish.
Mash corn flakes with 1/2
stick margarine and top other
ingredients in dish. Bake at
350 degrees for 1 hour.
Library News
By Nikki Ehlers,
Humboldt Public Library
Director
Are you sitting at home
with your feet propped up
on the coffee table digesting
your turkey and pumpkin pie?
Watching football? I’m right
there with you, except for the
football part. The football
watchers in my family didn’t
come home for Thanksgiv-
ing this year. So my feet are
up, my tummy is full and I’m
reading a book with my dog
Fiona on my lap.
I spent last Thursday in
Britt at a meeting of library
directors from this part of the
state. We call ourselves LINC
for libraries in north central.
We meet four times each year
to discuss library issues and
services. Sometimes one or the
other of us will have a prob-
lem. It’s downright amazing
how many library (and world)
issues we solve by bouncing
ideas around the table. Lunch
is a big part of our gatherings.
In Britt we ate at the Hobo
Café. It was delish! I don’t
think I’ve ever eaten home-
made hamburger buns before.
If you give it a try, stop in at
the library next door. It’s a
homey and friendly place.
This time at LINC, a sales-
man gave a presentation. Often
times, when one of the librar-
ies wants to add a new prod-
uct or service the only way to
make it affordable is to form a
group to purchase and share.
This product was a “platform,”
in salesman-speak, to offer
magazine issues that library
patrons could check out at
home, or wherever, and read
on a computer, smart phone
or e-reader. It’s an expensive
product, so it won’t be coming
to Humboldt this week, but
I’m working on it.
When I told our library
staff about it, I could read their
busy minds. “Oh, no. She has
another great idea. We will be
the ones that have to teach the
patrons how to use it.” And
they would be correct. That
brings me to today’s message
to you. Make sure you take
heed. Our nerves are frazzled.
If you purchase an elec-
tronic device, or receive one as
a gift, why do you automati-
cally come into the library and
ask us to explain to you how to
use it? We offer goods and ser-
vices. We offer books, but no
one has ever asked me to teach
them to read so they can check
out a book. No one ever said
“I see you have movies. Come
over and install my DVD play-
er.”
Your Kindle or iThing or
smart phone is exactly the
same. If you bring it in, we
will be glad to help you learn
to access library materials that
are available for your little
gismo. Often we don’t know
how to use Facebook or Angry
Birds on your device.
Sure, we probably could sit
down and figure it out and then
teach you, we don’t have time,
truly.
If your children gave you
a new vacuum cleaner, would
you ask one of us to come over
and show you how to connect
the attachments?
So, pay attention, now.
If someone gives you a little
shiny screened object for
Christmas this year, ask a 12
year old neighbor child , or pay
a technician to help you learn
how to use it.
THEN, come into the li-
brary and we would be thrilled
to show you how to make use
of our electronic library mate-
rials. I hope I said this nicely.
Are we still friends?
Rebecca Bartelson and Ethan Miller, both of Ma-
son City, announce their engagement and approaching
marriage. Parents of the couple are Gary and Jodene
Bartleson of Forest City and Tim and Deb Miller of
Humboldt. A Dec. 21 wedding is being planned at Im-
manuel Lutheran Church in Forest City.
The bride-elect is a 1999 graduate of Forest City
High School. She has a BA in Education from Buena
Vista University, Storm Lake, and is pursuing her MA
in Educational Leadership/Administration from Drake
University, Des Moines. She is presently employed as a
fifth and sixth grade science teacher, head girl’s track
and field coach and assistant volleyball coach with the
Central Springs Community School District. Her fiancé
is a 1999 Humboldt High School graduate. He has a BA
in Physical Education from Northwestern College and a
MS in Sports Management from California University
of Pennsylvania. He is currently employed as the High
School Athletic Director, elementary and high school
physical education and health teacher, and head base-
ball coach with the Central Springs Community School
District.
Engagements
Rebecca Bartelson,
Ethan Miller
Humboldt Ordinance No. 69.11
ALL NIGHT PARKING
PROHIBITED
No person shall park any vehicle on any
street between the hours of 3:00 a.m. and
7:00 a.m. of any day during the months of
December, January, February, and March.
Ordinance No. 136.03
REMOVAL OF SNOW, ICE
AND ACCUMULATIONS
It is the responsibility of the abutting property
owners to remove snow, ice, and accumulations
promptly from sidewalks. If a property owner
does not remove snow, ice, or accumulations
within twelve (12) hours in commercial zoning
districts or within twenty-four (24) hours
in residential zoning districts, after such
accumulation occurs, the City may do so and
assess the costs against the property owner for
collection in same manner as a property tax.
The City shall serve notice of non-compliance
by first class mail or by posting such notice
conspicuously on the property only one time
during a snow season.
Thank You!
Te Humboldt Wildcat Wrestling Club
would like to extend a huge “Thank You”
to all wrestlers, coaches, referees, parents,
grandparents, supporters, high school
janitorial staf, and all the wonderful
volunteers for another successful Wildcat
Wrestling Club Tournament. Your dedication,
hard work, and support of the wrestlers and
our club are greatly appreciated.
Get Your Tan On
Paradise Tans
Black Friday Special
20 points for $20
(limit 2 packages)
- ALSO - 25% OFF LOTIONS
812 15th St. N., Humboldt • 515-604-6340
Thank You for your support
in the election for County Supervisor
~ Rick Pedersen
paid for by Rick Pedersen, 2555 Lone Tree Rd., Humboldt
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 7A
HAEDYN JO
BJORKLUND
Allix Bjorklund and Daniel
Contreras, Jr. of Gilmore City
became the parents of a daugh-
ter born Friday, Nov. 16, 2012,
at Iowa Specialty Hospital,
Clarion. She has been named
Haedyn Jo and weighed 5
pounds 10 ounces.
Grandparents are Michelle
and Lance Heuser of Manson,
Daniel Contreras, Sr. of Gilm-
ore City, and Tomasa Gomez
of Missouri. Great-grandpar-
ents are Gene and Cleo Boles
of Gilmore City, and Arnold
and Marcia Bjorklund of Ren-
wick.
OLIVER RONALD
BURNETT
Aaron and Leah Burnett of
Humboldt became the parents
of a son born Tuesday, Oct.
25, 2012, at Trinity Regional
Medical Center, Fort Dodge.
He has been named Oliver
Ronald and weighed 9 pounds
8 ounces. He joins a sister,
Adeline, at home.
Grandparents are Amy
Sparby of Humboldt, and Paul
Roberts of Roatan, Honduras.
Births
By Carolyn Saul Logan
Humboldt and Dakota
City were not around for the
first presidential resolution
establishing a “Day of Pub-
lic Thanksgiving,” signed by
General George Washington in
1789.
The two towns had been
settled for only a short time in
1863, when President Abra-
ham Lincoln proclaimed that
Thanksgiving was to be cel-
ebrated on the last Thursday in
November. Franklin D. Roos-
evelt changed it to the second
to last Thursday in 1939, in
order to give more time for
Christmas shopping.
So Thanksgiving has been
regularly celebrated in Hum-
boldt and Dakota City from
the beginning of its existence.
It is interesting to look back
and see how the holiday was
celebrated in those early years.
In 1900, there were only 1,474
people in Humboldt and 362
in Dakota City. So everybody
knew everybody else and the
paper’s local happenings page
was full of short notices tell-
ing how a large number of the
population celebrated the holi-
day and whom they celebrated
it with.
The Humboldt County Re-
publican of Nov. 21, 1901,
gives a good cross section of
local happenings for Thanks-
giving.
First of all, the editor
wanted to know “Who is go-
ing to furnish the editor with
a Thanksgiving turkey? Don’t
all speak at once.” Evidently,
out of the less than 2,000
people in Humboldt, there was
someone who would answer
that call and provide a turkey.
Oyster suppers were popu-
lar. The R. N. of A of Rutland
was serving an oyster and gen-
eral supper at Jensen’s Hall.
Will Strachan in East Unique
was also serving an oyster sup-
per on the Wednesday before
Thanksgiving. There was to be
a Thanksgiving social at the W.
A. Sigaby home, given under
the auspices of the Epworth
League, which was the youth
organization in the Methodist
Church. There would be light
refreshments and a short pro-
gram for 10 cents. Ten cents
from 1900 would be worth
$2.76 today.
“A first class live moving
picture entertainment,” was
to be presented in the Op-
era House on Thanksgiving
evening. At least 20 moving
picture films were promised,
some short (only 50 feet)
and some longer (400 feet in
length.) A “large number” of
reserved seats had been sold
out and everyone was urged to
“get your tickets early.” Prices
10, 25 and 35 cents.”
There was a masquerade
ball in Rutland on Thanksgiv-
ing evening. In Humboldt; a
party of 20 children were en-
tertained at the E. O. Bradley
house on Thanksgiving Day.
“All the little ones report a
splendid time.” One of the lit-
tle ones was Bradley’s daugh-
ter, Bernice, known to many of
today’s Humboldt and Dakota
City residents as Mrs. Bernice
Smith, longtime teacher at
HHS.
If you did not want to pre-
pare the usual Thanksgiving
meal yourself, The Elite Bak-
ery was willing to help you
out.
You only had to call for
what you wanted and “you can
get everything smoking hot
just the time you want.” F. E.
Carley was the proprietor of-
fering, as well as a Thanksgiv-
ing meal, the choicest range of
high-grade chocolates in town.
As it is today, shopping
for Christmas was advertised
heavily in the newspapers
around Thanksgiving Day. J.
H. Rine and Son offered items
that very few people would be
interested in today: lengths of
chiffon embroidery, handker-
chief linen and laces for hand-
kerchiefs.
Hubbard’s Drug Store had
as wide a range of items for
sale as many large drugstores
today. During Thanksgiving
week, Hubbard’s advertised a
partial list of their new books
on sale. This included The
Redemption of David Corson,
The Gentleman from Indiana,
The Cardinal’s Snuff Box, Al-
ice of Old Vincennes and Elea-
nor.
Many of these books that
were published in the late
1800s are still available today.
The Cardinal’s Snuff Box was
published in 1898, the first of
Henry Harland’s “Catholic”
novels after his conversion in
1897. Described as “A charm-
ing and witty romance set in
turn-of-the-century Italy,” you
can buy a copy for as little as
$3.49.
Hubbard’s Thanksgiving
ad stated, “Our stock of toys is
immense.” It offered iron, tin,
wooden and mechanical toys.
For boys there were swords
and pistols and guns. There
were “Dolls! Dolls! Dolls!”
for girls: rubber, bisque and
kid body dolls, all manner of
doll heads, doll beds and cra-
dles.
In 1914, local volunteer
firemen had their Thanksgiv-
ing Day meal disturbed by two
fires. The first was for a weed
and grass patch west of Wesley
Marsh’s that threatened some
of the buildings and the second
for a fire in a pile of rubbish at
the rear of the Racket Store.
On the local happenings
page for that year, there were
24 items telling where and
how and who with locals were
spending the holiday.
There are many more peo-
Painting depicting the
first Thanksgiving.
ple in Humboldt and Dakota
City now and the newspaper
does not carry lists of who
celebrated where and when.
However, the holiday still re-
mains one when family and
friends gather and eat a meal
together. For that, we can all
still give thanks.
A look at past Thanksgivings celebrated in Humboldt
COOPER AND KATIE THOMPSON
Katie Oliver, Cooper Thompson
exchange vows July 6
Cooper M. Thompson and
Katie C. Oliver were united in
marriage Friday, July 6, 2012,
at the St. Joseph Catholic
Church in Milford, with Father
Flanagan officiating.
The bridegroom is the son
of Randy and Marlene Thomp-
son of Humboldt. Grandmoth-
ers of the bridegroom are
Aleda Nissen of Humboldt and
Joan Thompson of Holiday,
FL. The bride is the daughter
of Mike and Chris Oliver of
Roland. Grandparents of the
bride are Maurice and JoAnn
Blair of Swea City and Jim
Oliver of Bancroft.
The bride was escorted by
her father.
Maid of honor was Maddie
Oliver of Roland, sister of the
bride. Bridesmaids were Alys-
sa Reimers of Fort Dodge and
Tara Hamilton of Spirit Lake,
friends of the bride.
The flower girl was Grace
Ritland and the ring bearer
was Luke Thoreson, family
friends of the bride.
Best man was John Stoebe
of Humboldt, friend of the
bridegroom. Groomsmen were
Ben Weigel of Humboldt and
Ben Roscamp of Des Moines.
Bell assistants were Caden
and Camryn Thoreson of Ro-
land.
Serving as ushers were
Brett McArtor, Sam Hiscocks,
and Matt Berte, friends of the
bridegroom.
Following the wedding
ceremony a reception in the
couple’s honor was held in
Spencer. Host and hostesses
were Jeff and Lisa Tjelta,
friends of the bride and Terry
and Annette Thompson, aunt
and uncle of the bridegroom.
The couple took a wedding
trip to Charleston, S.C.
The bride is a graduate of
Mercy College of Health Sci-
ences with a Bachelor’s degree
in Science and Nursing. She is
currently employed with Mc-
Farland Clinic in Ames. The
bridegroom is a graduate of
Iowa State University with a
Bachelor’s degree in Manage-
ment Information Systems and
is employed with Tek Systems
in Des Moines. The couple is
at home in Ankeny.
Two Rivers Timber Ghost Humboldt County
Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation do-
nated 28 turkeys to the Humboldt County Food Pan-
try for the holiday season. This donation was made
possible from the funds raised from their 2012 ban-
quet. The next banquet is being planned for March
9, 2013.
Jack Bradley of Two Rivers Timber Ghost and
Gary Goetch of the Humboldt Food Pantry are pic-
tured above.
Turkey donation made
The Worth While Club met
Nov. 13. The meeting began
with a tour of the Arts Coun-
cil facility. Candy Dreschler
was the tour guide for this
event and she was most infor-
mative and delightful. After
the tour, members returned
to Dakota City to resume the
business meeting. President
Kathy Eck called the meet-
ing to order with 10 members
present. Refreshments were
served by Phyllis and Sharon.
A tour of homes decorated for
Christmas is scheduled for the
Dec. 11 meeting. Members
will meet at Bernie Eckberg’s
home at 1 p.m. Homes on the
tour are Sharon Strutzenberg,
Robyn Kocher and Bernie
Eckberg. Refreshments will
be served at Bernie Eckberg’s
home after the tour.
Worth While Club met Nov. 13
Quality First
Girl Scout troop 24 and their
Leader Jessica Habhab
spent an evening with us.
The photo shows residents
of South Care, Pauline
Bowman and Roberta
Mather working hard putting
bell crafts together that
will hang on the South
Care Christmas Tree at
the popular Faith United
Methodist Christmas Tree
Walk. Thank you to Girl
Scout Troop 24 for helping
us out with this project. Here at South Care Center we are fortunate to have many groups
volunteer their time. BINGO, crafts, and music are always on our busy activity calendar of
events. We would love to include your group to our list of volunteers.
Residents and staff of South Care wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving.
H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
V
o
l. 2
H
e
r
i
t
a
g
e
V
o
l. 2
A
C
E
L
E
B
R
A
T
IO
N
O
F
O
U
R
P
A
S
T
IN
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
1 box of Humboldt County’s Heritage Vol. 2,!
Just 28 books available. Come get yours before
the supply runs out. First come, first served.
$39.95 each, plus tax
Humboldt Newspapers
512 Sumner Avenue (next to Bank IA)
8A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
By Kent Thompson
The Humboldt County
Board of Supervisors received
two dozen bids for county
properties Monday with the
high bids for five county shops
and an undeveloped piece of
ground totaling more than
$100,000.
The county agreed to ad-
vertise for sale by sealed bid,
county maintenance sheds in
the towns of Thor, Ottosen,
Livermore, Hardy and Bode,
as well as the site of the former
county shop in Bradgate.
The action came after the
recent completion of a 9,000
square foot shop in Bode and
a 7,800 square foot shop in
Hardy.
Most of the old shops are
about 1,000 square feet in size
and are masonry-constructed
buildings. Many of them were
built in the 1930s.
Here is a list of the bids re-
ceived Monday, with the high
bid listed first.
Bradgate Shop
Joe Hernandez, Bradgate,
$376
Pro-Coop, Pocahontas, $250
Ottosen Shop
Dan Bennett, Ottosen, $7,990
Jess Welter, Ottosen, $5,757
Bode Shop
NEW Coop, Humboldt,
$50,101
Mark Spalding, Bode, $32,500
Hardy Shop
Gold Eagle Coop, Goldfield,
$25,000
Dennis Lippolt/Kevin Speich,
Hardy, $7,050
Robert Johnson, no address
given, $3,556
Fred Weers, Badger, $2,521
Livermore Shop
Billie Scott, Livermore,
$12,751
John Gales, Livermore,
$4,252.99
Bruce Bratland, Livermore,
$3,601
Robert Foth, Livermore,
$2,582
Elden Landolt, Livermore,
$2,000
Thor Shop
City of Thor, $12,101
Larry Minikis, Thor, $8,100
Mark Tokheim, Thor, $5,500
Henry Whitmer, Thor, $5,100
Richard Duneman, Fort
Dodge, $5,000
Todd Groat, Thor, $4,444
Fred Weers, Badger, $1,500
Robert Johnson, no address
given, $1,278
Craig Thompson, Thor,
$599.99
The supervisors took no of-
ficial action at Monday’s meet-
ing but will review the bids
and make sure everything is in
order, with a final awarding of
the properties expected at the
Nov. 26 meeting.
The county reserves the
right to accept or reject any or
all bids.
The buildings are being
sold as is, with the possession
date on or before Jan. 1, 2013.
County Engineer Paul Ja-
cobson said it is yet to be de-
termined if the county will
have an auction for any items
not part of the sale of the
buildings.
Jacobson told the board
that the Lane Timbert Bridge
located on 260
th
Street east of
Kentucky Avenue has been
closed at the recommenda-
tion of Shuck-Britson, the Des
Moines engineering firm in
charge of bridge inspections
for the county. The bridge has
been load rated for a limit of
five tons for a number of years.
The supervisors were not
immediately sure if the bridge
would be replaced or not .
There may be some special
circumstances in trying to re-
place the bridge with a double
box culvert because of the lack
of right of way. The supervi-
sors are expected to discuss
the matter further.
Jacobson told the board
that the county has been
awarded a $133,500 Traffic
Safety Improvement Grant
from the Iowa Department of
Transportation.
The grant will be used to
make safety improvements on
County Road C-20, 1.5 miles
east of Livermore. There will
be shoulder widening and
rumble strips approaching
curves in the road. The work is
expected to be bid during the
summer of 2013.
The board approved a
quote from Martin Marietta
for 2012 ice control materials.
The materials would include
washed sand from the Bor-
mann Quarry at a cost of $6
per ton, 1/2-inch or 3/8-inch
washed chips from the Moore
Quarry at $8.05 per ton and
mansand from the Moore or
Pedersen Quarries at $4.95 per
ton.
The board also approved
a work in the country right of
way request from Brent Kue-
hnast to connect to a private
tile line along the west side of
Section 12 in Beaver Town-
ship. Jacobson said nearby
property owners will be in-
formed before any work is
done.
In other road matters, the
board approved a variance to
allow an existing driveway
to remain for homeowner ac-
cess by Alex Bloomquist. The
county had put in a new drive-
way to access a new machine
shed on the property.
The board reconvened as
drainage trustees and heard an
annexation and reclassification
report on Drainage District
No. 61 from drainage engineer
Rick Hopper with Jacobson-
Westergard and Associates of
Estherville.
The drainage work will be
done along sections of Bloody
Run Creek in central Wacousta
Township, east and southeast
of County Road P-20.
The board approved the re-
port and set a final annexation
and reclassification hearing for
9 a.m. and 9:15 a.m., Wednes-
day, Jan. 2, 2013.
The board entered into
closed session twice during the
morning meeting, once with
the county engineering staff
and another regarding county
drainage.
The closed sessions were
under Iowa Code Section 21.5
(1c), “To discuss strategy with
legal counsel in matters that
are presently in litigation, or
where litigation is imminent.”
The board took no action
on any matters discussed upon
returning to open session.
Bids for county shops bring over $100k
By Kent Thompson
Humboldt County will
be pursuing a county social
service coordinator after ac-
tion by the Humboldt County
Board of Supervisors in a spe-
cial afternoon meeting Tues-
day, Nov. 13.
The board unanimously
approved going ahead with
advertising for the position,
which will be a shared full-
time job with Wright and
Pocahontas counties, Hum-
boldt County Supervisor Chair
Jerry Haverly explained.
“The person will be an
assistant to Social Services
Director Brad Leckrone. The
person will need a degree in
social services and will be
paid a wage of around $18
per hour,” Haverly said. The
employee will be housed out
of the Wright County office in
Clarion, but will be available
to help in Humboldt County,
assisting Kathy Erickson.
Haverly said Leckrone is
currently in Humboldt County
about one-and-one-half days
per week.
The board approved a num-
ber of payment and work re-
quests from County Engineer
Paul Jacobson regarding sec-
ondary roads.
One of the larger ticket
items were new communica-
tion radios for the department.
The board evaluated informa-
tion provided by Jacobson and
reviewed two quotes for equip-
ment and installation, one pro-
vided by Electronic Engineer-
ing Company of Fort Dodge
and the other from Electronic
Specialties Inc., of Algona.
While the initial quote
from Electronic Engineering
was about $700 cheaper, it did
not include separate amplified
speakers with a separate power
source for the county engi-
neer’s office, which Jacobson
said was crucial to maintain-
ing communications while not
interfering with the office ac-
tivities at the office.
Jacobson also said that
Electronic Engineering could
not convert three Kenwood ra-
dios out of pickups to narrow
band wavelength width while
Electronic Specialties could.
The board ended up ap-
proving the bid from Electron-
ic Specialties in the amount of
$11,023.36.
The bid will include six
new radios, two new hand-
held radios, three remotes for
the engineer’s office, as well as
base units for the new shops in
Bode and Hardy, and a recon-
ditioning of the radios men-
tioned.
The board set Monday,
Nov. 19, at 10 a.m. as the date
and time for a public hearing
and the receipt of bids for the
sale of county maintenance
shops in the towns of Thor,
Hardy, Ottosen, Livermore
and Bode, as well as an unim-
proved bare lot in the town of
Bradgate.
In other engineering mat-
ters, the board approved a final
retainage payment to Weide-
mann Inc., Dows, for a box
culvert in Corinth Township
that was completed late this
past summer. The final pay-
ment was $1,456.38 on the
$48,546 project.
The board approved a pay-
ment of $6,217.70 to Peterson
Construction Inc., of Rein-
beck, for a nearly $160,000
twin box culvert construction
project in Corinth Township
this past summer. Jacobson
said the project is cleared out
with the exception of about
$4,800 in retainage remaining
to be paid.
The board also approved a
work permit in the county right
of way request from Jensen
Drainage on behalf of Norman
Olson for tile work. Olson will
be connecting to the Drainage
District No. 103 main tile in
Section 21 of Delana Town-
ship.
In another drainage matter,
the board authorized drain-
age engineer Rick Hopper of
Jacobson-Westergard and As-
sociates to evaluate a drainage
ditch crossing in Section 21 of
Corinth Township. Drainage
clerk Trish Egli said the struc-
ture might have to be 45 feet
wide by 50 feet long and might
have to be constructed in sec-
tions.
The board also approved
bi-monthly general claims
of $148,985.69 and drainage
Supervisors approve social service position, radios for secondary roads
By Carol Hallman
This year the annual Christ-
mas concert is entitled “Awak-
en and Prepare,” as local musi-
cians ring in the Advent season
and await the birth of Jesus
Christ.
The concert is Sunday, Dec.
2, at 6 p.m., at Resurrection of
Our Lord Catholic Church in
Pocahontas.
The featured groups in-
clude the Pocahontas Commu-
nity Chorus under the direc-
tion of Andrea Christians; the
Pocahontas Community Band
under the direction of Rollie
Jensen; and the Hope United
Methodist Bell Choir under
the direction of Linda Fergu-
son. Sharyn Cook is accompa-
nist for the chorus.
“We have many musically-
talented families in our com-
munities,” commented Chris-
tians, “and this year I thought
it would be nice to add a chil-
dren’s choir to join the adults
on several selections. It’s a
wonderful opportunity for the
children, and the audience will
appreciate their angelic voic-
es!”
The community chorus
began rehearsals in mid-Sep-
tember in preparation for the
early December concert. The
group boasts members from
Pocahontas, Pomeroy, Palmer,
Fonda, Rolfe, Havelock, and
Humboldt.
The band also includes
members from several area
communities rich in musical
talent.
“This year the chorus is
grateful for the financial sup-
port from local businesses and
individuals in our fund drive to
help defray expenses,” noted
member Jeff Smith, “which is
a welcome sign that our com-
munity supports the fine arts.”
The time of the concert was
changed to 6 p.m. this year in
order to incorporate candle-
light during the concert, which
will give the sanctuary and the
music within a special glow.
There is no admission
charge, however a freewill of-
fering will be taken during the
concert. Refreshments will be
served following the concert in
Holy Name Hall in the base-
ment of the church. Everyone
is welcome to attend this spe-
cial holiday music and fellow-
ship!
‘Awaken and Prepare’ musically
welcomes the Advent season
Mid term reports
Mid Term Reports for
CWL elementary students will
be sent home with students
the last week in November. If
you do not receive your child’s
Mid Term Report, please con-
tact the school at 882-3357.
Box tops and labels
The school is again col-
lecting box tops and soup la-
bels. The fourth graders will
be collecting them and count-
ing them. These two websites,
www.boxtopsforeducation.
com or www.labelsforeduca-
tion.com, list the products that
have the box tops and labels
that are accepted.
Emergency school closing
If it becomes necessary to
close school because of ex-
tremely adverse weather or
other unforeseen emergen-
cies, the information will be
broadcast over radio stations
KLGA (Algona) 92.7 FM,
KHBT (Humboldt) 97.7 FM,
WHO (Des Moines) 1040 AM,
KJYL (Eagle Grove) 100.7,
TV stations WHO Channel 13,
KCCI Channel 8, WOI Chan-
nel 5, and KIMT Channel 3.
Recycling
On Tuesday, Oct. 30, the
second grade class had a pro-
gram about recycling with the
Kossuth County Naturalist, Ju-
lie Fosado.
She read a book to the class
about recycling and talked
about how to recycle. They
learned about the three impor-
tant Rs (reduce, reuse and re-
cycle). The class learned about
some things we use every day
that are and are not recyclable.
Make sure to ask your children
about the importance of recy-
cling.
CWL Christmas concerts
It’s time to enjoy holiday
music through the schools at
CWL. Please mark your calen-
dars with the following dates:
Dec. 6, elementary concert
at LuVerne, 7 p.m.; Dec. 13,
junior high and senior high
school concert at Corwith, 7
p.m.
News from C-W-L School
If you are a Hispanic or
woman farmer who feels you
were discriminated against
when seeking USDA farm
loans between 1981 and 2000,
you have until March 25, to
submit a claim with USDA.
As part of continued ef-
forts to close the chapter on
allegations that discrimina-
tion occurred in past decades,
USDA established a process to
resolve the claims of Hispanic
and women farmers and ranch-
ers who assert that they were
discriminated against when
seeking USDA farm loans.
The maximum cash recovery
is set at $250,000. The process
offers a streamlined alternative
to litigation for each Hispanic
or woman farmer and rancher
who can prove that USDA de-
nied their loan or loan servic-
ing for discriminatory reasons
for certain time periods.
The voluntary claims pro-
cess will make available at
least $1.33 billion for cash
awards and tax relief pay-
ments, plus up to $160 million
in farm debt relief, to eligible
Hispanic and women farmers
and ranchers.
There are no filing fees
or other costs to claimants to
participate in the program.
Participation is voluntary, and
the program does not preclude
individuals who opt not to par-
ticipate from pursuing their
cases in court.
Individuals interested in
participating in the claims pro-
cess may register to receive a
claims package, or may obtain
more information, by visiting
www.farmerclaims.gov.
Individuals can register to
receive a claims package by
calling the Farmer and Ranch-
er Call Center at 1-888-508-
4429. USDA cannot provide
legal advice to potential claim-
ants. Persons seeking legal ad-
vice may contact a lawyer or
other legal services provider.
Hispanic and women farmers
can submit discrimination claims
until March 25
Michael Illg of Humboldt works on his opponent during a youth wrestling tour-
nament held at Humboldt High School on Saturday. Humboldt will host the annual
Gotch Youth Wrestling Tournament on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013. See more photos at
www.humboldtnews.com.
The Dakota City Demolition Crew held a “pie in the face” raffle at their last home
bout on Nov. 3. All proceeds went towards purchasing gently used items for the Coats
for Kids program. They also took $1 off of the ticket price at the door if fans brought
a non-perishable food item for the Humboldt County Upper Des Moines Opportu-
nity. Shown with the donated items, from left: Jessica Schade (Havoc), Banzai Buffy
(Steph Tobey) and Jenny Randleman (McNothing). Photo courtesy of Kevin Tobey
Studios.
claims of $103,596.98.
The board recessed as the
board of supervisors and re-
convened as the county board
of canvassers to canvass the
Nov. 6 general election.
While there were some mi-
nor changes to the unofficial
vote totals due to absentee
ballots, no election outcomes
were altered and the changes
were only by a few votes,
County Auditor Peggy Rice
reported after a lengthy can-
vassing process.
Some elected offices were
filled by write-in and a few
of those required a draw of a
name to break a tie. Those all
involved township trustee po-
sitions.
Here are the write-in vote
winners, not reported in last
week’s Humboldt Indepen-
dent.
Lake Township Trustee (2)
Bob Rasmussen 4
Rick Nervig 2•
Wacousta Twp. Trustee (2)
Kelvin Haug 3
Tom Jacobson 2•
Weaver Township Clerk
Andrew Pedersen
Soil and Water Conservation
District Trustee (to fill and
unexpired term)
Ken Day 3
Avery Township Trustee (1)
Bob Dickey 5
Corinth Township Trustee
(1)
Phillip Naeve 2
Humboldt Twp. Trustee (2)
Bruce Foth 2
Jim Halsrud 1
• Tied in votes, won by draw.
Our coverage of local and county
events is so exciting you’ll hardly
be able to wait until the next
issue. When it comes to accurate,
informative news, we’ve got you
covered.
Subscri be today and be i n the know!
515.332.2514
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 9A
By Kent Thompson
The city of Dakota City
agreed to sell off three par-
cels of the vacated 8
th
Street
South, between 2
nd
and 3
rd
Av-
enues South, during its regular
monthly meeting Wednesday,
Nov. 14.
The city received two
sealed bids for the north sec-
tion of the street, 165-feet long
by 80-feet wide.
The bids were from Agnes
Fouarge of Dakota City in the
amount of $753, and from
Kevin Thilges of Dakota City,
in the amount of $1,200. The
DC City Council unanimously
agreed to accept Thilges’ high
bid.
Thilges was the lone bid-
der for the southwest quarter
of 8
th
Street South between 2
nd
and 3
rd
Avenues South. He bid
the previous budget year.
Dakota City sponsored the
“If I Were Mayor…” contest
for fifth graders from the Hum-
boldt and St. Mary’s schools.
There were 100 essays re-
ceived, with the mayor and
council selecting three win-
ners. Students were asked to
write in 150 words or less,
what they would do as mayor.
The entries were judged on
content, style, correct gram-
mar, spelling and punctuation.
The winners received cer-
tificates and Humboldt/Dakota
City Chamber Bucks from the
city’s pop fund (not taxpayer
dollars).
The third place winner
was Claire Varangkounh of
Humboldt. Claire said if she
were mayor, she would put in
more sidewalks, make sure the
streets were not slick and paint
the park equipment.
Joshua Meyer of Humboldt
was the second place winner.
He said if he were mayor he
would try to keep the peace
and keep the town clean and
safe. He said he would get the
support of the community by
listening to everyone’s opin-
ion.
Sierra Boge of Humboldt
was the first place winner. Si-
erra said she would make sure
neighborhoods looked nice,
that streets were repaired and
would do things to make the
community safe.
Dakota City Mayor Don
Faltinson congratulated the
winners and thanked all the
school children for entering.
The council approved a au-
tomatic chlorine scale for the
Dakota City Water Plant from
Hawkins Water Tech of Indi-
ana, at a cost of $6,551.80.
City employee Don Smith
told the council that the Iowa
Department of Natural Re-
sources has recommended an
automated scale for the city
since 2005-06.
“It’s better to do it now
and be proactive before we are
forced to do it,” Faltinson said.
The council also viewed a
PowerPoint presentation from
Curt Wiseman and Bill Goldy,
professional engineers with
the I&S Group in Algona. The
Minnesota-based company
merged with the Kuehl and
Payer civil engineering firm in
Algona earlier this year.
The men said the full-ser-
vice engineering design firm
specializes in right-sized so-
lutions for municipal clients
of all sizes with thoughtful,
long-term planning. The com-
pany has 125 employees in six
offices, including 16 at its Al-
gona office.
The engineers emphasized
work they had done in area
towns like Humboldt, Gilmore
City, Algona and Titonka.
It was reported that the
Dakota City Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant passed its final in-
spection after the completed
work.
The Dakota City Park
campground is now closed for
the season.
Dakota City sponsored a 150-word essay contest for fifth graders in the Humboldt
and St. Mary’s schools recently. The theme of the contest was to answer the question,
“If I Were Mayor I Would…” A total of 100 entries were received and city leaders
had a tough time choosing the winners. The top three students were invited to last
week’s Dakota City Council meeting, where they read their essays. All three winners
received certificates and Chamber Bucks, $15 for third place, $25 for second place
and $50 for first place. The funds used to purchase the Chamber Bucks were from
the city’s pop can money. Pictured from left: third place winner Claire Varangkounh,
Mayor Don Faltinson, second place winner Joshua Meyer and first place winner Si-
erra Boge. Humboldt Independent photo.
$600 for the parcel that is 165-
feet long by 40-feet wide. The
council accepted the bid.
Thilges also bid $600 for
the southeast quarter of the va-
cated street, another 165-feet
by 40-feet parcel.
The council also received a
second bid from Gary Vinsand,
Gilmore City. Vinsand agreed
to trade a parcel of equal size
on the undeveloped 3
rd
Av-
enue South, east of vacated
8
th
Street South and north of
Circle Drive.
After some discussions, the
council unanimously agreed
that the property offered by
Vinsand would be more ben-
eficial for future development
than the cash consideration of-
fered by Thilges. The council
then approved Vinsand’s offer
for the southwest quarter of
the vacated street.
Both Thilges and Vinsand
say they have plans to develop
the properties.
Buyers will be responsible
for all legal and recording fees
and may take possession by
Dec. 1.
The council heard the
2012 financial report for the
year that ended June 30. The
city reported $2,512,281 in
actual expenditures for the
year, due in large part to the
capital project of retrofitting
the city’s wastewater treat-
ment plant. The city reported
$2,582,144 in revenues for
the same 12-month period,
leaving a total of $69,863 in
revenues over expenses. The
city’s ending fund balance on
June 30, 2012, was $687,224,
an increase of $70,000 from
Dakota City Council sells properties
Ventura, Osage, Lake Mills,
Northwood-Kensett and For-
est City.
“Conference superinten-
dents have been in contact
with other schools about the
possibility of joining the
NCC,” Darling said. “But it’s
also very tough because there
aren’t many Class 3A-size
schools close by.”
Tom Simpson, who com-
piles data for the district’s test
scores, updated the board on
the Annual Yearly Report and
the Annual Progress Report.
“The statistics are really
good,” Darling said. “There
are some areas we need to
work on, but there are cer-
tainly areas where we showed
growth.”
“Our MAP test performanc-
es show in Mathematics, for
example, every grade showed
growth and met or exceeded
projections,” Simpson said.
“Part of the AYP and APR
deals with our MAP scores,
not just the Iowa Assess-
ments,” Simpson said.
Darling said expanded read-
ing initiatives at the higher
level and at-risk staffing have
helped improve reading scores.
“We addressed the needs we
felt we had in grades 7-8 by
adding a reading teacher for
those grades,” Darling said.
Darling praised middle
school principal Brenda Geit-
zenauer who recently attended
a national convention where
she gave a presentation on vo-
cabulary and poverty.
Darling reported that he has
been elected to serve on the
Iowa High School Athletic As-
sociation Board of Control.
“It’s quite an honor to be
voted by your peers to serve
on the statewide board,” Dar-
ling said.
Darling also took time out
to thank the community for
making the sports complex en-
trance project a success.
“That gate area project was
probably well over a $140,000
project and we got it com-
pleted for under $80,000. The
volunteer work and labor from
a lot of people really helped
make it happen. I would like
to personally thank everybody
for their donations and hard
work to make the project pos-
sible,” Darling said.
Darling also updated the
board on long-term and short-
term facilities plans. Among
the projects slated for 2012-13
include a new sound system in
the high school auditorium and
locker replacement at the high
school.
Among the projects for
2013-14 include air condition-
ing at Taft and Mease Elemen-
tary schools and improvements
to the bus barn in Dakota City.
“I don’t want to spend down
our SILO (sales tax revenue)
and PPEL levy because you al-
ways want to have something
in place for an emergency, like
if you need a new boiler. We
don’t want to overspend,” Dar-
ling said.
In a report on the district’s
participation in the Iowa Edu-
cational Purchasing foodser-
vice cooperative, Darling said
the district has recognized a
savings of $28,761.37 for the
school year which ended on
June 30, 2012.
The board accepted a bid
from Nolte, Cornman and
Johnson, PC, to handle the
district’s financial auditing for
three years. The district will
pay the firm $9,250 for fis-
cal year 2013, $9,500 for fis-
cal year 2014 and $9,700 for
fiscal year 2015. Cornwell,
Frideres, Maher and Associ-
ates ($11,000-$11,200) and
Hogan-Hansen, PC ($14,000-
$15,500) submitted the other
bids.
After hearing a presentation
from vocal music instructor
Mike Blair and instrumental
music instructor Ben Harper,
the board approved a Jazz
Band/Jazz Choir trip for stu-
dents to attend a clinic in Min-
neapolis on Friday, April 5.
Cost of the trip is $250 for
each student, which will in-
clude a one-night stay, meals
and fees. Students will take
part in a clinic to be held on
the University of Minnesota
campus.
In personnel moves, the
board accepted the hiring of
Monica Adair as one-on-one
middle school teacher associ-
ate for 2012-2013 and Maria
Hadar as pre-kindergarten-12
English Learning Language
teacher associate for 2012-
2013.
The board approved switch-
ing the district’s Internet web
site data base from JMC to
Infinite Campus. Darling said
upgrade attempts with JMC
were not successful. He noted
the new data base should be
more “user-friendly for stu-
dents and parents.
A total of 10 open enroll-
ment requests were approved.
They include Izaka and Daylon
Parker from Fort Dodge due to
change in residence for 2012-
2013, Kadence Johnson from
Fort Dodge for 2012-2013 due
to change in residence, Blaine
Anderson from Fort Dodge
due to change in residence for
2012-2013, Nathanial Hart-
ness from GCB due to change
in residence for 2012-2013,
Mary Rose and Sarah Schmie-
der from Fort Dodge due to
change in residence for 2012-
2013, Allison and Cameron
Hoag from Eagle Grove due to
change in residence for 2012-
2013, Logan Hill from Fort
Dodge due to change in resi-
dence for 2012-2013.
The board also:
–approved the first reading
of policy series 800 items.
–approved the second read-
ing of policy series 700 items.
–approved the third and fi-
nal reading of policy series
503 and 707-711.
–approved an English Lan-
guage Learning contract with
Twin Rivers.
–approved an SBRC appli-
cation for increasing enroll-
ment, open enrollment out and
excel LEP costs.
–approved the district’s
technology plan statements.
School board from front page
Gronewold, Bell, Kyhnn
and Co., CPAs, have released
an audit report on the Hum-
boldt County Memorial Hos-
pital (HCMH).
The auditors reported that
the hospital’s revenues totaled
$13,326,600 for the year end-
ed June 30, 2012, a 3.5 percent
increase from 2011. The rev-
enues included $11,467,800
in net patient revenue,
$1,321,600 in other operating
revenues, $300,200 from the
county, $160,500 in invest-
ment income and $76,500 in
grants and contributions.
Expenses for the year to-
taled $13,002,300, a 7.2 per-
cent increase from the prior
year, and included $2,451,200
for nursing services,
$4,300,600 for other profes-
sional services and $3,020,700
for fiscal and administrative
services.
The increases in revenues
and expenses are due to in-
creased patient services pro-
vided and general inflation
factors.
The report was presented to
the finance committee of the
HCMH Board of Trustees on
Oct. 17. The board discussed
the report in detail and ad-
dressed any recommendations
made by the auditors.
A copy of the audit report
is available in the hospital ad-
ministration office, at the of-
fice of the County Board of
Supervisors and at the office
of the state auditor.
HCMH shows increases in
revenues and expenses
LIVE IOWA. WORK IOWA. BANK IOWA.
Humboldt 515.332.1451 / Drive-up 515.332.1808
Gilmore City 515.373.6244 / bankiowabanks.com
Member FDIC
And always thankful for you!
Thanksgiving is a time to be thankful for many things.
Like doing business with great customers like you.
For our veterans and active duty military personnel.
And for this great country we are privileged to live in.
If you’d like to help support our troops, care package
donations are still being accepted at each of our
area locations.
From all of us at Bank Iowa, Happy Thanksgiving!
ALWAYS
THERE
Tuesday night’s game
Lions make donations
Supervisors accept road bids
No one covers the news
that hits home like your
community newspaper.
We’re your newspaper.
10A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
Joy, Morgan and Jerry Raether visit with Henri Landwirth, the founder of Give
Kids the World a 70-acre hotel and recreational complex, specifically designed for
special needs and terminally ill children. Landwirth said his whole life was a miracle
of survival and success, and h e wants to give something back.
By Kent Thompson
Thanks to an impressive
list of “wish granters,” the Ra-
ether family of Humboldt had
their wishes come true late last
month.
The Rev. Jerry Raether,
pastor at the Zion Lutheran
Church in Humboldt; wife
Barbara, daughter Joy, and
granddaughter Morgan,
haven’t been able to take a
family vacation in what seems
like forever.
“Outside of some short
trips to visit family in Wiscon-
sin, we really haven’t taken a
family vacation,” Rev. Raether
related.
That’s why the Raethers
were very surprised when they
were contacted by the Make A
Wish Foundation.
“Like most people, we
thought Make A Wish was just
for children who were termi-
nally ill. We found out they
also grant wishes to children
who have special needs that
also may be determined to
have threatening medical con-
ditions,” Jerry Raether said.
Morgan, Joy’s daughter, is
13 years old. Shortly after her
birth, Morgan began having
seizures. She was diagnosed
with static encephalopathy and
medically intractable epilepsy.
She underwent a spine fusion
surgery a few years ago that
has helped her sit upright in a
chair.
The condition has left Mor-
gan non-verbal and non-ambu-
latory.
Still, Morgan attends
school and church and enjoys
some of the same things other
children enjoy.
“She absorbs a lot from her
surroundings,” Barb Raether
said. “She really enjoys music
and sounds and sights.”
Morgan was referred to the
Make A Wish Foundation by
Dr. Votta, her pediatrician at
the Trinity Regional Medical
Center in Fort Dodge.
Joy was later contacted and
more information was gath-
ered. Last spring, the Raethers
found out that Morgan’s wish
was granted. Then it was just
a matter of working out the lo-
gistics to take the trip.
While Morgan couldn’t
verbally tell them, the family
thought she would really enjoy
a trip to Disney World in Or-
lando, FL.
The Raethers went to Min-
neapolis on Oct. 21, to start the
trip. They visited the Mall of
America and stayed at Coun-
try Suites Ho-
tel prior to the
three-hour flight
on Oct. 22.
“It was Mor-
gan’s first flight
and she did
pretty well,” her
grandfather said.
All the ar-
rangements were
made by the
Make A Wish
Foundation, and
all the expenses
of the trip were
covered.
The Raeth-
ers also received
some funds for food, souvenirs
and other incidentals.
Upon arriving in Orlando,
the Raethers were taken to a
special 70-acre nonprofit “sto-
rybook” resort called Give
Kids the World Village.
The resort was founded by
Henri Landwirth, a Florida
hotelier, who was a Nazi con-
centration camp survivor as
a child during World War II.
Landwirth immigrated to the
U.S. in 1950 with $20, and
eventually became a franchise
owner of
a Holiday
Inn near the
main gate
to Disney
World.
In 1985,
La ndwi r t h
started his
resort com-
plex to give
a dream to
terminally ill
children. He
contributed
$1 million
of his own
money and
solicited in-
dividual and corporate heroes
to help fund the fun fantasyl-
and.
“It’s a great place and it’s all
children oriented. They serve
ice cream from 7:30 a.m. to 9
p.m., because that’s what kids
like. We ate at gingerbread
house tables and they have a
huge castle where each child
gets their name and the date
they visited put on a star. There
are more than 100,000 stars of
terminally ill or special needs
children in that sky,” the Lu-
theran minister said.
“We got to meet Mayor
Clayton, who was a six-foot
rabbit. He tucked Morgan in
one night. We celebrated Hal-
loween and Christmas there
and Morgan received all kinds
of gifts. She received an 18-
inch Mickey Mouse that she
had signed by Mickey and
Goofy. Every day the good
fairy would come by and give
her something,” Jerry Raether
recounted.
The next five days were a
whirlwind of activity for Mor-
gan and her family.
The Raethers visited the
Disney Animal Kingdom and
got to see a shortened stage
show of the “Lion King.”
“Morgan really came to life
during that show. She enjoyed
the music and flashing lights
and all of the costumes,” her
grandfather said.
On Tuesday, the fam-
ily went to Sea World and got
front row seats for Shamu the
orca show. Morgan, with some
help from grandpa and the
trainer, got to feed and pet the
dolphins.
On Wednesday, the family
Thirteen-year-old Morgan Raether of Humboldt re-
ceived a chance to live out her dreams late last month,
getting to visit Disney World on a vacation arranged by
the Make A Wish Foundation. Here Morgan receives a
hug from Mickey Mouse.
From left: Barb, Joy, Morgan Raether and Pluto with Rev. Jerry Raether at Dis-
ney World. The family received a special trip awarded Morgan by the Make A Wish
Foundation. The Raethers say they have a lot to be thankful for this Thanksgiving
Day. Submitted photos.
Making Morgan's dreams come true
Raether
family
enjoys
vacation
thanks to
Make A
Wish!
went to the Magic Kingdom,
where they got to ride on a
number of different rides and
got a chance to interact with
a number of different Disney
and other life-size creations of
famous cartoon characters.
“It was a tiring day with
lots of people, but Morgan
liked the riverboat ride and had
a good time.”
On Thursday, the family
stayed at the Give Kids the
World V illage. Where Jerry
and Morgan played putt-putt
golf among dinosaurs!
On Friday, the family vis-
ited Epcot Center. While it
was more geared toward adults
than kids, Morgan enjoyed the
parade of nations and a Mexi-
co pavilion display with lots of
music and lights. She also rode
on a Nemo ride there that her
mom said she liked, Jerry Ra-
ether said.
Morgan got a chance to
meet all of the Disney charac-
ters. She especially like meet-
ing Ariel, The Little Mermaid,
because they both have red
hair, Jerry said.
On Saturday the family
headed home, tired, but full of
wonderful memories.
Joy Raether said she had
never seen Morgan so happy as
when she was taking in some
of the sights and sounds of the
trip.
The Rev. Raether said his
family is so very blessed and
especially thankful to have
been given this opportunity to
enjoy a family vacation with
Morgan in a place designed to
make dreams come true.
“We are thankful for the
Humboldt community and all
they have done for our family.
We are thankful for the special
education Morgan receives.
Mr. Bruder, Mr. Darling, her
teachers and the other students
all look out for Morgan, and
we can’t say enough about
what the school system pro-
vides.
“We are thankful for Mor-
gan’s doctors in Fort Dodge
and Iowa City, and the special
medical care she receives.
“We are so very thankful
for the Make A Wish Founda-
tion and for Mr. Landwirth,
whom we met and talked with,
and his Give Kids the World
resort, not just what they did
for Morgan, but what they do
for all kids,” Rev. Raether said.
They give them happiness
and hope, even if for a brief
time.
“They tell a story at Give
Kids the World about a young
girl with leukemia who vis-
ited the ice cream palace and
vowed she would come back.
No one expected her to, as she
was terminally ill, but nine
years later she returned. Mir-
acles do take place,” the local
minister said.
“Going on that trip gives
special meaning to the holi-
days this year. We have learned
what truly is important, the gift
of family and friends and the
opportunity to serve others.
We have a truly gracious God,
and for those things, we can all
be thankful.”
The Humboldt Dramatic Arts Guild in
cooperation with the Humboldt Area Arts
Community has announced plans for another
dinner theater presentation in February.
The annual murder mystery/comedy will
be “The Butler Did It,” a send up on British
detective and murder mysteries. It is one of
those plays within a play that will challenge
the audience to follow what is real and what
is make-believe.
The director for the production will be
longtime Dramatic Arts Guild perfomer
Dave Cook of Fort Dodge. Dave has por-
trayed some of the zanier characters in a
number of local productions and has also had
stage experience in drama and musicals.
Dave will be conducting open tryouts on
the evenings of Monday, Dec. 3, and Tues-
day, Dec. 4, 7 p.m. each evening at the Art
Center, 906 Sumner Ave. Anyone interested
is invited to participate. The cast calls for
five female characters, five males and two
minor walk-on parts.
No special talents are required. Novice
and veteran actors are welcome.
Anyone interested in helping with the
technical aspects of the production, as well
as the areas of costumes, properties and pub-
licity, are also welcome to attend.
The tentative production dates for the
dinner theater are Feb. 8-9, with a possible
third performance to be added.
Play tryouts are Dec. 3-4
While breaks from school
should be fun, they don’t have
to be breaks from learning.
The down time of the holi-
day season is the perfect time
of year to keep children enter-
tained with books.
And with recent adoption
of the Common Core State
Standards, which set expecta-
tions for what students should
be learning so they will be col-
lege and career ready, children
of all ages will be expected to
read more non-fiction.
“As a parent, you can play
an important role in helping
your children meet the Com-
mon Core State Standards
while on break,” says Donna
Elder, senior literacy special-
ist for the National Center for
Family Literacy (NCFL). “By
using fiction and their interests
as a springboard for informa-
tional reading, you can make
this a fun experience.”
Elder is providing reading
ideas to feed your children’s
interests.
It’s all about offering them
books on subjects in which
you already know they are in-
terested:
• For example, if your child
enjoyed “The Cricket in Times
Square,” by George Selden,
you can help foster his or her
interest in crickets with “In-
sectiopedia,” by Douglas Flo-
rian, “Chirping Crickets,” by
Melvin Berger, or “Crickets,”
by Cheryl Coughlan.
• After reading “The Snow
Child: A Russian Folktale”
retold by Freya Littledale, fol-
low up by encouraging your
child to read about the science
of weather with “The Kids’
Book of Weather Forecasting”
by Mark Breen and Kathleen
Friestad or “Weather” by Sey-
mour Simon.
• Teens who couldn’t put
down “The Hunger Games,”
by Suzanne Collins may be in-
terested in learning more about
the origins and history of real
athletic competitions. Start
with “The Olympics: A His-
tory of the Modern Games” by
Allen Guttmann.” Or entertain
a newfound interest in the out-
doors with “The Ultimate Sur-
vival Manual,” by Rich John-
son or a field guide to birds.
• Together, visit the non-
profit website www.Wondero-
polis.org, voted one of TIME
magazine’s 50 Top Websites of
2011. Wonderopolis is an ef-
fective way to teach nonfiction
reading, which the Common
Core State Standards identify
as a critical skill. The site’s
feature, “Wonder of the Day,”
is aligned with these stan-
dards, examining a new topic
daily.
• Is your child interested
in baseball? From historical
accounts like “Baseball: A
History of America’s Favor-
ite Game” by George Vecsey
to a book that explains how
bats are made, such as “Good
Wood: The Story of the Base-
ball Bat,” by Stuart Miller, you
can help kids score an academ-
ic homerun.
• Inspire the inner-chef in
your children and test their
ability to follow instruc-
tions with “Kids’ Fun and
Healthy Cookbook,” by Nicola
Graimes. Or opt for a picture-
book biography like, “Bon Ap-
petit! The Delicious Life of Ju-
lia Child” by Jessie Hartland.
Don’t let “educational” and
“boring” mean the same thing
in your household.
By seeking out reading
material that engages your
children on their level on
subjects that are meaningful
to them, you can help them
meet the Common Core State
Standards, while having a very
merry holiday season.
Great ways to keep your children
reading over the holidays
You can bet that during the
holiday season your pet is bound
to sniff out leftovers, dig into the
presents and have fun with all of
your decorations. And while these
holiday effects can spread cheer
and joy amongst your human fam-
ily members, they can be a real
hazard to pets. This season, keep
your holiday celebration safe,
happy and healthy for pets by tak-
ing these key measures:
Decorate wisely
Avoid poisonous holiday
plants like poinsettias and holly.
There are plenty of toxic-free al-
ternatives as evocative of the sea-
son as these traditional holiday fa-
vorites. If you must deck the halls
with such plants, place them in an
out of the way spot your pets can’t
reach and keep your pets away
from those areas of your home.
Tinsel and gift ribbons are
tempting for pets that like to play
with shiny things, but when swal-
lowed, such items can cause intes-
tinal obstructions. Clean up after
opening presents and vacuum
around the tree to pick up any gift
debris, as well as fallen pine nee-
dles, which pose a similar hazard.
Avoid the problem
When it comes to the holidays,
there’s no need to be a Grinch in
order to keep your celebration
safe for pets. New technologies
are making it easier to teach pets
to stay away from certain areas of
your home, both indoors and out-
side.
Watch your plate
As most great pet owners
know, not all human foods are
safe or healthy for pets. Pets can
choke on bones in meat or fish
dishes. And such foods as onions,
macadamia nuts and chocolate,
which are commonly found in
holiday cooking and baking, are
unsafe for dogs. Avoid having
your well-meaning guests sending
Spot to the vet by laying ground
rules about sharing food.
Also, one man’s trash is a pet’s
treasure, so be sure to keep the lid
on the garbage secure. By taking
proper precautions, you can keep
the holidays festive this year for
both you and your pets.
Protect your pets from holiday hazards
Great food is the centerpiece
of any holiday celebration, and
practicing safe food handling in
the kitchen is an important part of
holiday meal preparation. There
are certain steps you can take to
keep friends and family safe from
food poisoning.
“The kitchen can be chaotic
and it can be challenging to keep
food safety top of mind when
dealing with a whole holiday
meal, from turkey to trimmings,”
cautions Shelley Feist, Executive
Director of the non-profit Partner-
ship for Food Safety Education.
According to the U.S. Centers
for Disease Control and Preven-
tion, one in six Americans will get
sick from dangerous foodborne
bacteria this year. But these cru-
cial safety tips can help you create
a safe and tasty holiday celebra-
tion:
Clean
Prevent the spread of bacteria
by keeping a clean kitchen and
washing hands.
Cutting boards, dishes, uten-
sils and countertops should be
washed with hot water and soap
after preparing each food item,
and before going on to the next.
Keep plenty of clean cloth towels
or paper towels handy for clean-
ing surfaces and drying hands.
Enforce a strict hand wash-
ing policy for all holiday kitchen
helpers. Use warm water and soap
for 20 seconds before and after
handling food.
Rinse fresh fruits and veg-
etables under running tap water
just before eating or preparing.
Rub firm-skinned produce under
running tap water or scrub with a
clean vegetable brush while rins-
ing with running tap water.
Separate
Cross-contamination is how
bacteria spread. Keep raw meat,
poultry, seafood and eggs and
their juices away from ready-to-
eat foods, like salad ingredients.
Using separate cutting boards is
one way to reduce opportunities
for cross-contamination.
Cook
Temperature matters! Bacteria
can survive if foods aren’t cooked
to a safe internal temperature.
Even an experienced cook can’t
tell if food is cooked safely by
how it looks, so use a food ther-
mometer to ensure you’re cook-
ing turkeys, ham, egg dishes and
other foods to a safe internal tem-
perature. Download a temperature
chart at www.holidayfoodsafety.
org.
Chill
The holiday celebration is
great and even better if you have
delicious leftovers. Just remember
to enjoy them within four days.
Bacteria spread fastest at tem-
peratures between 40 and 140
degrees Fahrenheit, so chill food
promptly, within two hours, at
a refrigerator temperature of 40
degrees or below. Appliance ther-
mometers are inexpensive and can
help you monitor your refrigera-
tor’s temperature.
Bring on the bird
Learning how to cook a tur-
key safely may be one of the
biggest holiday meal challenges.
Never thaw your turkey on the
counter. Turkeys are best thawed
in the fridge. So allot plenty of
real estate to your turkey before
your celebration. If you’re going
to stuff your turkey, stuff safely.
Cook stuffing to a minimum tem-
perature of 165 degrees, whether
inside or outside of the bird. Visit
www.Holidayfoodsafety.org for a
complete guide to the safe han-
dling, preparation, serving, and
leftover storage of your holiday
turkey. You’ll also find guidelines
on turkey size, how to thaw a tur-
key and cooking times.
By taking precautions to pre-
pare food safely, you can ensure
that bacteria won’t be guests at
your holiday celebration.
Holiday food safety tips
Obituaries
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 11A
NOTICE WANTED
DOROTHY E. NELSON
1923-2012
Funeral services for Doro-
thy E. Nelson, 89, Humboldt,
were held Monday, Nov. 19,
at Our Saviour’s Lutheran
Church, Humboldt. Burial was
in the Callender Cemetery at
Callender. She died Friday,
Nov. 16, 2012, at the Hum-
boldt County Memorial Hos-
pital.
The Mason-Lindhart Funer-
al Home of Humboldt was in
charge of arrangements.
Dorothy is survived by her
brothers, Erland (Phyllis) Nel-
son of Humboldt, and Virgil
(Barbara) Nelson of Dakota
City; sisters, Phyllis (Carroll)
Vik of Lamoni, and Selma Eh-
rhardt of Humboldt; and sev-
eral nieces and nephews. She
was preceded in death by her
parents; brothers, Clifford and
Frank Nelson; niece, Noelle
Nelson; and nephew, Ronald
Ehrhardt.
Dorothy Esther Nelson,
daughter of Phillip and Flor-
ence (Swanson) Nelson, was
born Jan. 26, 1923, at Fort
Dodge. She was raised at Fort
Dodge and in 1940, the fam-
ily moved briefly to Moore-
land. In 1942, they moved
to their farm near Callender
where Dorothy enjoyed car-
ing for the barnyard animals
and worked in area homes
caring for children. In 1951,
following the death of her fa-
ther, Dorothy moved with her
mother and siblings to Hum-
boldt. For a time, Dorothy was
employed by the Wakonsa Ho-
tel in Fort Dodge and in later
years helped care for her aging
mother.
Dorothy was a member
of Our Saviour’s Lutheran
Church. She enjoyed flower
gardening, jigsaw puzzles, and
reading. She and her mother
were avid seamstresses, craft-
ing dresses for each other,
quilts, and aprons as well as
crocheting.
FREE TRAINING! Health-
care, Construction and Col-
lege Credit Training Programs.
Young Women and Men, Ages
16-24. Job Placement Assis-
tance, Free Room and Board.
Call Today! 515-281-9685. re-
cruiting.jobcorps.gov. (INCN)
FOODLINER, INC. Regional
Drivers Wanted. Earning Po-
tential is Unlimited. We are
expanding our operations in
IOWA. We offer a generous
pay package, a great benefit
package, regular home time,
weekly paychecks, and elec-
tronic logs. Requirements:
Class A-CDL, 2 years driv-
ing experience, a good MVR.
Apply at www.foodliner.com.
(INCN)
TANTARA TRANSPORTA-
TION is now hiring OTR
Company Flatbed Drivers and
Owner Operators. Competi-
tive Pay and Home Time. Call
Dave at 800-650-0292 or ap-
ply online at www.tantara.us.
(INCN)
DRIVER - $0.01 increase per
mile after 6 months and 12
months. Choose your home-
time. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus.
Requires 3 months recent ex-
perience. 800-414-9569. www.
driveknight.com. (INCN)
OWNER OPERATORS
NEEDED Refrigerated Di-
vision, join our experienced
team of seasoned profession-
als. Terminals in KS, SD, TN,
NM. 2 years OTR experience.
Call 800-796-8200 x103.
(INCN)
“YOU GOT THE DRIVE, We
have the Direction” OTR Driv-
ers APU Equipped Pre-Pass
EZ-pass passenger policy.
Newer equipment. 100 percent
NO touch. 1-800-528-7825.
(INCN)
Drivers: OTR DRIVERS Sign
On Bonus $1,000 - $1,200 Up
to 45 CPM Full-time Positions
with Benefits! Pet Policy O/Os
Welcome! deBoer Transporta-
tion, 800-825-8511. www.de-
boertrans.com. (INCN)
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for hands on Aviation
Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if quali-
fied- Job placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance, 1-866-783-
0458. (INCN)
THIS CLASSIFIED SPOT for
sale. Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 250
Iowa newspapers! Only $300/
week. Call this paper or 800-
227-7636 www.cnaads.com.
(INCN)
RITCHIE BROS. UNRE-
SERVED AGRICULTURAL
EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS
Kansas City (Dec. 7), Chicago
(Dec. 12), Minneapolis (Dec.
14), St Louis (Dec. 20). Fea-
turing a large selection of late
model farm equipment. In-
spect in person or online. Call
855-331-5732 or visit rbauc-
tion.com. (INCN)
Jeff Plagge, President and
CEO of Northwest Financial
Corp. in Arnolds Park, has
become chairman-elect on the
ABA Board for 2012-2013
after serving a year as vice
chairman. New officers and
directors were elected to serve
on the American Bankers As-
sociation’s (ABA) board for
2012-2013 during the ABA’s
annual convention in San Di-
ego, Oct. 14-16.
The American Bankers As-
sociation represents banks of
all sizes and charters and is
a respected voice for the na-
tion’s $13 trillion banking
industry and its two million
employees. ABA’s extensive
legislative, legal, regulatory,
conference and educational
resources enhance the suc-
cess of the nation’s banks that
strengthen America’s econo-
my and communities.
Jeff Plagge is President and
CEO of Northwest Financial
Corp., and is responsible for
leading three bank charters
within the Northwest Finan-
cial Corp. organization. This
includes Northwest Bank of
Spencer, First National Bank
of Sioux Center, and First
National Bank in Creston.
The three banks collectively
hold $1.5 billion in assets and
have 30 offices throughout
Iowa and eastern Nebraska.
Other entities within North-
west Financial Corp. include
Northwest Wealth Manage-
ment, LLC and Northwest
Commercial Credit Corpora-
tion.
“Banks come in all types
and sizes and ABA is the fo-
rum where the entire industry
Jeff Plagge elected to ABA Board
PREGNANT? Considering
Adoption? Call us First! Liv-
ing expenses, housing, medi-
cal and continued support
afterwards. Choose adoptive
family of your choice. Call
24/7. Adopt Connect. 1-866-
743-9212. (INCN)
Classifieds
comes together to create so-
lutions that will benefit ev-
eryone,” said Plagge. “I look
forward to representing the
entire banking industry in this
national leadership position.
All of us in the banking in-
dustry understand our unique
position to assist and guide
consumers, small business
owners, farmers and ranchers
and commercial businesses to
a more vibrant and successful
economy.”
Plagge has been very active
in volunteer activities at the
community, state and national
levels. He currently serves
on the Board of Directors for
Delta Dental of Iowa Board
and Shazam, Inc. He is also a
member of the Chicago Fed-
eral Reserve Bank Community
Deposit Institution Advisory
Council and the Wartburg Col-
lege President’s Advisory
Board. Plagge previously
served on a number of ABA
committees and task forces,
including the ABA Board of
Directors and as Chairman of
the ABA Government Rela-
tions Council and the ABA
Agricultural Committee. He is
a former board member of the
Federal Reserve Bank of Chi-
cago and the former chairman
of the Iowa Bankers Associa-
tion.
Private pesticide applicator
re-certification training will
be held Monday, Dec. 10, at 7
p.m., at Zion Lutheran Church
in Humboldt.
Registration will begin at
6:15 p.m., and participants
must be registered prior to 7
p.m. Annual training is re-
private pesticide applicator re-
certification training payable
to Humboldt County ISU Ex-
tension at the time of registra-
tion.
Pre-registration is not re-
quired. For more information,
contact Kim Vitzthum at 515-
332-2201.
quired for private pesticide ap-
plicators wanting to re-certify
to apply restricted use pesti-
cides.
Certified applicators that
do not attend annual training
will have to take an exam to
re-certify. There is a $20 state-
wide training fee for attending
Private Pesticide Applicator
Recertification Training Dec. 10
Humboldt Community
Schools
Week of Nov. 26-30
Monday, Nov. 26
Breakfast: Pancake sau-
sage on stick, syrup, juice,
milk.
Lunch: Chicken strips,
mashed potatoes, broccoli,
wheat dinner roll, margarine,
peaches, milk.
Tuesday, Nov. 27
Hot Lunch
Breakfast: Breakfast wrap,
cereal, juice, milk.
Lunch: Pork tenderloin on
whole grain bun, French fries,
corn, pears, milk.
Wednesday, Nov. 28
Breakfast: Breakfast pizza,
cereal, juice, milk.
Lunch: Breaded chicken
patty on whole grain bun, ro-
maine lettuce, dressing, baby
carrots, bananas, milk.
Thursday, Nov. 29
Breakfast: Cereal, muffin,
juice, milk.
Lunch: Whole grain pizza,
carrot coins, cherry tomatoes,
mandarin oranges, chocolate
chip cookie, milk.
Friday, Nov. 30
Breakfast: Cereal, apple
frudel, juice, milk.
Lunch: Taco, lettuce, to-
mato, shredded cheese, refried
beans, peaches, milk.
Miranda Pederson, 12
th
grade, was left off the Humboldt
High School A Honor Roll for the first quarter. Humboldt High
School regrets the error.
Correction to Humboldt
High School Honor Roll
JOHN DEERE TOYS
NEW!
2013 Models In Stock!
K.C. NIELSEN, LTD.
HWY. 3 EAST • HUMBOLDT, IA
515-332-2545
K.C. NIELSEN, LTD.
Hwy. 3 E. Humboldt
515-332-2545
Toll Free 1-800-332-2545
Snowblower
• Replace spark plug
• Change fuel filter
• Change engine oil
• Check all belts and drives
Call Dan and Sign Up Today!
• Check gear case
• Lubricate entire machine
• Check shear bolts
• Level blower
Tune-up
Special
A.I. PROCESSORS is currently interested in hiring for the following position.
Full-time Production Workers: New starting wage of $13.00 with 50¢
increase after ninety days. We offer 75¢ shift differential with three and
four day weekends. Overtime as needed.
Benefits include eight paid holidays, medical and dental insurance,
sick and personal days, short and long term disability, and 401K. Pre-
employment drug screening required.
Apply in person at A.I. Processors in Whittemore, Iowa.
Hagie Manufacturing Company
721 Central Ave. West • Clarion, Iowa 50525
Email: csherwood@hagie.com
What we are thankful for at Hagie; a company that cares,
a challenging job, advancement opportunities, a plethora
of benefits, and most of all…the best employees ever! Are
you thankful for what you have today? If not, it’s time to
check us out.
Current Openings:
2nd Shift Welders / 1st and 2nd Shift Painters
2nd Shift Manufacturing Dept. Manager
Web & Application Developer
Service Department Manager
Engineering Positions
Check out the 11th ranked Top Workplace in Iowa for 2012 at
www.hagiecareers.com or call 515-532-2861 TODAY.
Help Wanted
Opening at a Finisher near You!
Team Atmosphere
Regular Hours
Advancement Possibilities
Full Benefit Package
Full-time
For information:
712-852-8550
jobs@kerbermilling.com
www.kerbercompanies.com
EEO-Pre-employment drug screen required
Very Unique Local Opportunity
Well established Forest Products Trading Corp is
expanding our 20 person trading team.
• No Travel
• No Investment
• Profit Split
• Income potential $150,000 & up
To discuss call or send resume to JB 515-332-1037.
Forest Specialties, LLC, P.O. Box 527, Humboldt, IA 50548
Part-time includes every other weekend
and some holidays. 6:30-11:45 A.M.
Pick up application or call & ask for Linda.
Humboldt Care Center North
1111 11th Ave. N. • Humboldt • 515-332-2623 EOE
Abens-Marty-Curran Insurance Agency has
an opening for a full-time customer service
representative.
Competitive wages, plus benefits.
Send resumé to P.O. Box 85, Humboldt, IA 50548.
HELP WANTED
Humboldt Red Power is seeking full-time, experienced
service technicians. We offer competitive wages and a full
benefit package. If you would like to become part of the
Red Power Team - stop out and pick up an application at
Humboldt Red Power
Hwy. 169 North, Humboldt
or email Rob Hinton: robh@redpowerteam.com
Aventure Staffi ng has immediate posions
available for forkli and general labor in
Renwick, IA. Must be able to work rotang
shis. Compeve pay and benefits
available. To apply, please visit www.
aventure.com and choose the Spencer branch
opon. Quesons can be answered at 800-
517-2536. Pre-employme nt background
check and drug screen may be required. EOE
CARRIER ROUTE PRSRT STD US POSTAGE
PAID HUMBOLDT, IA 50548 PERMIT NO. 29
YOUR NUMBER ONE ADVERTISING SOURCE SINCE 1931
POSTAL CUSTOMER
Volume 79 - 46 Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Phone: 515.332.3425 James Gargano, Publisher
Ph. 332-1498 • Open 6 am-11 pm 7 days a week (Pharmacy 332-5082) • Hrs: M-F 8:30 am-7:30 PM; Sat. 9 am-5 pm; Sun. 10 am-5 pm
Prices Good Oct. 31-Nov. 6
For your convenience, we accept Bank Cards...Mastercard, Visa and Discover, and Humboldt Chamber Bucks • We reserve the right to limit quantities.
SIGN UP TODAY! SEE STORE FOR DETAILS!
FAMILY FEAST
TURKEY DINNER $
109.95
Serves up to 12, only $9.16 per person.
Choose six family-size side dishes or pies.
Family-size side dishes serve 8 to 12.
BONELESS TURKEY
BREAST DINNER
$
39.95
Serves up to 4, only $11.24 per person.
Choose three dinner-sized side dishes or 1/2 pie.
Dinner-size side dishes serve 3 to 4.
STEAMSHIP ROUND
HAM DINNER
$
109.95
Serves up to 12, only $9.16 per person.
Choose six family-size side dishes or pies.
Family-size side dishes serve 8 to 12.
TRADITIONAL BONELESS
HAM DINNER
$
69.95
Serves up to 8, only $8.74 per person.
Choose three family-size side dishes or pies.
Family-size side dishes serve 8 to 12.
Allow up to three hours of reheating time.
G
ive y
ou
rse
lf th
e g
ift of ti m
e. Place your order online, by phone or in person
T R A D I T I O N A L
Tu
rk
e
y D
i n
n
e
r
$
69.95 Serves 8, only $8.74 per person. Choose three family-size dishes or pies.
Allow up to three hours of reheating time. Family-size side dishes serve 8 to 12.
heat &serve
HUMBOLDT
Have A Safe
& Happy
Halloween!
From all of us at the HUMBOLDT REMINDER
2011
Humboldt County, Iowa
Thursday, November 1, 2012
$1.25
Area churches ....................6B
Classifi ed
advertising .................. 10A
Community calendar ........6B
Courthouse news .............. 4A
Obituaries ............................ 9A
Sports ...................................1B
2 Sections
Offi cial newspaper of Humboldt County
Vol. 154 No. 24 USPS No. 254060
HHS to present South Pacifi c
Humboldt High School Drama and Music departments will present “South Pacifi c” Nov. 1, 2 and 3 in the R.W. Carlson
auditorium. Among the students involved in one of the scenes above, from left: Jacob Helvick, Katie Currier, Holly Kirch-
hoff and Jenifer Bentz. Tickets for the show are $6 adults and $3 students, available in the high school offi ce. The curtain
will rise at 7:30 each evening. See the special section on the musical inside this issue. Humboldt Independent photo. To
view or purchase additional photos, visit the Independent online at www.humboldtnews.com.
Humboldt Community School District Superintendent Greg Darling (right) presented
the Iowa High School Athletic Association State playoff participation trophy to senior class
football players after Humboldt’s 21-12 loss to South Tama Monday night in the second
round of the playoffs at Mason Maach Field in Humboldt. Humboldt Independent photo.
HHS m
usical sets sail this w
eek
The Humboldt High
School Drama and Music
Departments proudly pres-
ent the Rodgers and Ham-
merstein Broadway musical
“South Pacifi c” this Thurs-
day, Friday and Saturday,
Nov. 1, 2, and 3, in the R.
W. Carlson auditorium.
“South Pacifi c” is a Rodgers
and Hammerstein classic,
which won a Pulitzer Prize
for Best Drama, as well as
10 Tonys when it debuted in
1949. Despite the passage of
60-plus years, it retains its
signifi cance today, address-
ing themes of race, bigotry
and identity. Along with the
serious themes, many light-
hearted moments fi ll the
stage.
The Humboldt cast is led
by Jen Bentz as the hopeless-
ly romantic Nellie Forbush,
and Jake Helvick as French
planter Emile De Beque
singing the Richard Rodgers
classics “I’m Gonna Wash
That Man Right Outta My
Hair,” and “Some Enchanted
Evening.” James Sobkoweak
plays Lt. Joe Cable who falls
in love with islander, Liat
(Andra Niles), and delivers
the central message of the
show in “You’ve Got To Be
Carefully Taught.” Miranda
Pederson adds comic relief
with the character Bloody
Mary who tries to sell sou-
venirs to the sailors as well
as pair her daughter with
“saxy” Lt. Cable.
Most fun of all is watch-
ing the ensemble of sail-
ors and nurses, led by Sam
George as Luther Billis,
head of the base’s laundry
operation. Sam leads the
talented sailors in a rousing
version of “There Is Nothin’
Like A Dame,” and wiggles
around in a grass skirt and
coconut bra during “Honey
Bun.” The nurses are very
busy keeping track of Nel-
ly’s emotions in “I’m Gonna
Wash,” and “I’m In Love
With A Wonderful Guy.”
They also put on an unfor-
gettable “Thanksgiving Fol-
lies” show for the sailors of
the base.
Tickets for the show are
$6 adults and $3 students,
and are available in the high
school offi ce. The curtain
will rise at 7:30 each eve-
ning. Don’t miss this grand
musical performance.
Supervisors
approve funds
for Ottosen
By Kent Thompson
Worried about setting
a precedent, the Humboldt
County Board of Supervisors
begrudgingly approved a pay-
ment of $1,000 to the city of
Ottosen for street repair on
Monday.
The payment are funds the
city contends is owed them,
because it believes the work
should have been done by the
county in the fi rst place.
Ottosen Mayor Richard
Kinseth and Council member
Jason Fowler were at Mon-
day’s meeting, and explained
an issue with the intersection
with County Road C-20, the
main east/west thoroughfare
through town, and 2nd Street.
The city said there was 10
feet of the approach from 2nd
Street to C-20 that was not fi n-
ished, leaving a large drop off.
According to county re-
cords, C-20 was resurfaced
through Ottosen in 2004. The
work included milling off four
inches of surface, replacing
with a four-inch cold and place
and three-inch asphalt overlay.
Kinseth said County Engi-
neer Paul Jacobson told them
that the approach was not
fi nished because 2nd Street
was not up to grade. Kinseth
explained that the town coun-
cil had received several com-
plaints from citizens about
the road and contracted with
Blacktop Service Company of
Humboldt to make the street
repairs and lay 10 feet of as-
phalt to connect C-20 and 2nd
Street. In a letter to the super-
visors, the council asked for
$1,200 to pay for the repairs
for road work that was com-
pleted that it believed should
have been the county’s respon-
sibility.
“Even in towns under 500
population, we (the county)
run the paving through the
town corporate limits with a
20-22-feet overlay with a fi ve
foot fi ll on the side streets
and alleys,” Jacobson told the
board.
Jacobson said the issue is
not unique to Ottosen, as there
are a number of city streets in
smaller towns that are not up
to grade. “Look at K Road in
Livermore. Thor also had an
See Supervisors,
Planting a new
seed: H
um
boldt business expands
There’s a new building
rapidly going up on High-
way 3 East.
It’s TRI County Agron-
omy, a Pioneer seed dealer-
ship owned by Joe Olson
and Dan Thompson. They
are constructing a 180’ by
60’ building, along with a
42’ by 36’ offi ce area on the
south side of Highway 3 just
between John Deere and
John’s Ag Service.
The new building will
allow them to hold all their
seed and crop protection
products before spring. With
18’ high sidewalls, they’ll
be able to stack the Pioneer
Pro Boxes three high in the
warehouse.
“It was an opportunity
to increase our capacity and
take delivery of all our ship-
ments whenever they are
ready. Ultimately it makes
us a more reliable supplier
for our customers,” Olson
said.
With the purchase of the
lot, dirt work started in Au-
gust. They hope to fully be
in the new building by mid-
November and are planning
an Open House in Decem-
ber.
Both Olson and Thomp-
son agree this is an excit-
ing opportunity for them to
increase their services and
Pioneer footprint in the area.
Plans call for the instal-
lation of fi ve bulk soybean
Dan Thompson (left) and Joe Olson stand in front of the new location of TRI County Agronomy, located on High-
way 3 East, next door to John’s Ag Service/John’s NAPA and John Deere. Construction is going at a rapid pace
and they hope to be operating out of the new location by the middle of November. Submitted photo.
Lighted parade
entries wanted
The 2012 Lighted Christ-
mas Parade is fast approach-
ing. Entries are now being ac-
cepted.
The Humboldt Lighted
Christmas Parade will be on
Saturday, Nov. 17, at 5 p.m.
The parade route will begin
by Northwest Bank, continu-
ing through Sumner Avenue
into Dakota City, Main Street.
It will end at the VFW in Da-
kota City. A free will chili sup-
per with Santa will conclude
the evening.
Registration deadline is
Wednesday, Nov. 14. For
entries, e-mail chamber@
hdcchamber.com or call
515-332-5447. Please provide
phone number and e-mail ad-
dress with registration.
Burn days Nov. 3
and 17 in Humboldt
The city of Humboldt will
allow open burning of yard
waste on Saturday, Nov. 3 and
17, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. No
burning is allowed on the city
right of way. All fi res must be
attended.
Remember
to vote
The 2012 general elec-
tion will be Tuesday, Nov.
6, with voting from 7 a.m.
to 9 p.m. at selected loca-
tions around the county.
Look inside today’s issue
for a more detailed report
on seats up for election
and polling locations in the
county.
A reminder that The
Humboldt County Audi-
tor’s Offi ce will be open
this Saturday, Nov. 3, from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for the pur-
poses of early absentee vot-
ing. Absentee voting will
be allowed at the Auditor’s
Offi ce on Monday, Nov. 5,
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The last day to request
an absentee ballot is Friday,
Nov. 2, at 5 p.m. All mailed
ballots must be postmarked
by Monday, Nov. 5. Ab-
sentee ballots may be hand
delivered to the Auditor’s
Offi ce until the close of
voting, 9 p.m. on Tuesday,
Nov. 6.
People with questions
about voting may contact
the Humboldt County Au-
ditor’s Offi ce at 332-1571.
Art Preview
Local artists of all ages
have been exploring the
textures in a variety of art
forms including multimedia,
sculpture, painting, as well
as textiles. The HAAC board
is excited to open this year’s
art preview of the “Feel of
Art” with an artist reception
tonight (Thursday) from 5-8
p.m., in the Humboldt Art
Center at 906 Sumner Ave
in Humboldt.
Please join in celebrat-
ing the artists’ talents, visit
See Art Preview,
Humboldt County REC
earns million hour award
By Kent Thompson
In 1980, Ronald Reagan was energizing the electorate, Ab-
scam was uncovering public bribery, Pac-Man was gobbling
dots and ghosts and former Beatle John Lennon was assassi-
nated.
It was also the year that Humboldt County REC began a
streak that few organizations can equal, that is still going strong,
more than 32 years since it began.
On April 10, 1980, Humboldt County REC began day one of
not having a lost time accident.
Now, over one million employee work hours later, the elec-
tric cooperative celebrated with a recognition dinner Oct. 23,
honoring present and past employees for their accomplish-
ments.
The streak has enduring during the tenure of three general
managers, several board presidents and numerous employee
safety directors.
Henry Lenning was the general manager in 1980, succeeded
by Dennis Fuller in 1984, and Steve Long in 2000. Long’s ten-
ure will be coming to a close at the end of this year, as Hum-
boldt County Rural Electric Cooperative will cease operations
after 76 years, merging with Midland Power Cooperative of Jef-
ferson.
Through it all, one constant has been an emphasis on safety,
REC present and past offi cials, said at the celebration.
Long said the cooperative has built a culture of safety over
the years.
“The key elements are supervision, education and training,
along with work rules and proper equipment,” the general man-
ager said.
“A lot of what we do today was started back in 1980. We’re
still concerned about reliability, quality of service, commitment
to the members and commitment to safety.
“This cooperative has always had the attitude that safety is
everyone’s business and everyone has taken on that responsibil-
ity,” Long said.
Safety milestone is rare accomplishment
See REC Award,
See TRI County,
H
u
g
h
e
s
R
a
c
in
g
R
e
c
o
lle
c
t
io
n
s
A
L
P
H
A
s
c
h
o
o
l
S
ip
&
T
e
ll... H
A
A
C
G
o
u
r
m
e
t
D
i
n
n
e
r
Volum
e 3 • • Issue 11 • • Novem
ber 2012
See the ALL NEW
humboldtnews website
at www.humboldtnews.com
where you can:
• Subscribe to the print or e-edition
of the Humboldt Independent (print
subscribers automatically qualify
for the e-edition)
• Subscribe to the online edition
of Humboldt Now for as low as
$1 per month
• View the Humboldt Reminder
online for free
• See all of the photos taken by
the talented staff
• See the latest in breaking
news from the Humboldt
County area
• See special issues
To fi nd out more visit
www.humboldtnews.com
12A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 13A
MORE S
e
le
c
tio
n
!
2011 Chevy
Silverado Crew
$
30,650
4X4, Z71, Power Seat, CD, 1 Owner
2010 Ford
Edge SEL
$
23,980
AWD, Power Seat, 24,000 Miles
#23708A #24036A
2008 Toyota
Highlander LTD
$
26,950
1 Owner, AWD, Leather, Moonroof
#23943A
2007 GMC
Acadia SLE 1
$
19,755
FWD, DVD, Moonroof, Leather
#24138A
2007 Toyota
4RUNNER SR5
$
15,448
V6, 4X4, PW, PL, CD
#33045B
2007 Ford
Edge SEL
$
14,975
FWD, Power Seat
#33164A
2006 Dodge
Durango SLT
$
7,420
V8, 4X4, AT, CD
#24136XA
$
18,990
Double Cab, TRD Sport, 1 Owner, 4X4
#23109A
2005 Chevy
Town & Country
$
10,575
Limited, Leather, Dual Power Seat, DVD,
63,000 Miles
#33108ZA
2004 Lexus
RX330
$
15,950
1 Owner, 6 Cyl, AWD, Leather, Moonroof
#33052A
OVER 100 PRE-OWNED VEHICLES IN-STOCK!
WE NEED YOUR VEHICLE!
Top Dollar Paid For Your Trade Or Used Vehicle
CALL US TODAY! For Complimentary Appraisals
* $1000 rebate applies to all new Toyota leases, on approved credit, plus tax and license fees and $89 doc fee, take delivery by 11/26/12, see dealer for complete details. + 0% for 60 months available on new ʼ12 Tundra, ʼ13 Tundra, ʼ13 Sienna, ʼ13 Highlander (excludes Hybrid),
ʼ13 Venza, ʼ12 Rav4, ʼ12 Avalon, ʼ12 Camry, ʼ13 Corolla, on approved credit, with $0 down, plus $89 doc fee, take delivery by 12/3/12.
No Appointment Necessary
All Makes and Models
Relax and Enjoy our Customer Lounge
Quick Lame Hours:
Monday - Thursday: 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Friday: 7:00 am - 6:00 pm • Saturday: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
2008 Chevy
Impala LT
$
12,350
Leather, Power Seats
#24072A
2008 Toyota
YARIS
$
11,750
4 Cyl, AT, AC, 40,000 Miles
#23891A
2007 Toyota
CAMRY LE
$
13,575
4 Cyl, Power Seat, CD
#16240RXA
2004 Dodge
INTREPID SE
$
3,995
2.7, CD, Aluminum Wheels
#33151B
BLACK FRIDAY SERVICE SPECIALS! Good through November 30th
2723 Fifth Ave. S. Fort Dodge • 515-576-7505 • 800-362-2174 • www.fdford.com
Sales Hours: Monday - Thursday: 8:00 am - 7:00 pm, Friday: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm, Saturday: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
2006 Saab
Aero Convertible
$
12,852
6 Cyl, Leather, Power Seat, 73,000 Miles
#24042XB
$
85 REBATE
When you
buy 4 Tires
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
Available on most brands
$25 instant savings,
$60 mail-in rebate.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY • EXPIRES 11-30-12 • NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY • EXPIRES 11-30-12 • NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS
$
50 REBATE
On a Motorcraft
Complete Brake Service
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
Only available on
Ford, Lincoln or Mercury vehicles.
HEATING
SYSTEM CHECK
$
19
95
Includes:
• Check coolant level
and protection
• Measure temp of
heater outlets
• Check thermostat
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY • EXPIRES 11-30-12 • NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY • EXPIRES 11-30-12 • NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
$
5 OFF
Any Oil
Change
C
O
U
P
O
N
S
2005 Toyota
Tacoma
515-576-5645
“Fixed Right the First Time, On Time.”
Business Hours:
Mon-Fri: 7:30 am - 5:30 pm • Sat: 9:00 am - Noon
2011 Ford
Fusion SE
$
17,950
4 Cyl, Power Seat, CD, 1 Owner
#33214A
2010 Lincoln
MKZ
$
22,900
Moonroof, 6 Disc
#24067P
2010 Ford
Fusion SE
$
15,988
4 Cyl, FWD, AT, Moonroof, CD, 1 Owner,
34,000 Miles
#24128A
2008 Toyota
SOLARA SLE
$
21,850
V6, Convertible, Leather, 6 Disc, Leather,
1 Owner, 26,000 Miles
#23499B
2009 Lincoln
MKS
$
19,960
FWD, 3.7L, V6, Leather, Navigation,
Moonroof, 1 Owner
#33155A
on all New Toyota leases
0
%
60
Months
for
In addition to the current rebates and discounts
$
1,000 Rebate
ON 9 TOYOTA MODELS
*
+
14A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
We accept Bank
Cards ...
Mastercard, Visa
and Discover,
for your
convenience
No Appointment Necessary
Available During
Pharmacy Hours
New temperature recommendations
bring tastier meats to the holiday table!
When it comes to holiday meals, flavor is foremost, whether it’s the traditional big holiday turkey, small rolled
beef roast or a salmon fillet. The cut you start with is important, but so is the cooking temperature. Following the
updated cooking temperature recommendations released earlier this year by the U.S. Department of Agriculture
(U.S.D.A) keeps meats safe as well as tender and delicious.
U.S.D.A. gave us only three numbers to remember:
145°F for all steaks, roasts and chops with a 3-minute rest. This includes beef, pork, veal and lamb.
U.S.D.A. found that the three-minute rest makes meat just as safe as cooking to the previously recommended
160°F. Lower temperature means a moister meat with more flavor.
Beef and pork will be pink at this temperature. The redness is not blood. It is something called myoglobin which
holds oxygen in muscle. Today’s lean pork loin roasts dry out easily, so cooking them to the lower temperature
helps keep pork tender.
145°F for most seafood. The thermometer is best, but unlike for meats, you can tell when seafood is done by
looking at it. Fish, such as salmon, should be opaque and separate easily with a fork
160°F for all ground meat except poultry. Because bacteria on the outside of meat gets mixed into the
product during grinding, the higher temperature is important.
165°F for all poultry. Use this to gauge the doneness and safety of whole
birds, pieces and ground turkey or chicken. This lower temperature keeps
breast meat moist.
Use a food thermometer. You can’t tell if the
temperature of meat is safe by looking at it.
Thermometers are located in the utensil section on
the end cap of aisles 14 and 15 - or ask one of our
friendly smiles for assistance.
Instant-read thermometers are easy to use. Look for the
small indentations on the probe and insert the thermometer
deep enough into the meat to cover the indentations. Remove the
thermometer before putting meat back in the oven or on the grill.
This information is not intended as medical advice.
Please consult a medical professional for individual advice.
Jennifer Hackbarth, RD, LD
Humboldt Hy-Vee Dietitian
515-332-1498 • jhackbarth@hy-vee.com
Tuesdays and Thursdays 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.
Dining with the Dietitian – FREE
Tuesday, November 27, 2:00 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.
Humboldt Hy-Vee Dining Area
Join your Hy-Vee dietitian for Dining with the
Dietitian in our dining area! This month’s topic will
be Good Fats 101. We will be discussing dietary
fat; the good, the bad and how to eat the right ones.
Section B Thursday, November 22, 2012 Thursda
Youth grappling action
Humboldt hosted a youth wrestling tournament on Saturday, Nov. 17, at Humboldt High School. Gaige Allen (top) of
Humboldt is shown trying to apply a half nelson during one of his matches. See more photos at www.humboldtnews.com.
The annual Frank Gotch Youth Wrestling Tournament will be held on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013.
See Wildcat football, 2B
Wildcats place 10 on All-District football team
Banquet honors Class 3A District 3 champion Humboldt Wildcat football squad
Area players
named to
all-state
football teams
Ben
Jacobson
Brady
Ross
Don
Smith
Bryan
Larson
Nikko
Wheeler
Tyler
Zaugg
Jerod
Hauck
Garrett
Nelson
Ryan
Lee
Cody
Weisbrich
Marie Hadar and the Arkansas State University women’s vol-
leyball team saw their season come to an end in the semifinals
of the Sun Belt Conference tournament last week.
In a Nov. 16 match against Western Kentucky in Bowling,
Green, KY, the Red Wolves fell by scores of 25-19, 25-11 and
25-15. The loss ends the 2012 season for Arkansas State, which
compiled an overall match record of 19-14.
Hadar, a sophomore from Humboldt, led A-State with eight
kills and a .353 attacking percentage. A-State was the No. 5 seed
in the tournament while Western Kentucky was the top seed and
ranked in the top 20 nationally.
In the conference tournament opener on Nov. 15, Hadar had
14 kills as the Red Wolves defeated No. 4 seed Arkansas-Little
Rock, 3-1.
A-State wrapped up its regular season a week earlier with an
8-6 record in conference play. They lost to North Texas in four
sets but defeated the University of Louisiana-Monroe in four
sets. A-State finished third in the conference standings. North
Texas and the University of Arkansas-Little Rock finished 9-5
with North Texas claiming the conference title.
Hadar had a career-high .824 attacking percentage against
Louisiana-Lafayette on Nov. 9. She connected on 14 kills in 17
attempts and did not have an error. That percentage is the highest
of any A-State player, or Sun Belt player this season. Her 14 kills
were also her highest total at that point in the season.
The winner of the conference tournament earned an automatic
berth in the NCAA tournament.
Hadar, A-State women
fall in Sun Belt
Conference semifinal
By Phil Monson
Class 3A District 3 champion
Humboldt placed 10 players on
the coaches’ post-season all-
district football team.
Wildcat head coach Greg
Thomas and his staff made the
announcement at the team’s
dinner banquet held Monday
night (Nov. 19) at the school
cafeteria.
The event paid tribute to the
Wildcat program, which went
7-4 overall in 2012, including
5-1 and first in district play. The
school returned to the playoffs
for the first time in six years and
went 1-1.
First-team all-district selec-
tions include senior quarterback
Ben Jacobson, senior offensive
lineman Bryan Larson, senior
offensive lineman Don Smith,
sophomore running back Brady
Ross, junior defensive lineman
Nikko Wheeler and senior util-
ity player Tyler Zaugg.
Honorable mention selec-
tions for the Wildcats include
senior safety/outside linebacker
Jerod Hauck, senior linebacker
Ryan Lee, senior tight end Gar-
rett Nelson and senior offensive
lineman Cody Weisbrich.
Ross led the district in rush-
ing yards with 234 attempts
for 1,381 yards and 18 touch-
downs. His longest TD was 57
yards. He averaged 5.9 yards
per carry. Ross led the district
in scoring with 114 points. Ross
was also second in the district
in tackles with 105, including
72 solo stops.
Jacobson led the district in
passing yards with 1,380 yards
on 87 of 172 completions. He
had 14 touchdowns and three
interceptions. The longest was
for 58 yards. His quarterback
rating was 141.3.
Zaugg was second in the
district in receiving yards with
26 catches for 378 yards and
three touchdowns. The longest
was 40 yards. Zaugg also led
the district in kickoff returns
with 11 for 368 yards and two
touchdowns. His longest was
90 yards at Algona. He was
seventh in the league in punt
returns.
Nelson was seventh in the
district in pass receiving with
257 yards on 21 catches with
three touchdowns. Lee was
sixth in the district in tackles
with 79 tackles, including 38
solos.
Thomas and his staff in-
troduced each squad member
and reviewed the past season.
Coaches Greg Wickett and
Corey Matson introduced the
junior varsity, which posted an
overall record of 6-2. The ninth
grade squad went 4-5 overall.
“The JV was a good group to
work with. They played well,
especially early in the season,”
Wickett said. “We had some
injuries at the end of the year,
but when you look back, overall
it was a very good year.”
“Now the challenge to those
players starts now in November
to prepare for next year. Not
next August,” Wickett said.
“The freshmen lost a couple
of close games the first few
weeks of the season but came
back to win over Iowa Falls
and things started clicking after
that,” Beaman said. “We really
enjoyed coaching these guys
Humboldt High basketball player April Jones (white)
posts up down low against teammate Erica Lane dur-
ing a recent pre-season practice in the Wildcat gym.
Humboldt opened its season at home on Nov. 20 against
Pochontas Area. The Wildcats will entertain Hampton
on Nov. 27 in a JV/varsity contest at 6:15 p.m. Humboldt
Independent photo.
Corwith-Wesley-LuVerne guard Megen Studer drives
against a West Hancock defender last week in the CWL
Jamboree in Corwith on Nov. 13. Studer and the Panthers
will travel to Belmond on Nov. 26 and host North Iowa
on Nov. 27. Photo courtesy Joella Leider.
A trio of area high school football players
have been named all-state in their respective
classes by the Iowa Newspaper Association
and the Des Moines Register.
Humboldt has two players selected in Class
3A. Senior offensive lineman Bryan Larson
was selected second-team by the Register and
third-team by the INA. Humboldt sophomore
Brady Ross was also selected as a second-
team linebacker by the Register and third-
team by the INA.
West Bend-Mallard/GC-B’s Nathan
Grimm, a junior linebacker, was chosen
second-team defense in Eight-Man by the
INA.
Among the area players chosen in Class
3A on the first-team unit include Spencer
lineman Austin Allen, South Tama running
back Kyle Stephenson and South Tama punter
Sam Kuhter.
The 3A second-team includes Clear Lake
senior defensive lineman Bryson Hamilton,
Waverly-Shell Rock junior defensive lineman
Alex Moerer, South Tama senior offensive
lineman Trevor Rohach and Spencer defen-
sive back Blake Altenhofen.
The 3A third-team unit includes Webster
City senior tight end Boone Myers, Clear
Lake junior linebacker Pete Swenson, South
Tama linebacker Erik Lux, Waverly defensive
back Dan Stensland and LeMars punter Con-
nor Delfs.
The Eight-Man first-team included New-
ell-Fonda linebacker Tigo Johnson and
Graettinger-Terril/Ruthven-Ayrshire punter
Blaze Alesch. Marcus-Meriden-Cleghorn’s
Duylan Speier, Tanner Utesch and Levi
Letsch were named first-team. H-LP's Eli
Ihnen was named to second-team, along with
NF's Johnathan Johnson. H-LP quarterback
Colin Brons was named third-team.
HHS represented in all-star volleyball series
Humboldt High School had a strong representation in the
Tri-State All-Star Volleyball series which took place Nov. 17 in
Mason City at North Iowa Area Community College.
Humboldt senior volleyball standouts Erica Lane and Kaitlynn
Vought played for Team Iowa in matches against Team Minne-
sota and Team Wisconsin. Humboldt High head coach Connie
Rasmussen coached Team Iowa.
“It was a fun day. There were no statistics taken but Erica and
Kaitlynn both played very well,” Rasmussen said. “Erica played
as an outside hitter and Kaitlynn played middle and right side.
Both did awesome and represented their school and conference
with pride. The format was three games with the first two to 25
and the third to 15.”
“We lost to Team Minnesota. Team Wisconsin beat Team Min-
nesota and we beat Team Wisconsin. It was crazy how evenly-
matched the teams were. We had eight girls on our Team Iowa
and they were very nice girls and fun to coach,” Rasmussen said.
“It was a fun day and an honor to be chosen to coach Team Iowa,”
said Rasmussen, who has compiled a career won-loss record of
261-169-10 since taking over the Humboldt head coaching posi-
tion in 1999.
2B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
Zach Parle, a junior on the Humboldt High School boys’
cross country team this past season, is shown here compet-
ing for the Wildcats during a meet early in the 2012 season.
Humboldt Independent photo.
Editor’s note: A portion of
this story was cut off in last
week’s issue. The entire story
follows in its entirety. The In-
dependent regrets the error.
Uncertainty may have ex-
isted when the Humboldt High
School girl-boy cross country
teams began their season three
months ago.
But there is nothing uncer-
tain about the Wildcats’ future
after wrapping up the 2012
season recently. The Wildcats
saw extensive growth in several
areas that are fueling optimism
for 2013.
That was the message Wild-
cat head coach Dean Clasen
presented at the team banquet
held last week (Nov. 6) at the
middle school cafeteria.
Clasen, Humboldt’s veteran
coach, greeted a squad of new-
comers when practice began
back on Aug. 6. A total of 13
seniors from the 2011 squad
had graduated, including five
of the top seven runners from
both the boys and the girls’
teams, so it was no secret that
Humboldt had a number of
positions to fill
“Add to those losses an ad-
ditional three members of the
JV boys team that didn’t return
and it was easy to assume that
our number of runners would
be really low,” Clasen said.
“As always seems to happen,
we had several upper classmen
join the boys team for their first
cross country experience and
their presence, along with a
nice-sized freshman boys class,
boosted the boys numbers to
21. More than we had a year
ago.”
“The girls’ situation looked
pretty grim at the first practice.
With just four girls returning
from last year’s squad (two
of which had been rehabbing
injuries) and a lone freshman,
it didn’t take a genius to figure
out that we might have trouble
earning a team score in the
upcoming season,” Clasen said.
“By the end of the first week,
the recruiting efforts of the
tam were rewarded with the
addition of three more girls,”
Clasen said. “Yet another girl
joined us late in the season to
bring the total to nine runners
for the girls.”
“As the season unfolded, it
quickly became evident that all
of the girls would be needed to
insure having a scoring team.
A variety of injuries, most of
them chronic, sidelined several
of the girls for multiple meets
which impeded the progress of
the team,” Clasen said. “The
boys, on the other hand, re-
mained pretty healthy through-
out the season. There were
a couple of JV runners who
missed meets but those who
ran varsity remained healthy
enough to run in nearly all of
the meets.”
The Wildcat varsity girls
were hampered by the absence
of junior Karlee Peyton, who
sat out much of the season with
a stress fracture discovered in
one of her feet in late August.
Peyton didn’t return until the
conference meet in Algona on
Oct. 9.
The newcomers came along
and saw growth in helping the
girls and boys squads compete.
The boys finished fifth and the
girls were seventh in the con-
ference meet scoring. While
the girls saw their three-year
reign as NCC champion end
optimism prevailed as Clasen
continued to be impressed with
his team’s improved times and
competitive efforts in each
race.
Sam Larson, one of the top
runners in the area and in the
state, finished third in the NCC
and later advance to state,
where she was seventh overall
with a school record time of
14:58.
“Sam represented Humboldt
as the school’s lone state quali-
fier. Sam had an excellent race,
finishing seventh overall and
re-setting the school record
in the process. Sam’s placing
was an improvement from her
ninth-place finish a year ago,”
Clasen said.
The squad had just two
seniors in Colton Schnetzer
and newcomer Ben Wadsley.
Schnetzer finished 10
th
in the
conference meet. Wadsley was
hampered by a knee injury.
“Ben battled pain from in-
juries that he had incurred
during other sports and was
not able to compete in a race.
He was responsible for getting
his sister, Caitlyn, to join us so
he had a bigger impact on the
girls program,” Clasen said.
“Colton has been an inte-
gral part of the cross country
program for each of his four
years of participation in the
program,” Clasen said. “He has
been a strong leader and led by
example with a lot of summer
miles and running road races
in the fall. He had lowered
his season average from his
sophomore yeare by 1:21 and
came close to matching that
improvement with a 59-second
improvement this season.”
“While he may have fallen
short of his goal to qualify
for state, he practiced and
raced like a winner all season.
Like others before him, he has
shown just how much you can
accomplish when you make
the commitment to improve
yourself,” Clasen said.
Clasen was again assisted by
Rhonda Van Pelt, who guided
the junior varsity and middle
school. The middle school in-
cluded 13 seventh graders and
eight eighth graders.
“I think we have a tremen-
dous opportunity to have really
good boys and girls teams next
year. It’s not unusual for one
runner to improve 30 seconds
from one year to the next with-
out doing much in between
seasons. But getting in 300
plus miles next summer could
result in 45 to 60 seconds of
improvement,” Clasen said.
“If you look at the state meet
times, I think you’ll see that
we are not very far away from
being able to run those kinds
of times,” Clasen said. “For the
teams to be as successful as I
think they can be, it will take
a team effort. Are you willing
to commit to an off-season of
running to vault us to the top of
the standings?”
2012 HUMBOLDT
CROSS COUNTRY
Seniors
Colton Schnetzer, Ben Wadsley.
Juniors
Sam Larson, Karlee Peyton, Alex-
is Warden, Michael Bowden, Reed
Burres, Keegan Christensen, Austin
Flick, Nick Heider, Terence Kiley, Ben
Madison, Jacob Miller, Zachary Parle,
Will Pogge, Brian Scholl.
Sophomores
Abbey Gargano, Kessa Kuyper,
Gunnar Erickson, Connor Fiddler,
Demetrius Friedl, Isaiah Mooney,
Damian Warden.
Freshmnen
Kendra Beaman, Maddie Kampen,
McKennon Myott, Caitlyn Wadsley,
Alex Copper, Nick Ellis, Collin Flick,
Jonathon Schaffer.
Team managers
Allix Kirchhoff, Elizabeth Skow,
Gloria Beltran, Alex Gomez.
North Central All-Conference
Sam Larson, 3
rd
. Jacob Miller, 4
th
.
Colton Schnetzer, 10
th
.
State Qualifiers
Sam Larson, 7
th
.
Most Improved in 2012
1
st
race to best race
Caitlyn Wadsley –3:06. McKennon
Myott –2:56. Kendra Beaman –2:47.
Alexis Warden –2:36. Gunnar Erick-
son –4:37. Damian Warden –3:05.
Austin Flick –3:02. Zachary Parle
–2:53.
Most Improved Season average
Compared 2011 ave. to 2012 ave.
Sam Larson -:15 (15:50 to 15:35).
Reed Burres –1:33 (21:21 to 19:48).
Michael Bowden –1:18 (19:14 to
17:56). Demetrius Friedl –1:04 (20:40
to 19:36).
Tens (ran in all possible varsity
races)
Col t ron Schnet zer, Mi chael
Bowden, Jacob Miller, Will Pogge,
Maddie Kampen, Sam Larson.
Best average team finish
Sam Larson, Colton Schnetzer
Second best average team finish
Maddie Kampen, Jacob Miller
Fastest times of 2012
Sam Larson 14:58. Maddie Kam-
pen 16:18. Caitlyn Wadsley 17:59.
Jacob Miller 16:46. Colton Schnetzer
17:04. Michael Bowden 17:15.
Fastest averages of 2012
Sam Larson 15:35. Maddie Kam-
pen 16:53. Abbey Gargano 18:59.
Colton Schnetzer 17:43. Jacob Miller
17:46. Michael Bowden 17:56.
Humboldt school records
Sam Larson 14:58. Matt Lindaman
16:00.
Banquet honors Wildcat cross country team
this season.”
Thomas looked back on the
2012 campaign, which saw a
squad, led by a big senior class
of 25, emerge and grow after a
somewhat rough start.
“When I think back about the
football season, if I could sum
up the 2012 football season,
in one word, I come up with
selfless,” Thomas said. “It re-
ally started with the 25 seniors
and trickled all the way down
through. We had good leader-
ship and it was all about the
team.”
“There weren’t egos we had
to deal with. A lot of times in
sports when we see someone
do something outstanding, they
tear their helmet off and beat
their chests and draw attention
to themselves,” Thomas said.
“That’s not what athletics is
about.”
“We talked instead of hold-
ing up a finger stating number
one, we held up a fist as a
symbol. We can do anything
together. We can’t do anything
necessarily of ourselves, but
we can do anything together,”
Thomas said.
“I will always look back
on the 2012 season and team
and think about those things,”
Thomas said.
“Not only did we have great
team guys, we had some really
intelligent guys. It’s really a
lot easier to coach when they
understand what you are talking
about and they are students of
the game and in the classroom,”
Thomas said.
“Some of the goals the se-
niors set for the squad include
hardworking, disciplined, being
together on and off the field,
unselfish, believe in each other.
Set good example on and off
the field. Be aggressive. Be
fearless. Have leaders from all
Wildcat football
continued from B front
classes. Play all four quarters.
Persistent. Positive attitude.
And have fun but play hard,”
Thomas said. “When I look
back at the 2012 season, I will
remember those things.”
Humboldt lost its non-district
season opener at Clarion on a
last-second field goal and then
blitzed South Central Calhoun,
45-6 in week two, only to for-
feit the contest after learning
two days later an ineligible
reserve player saw action in the
final minutes.
Humboldt opened district
play in a frustrating, 26-7 loss
at Iowa Falls before righting its
ship with seven straight victo-
ries to take the district title and
advance into post-season.
“The way we finished the
Clarion game and the way we
played against South Central
Calhoun showed glimpses of
what could be. Then we went
down to Iowa Falls and got off
to a rough start to begin dis-
trict play,” Thomas said. “But
we came back to win the next
seven.”
“In district play – the kids
found a way to win. There was a
four-game district stretch where
we were outgained yardage-
wise 1,128 to 1,111. We only
ran 187 offensive plays in those
four games to our opponents’
240. Yet, we still went 4-0 in
that stretch,” Thomas said.
“Yet in that stretch, we
blocked two punts. We ran three
kickoffs back for touchdowns.
We recovered 11 fumbles and
intercepted seven passes,”
Thomas said. “And did not
throw a single interception and
fumbled only three times.”
“We had a plus-15 turnover
ratio in those four games,”
Thomas said. “The kids found
a way to win. They believed
in themselves, each other and
the coaching staff. It was a fun
thing to be a part of.”
“The long-awaited return to
the playoffs came again, too.
It’s a little bit nerve-wracking
as a coach with short turn-
around time from the last game,
but it’s a fun environment to be
a part of,” Thomas said. “The
kids handled it in stride and
were very focused. Just a great
experience and I’m glad we got
to share it with them.”
“I consider these guys part
of my family forever. I’m there
for you if you need me down
the road. I will always try to be
there for you,” Thomas said.
“I hope our football program
has a lot of positive impacts
on these young men. I want
what they’ve learned here to
go beyond their high school
years,” Thomas said. “We talk
a lot about being a gentleman, a
student and an athlete. We talk
a lot about making good deci-
sions in everything they do.”
“High school athletics is one
of our last chances to instill
good values in young men be-
fore they go off into their future
endeavors,” Thomas said.
CLASS 3A DISTRICT 3
FOOTBALL TEAM 2012
FIRST TEAM OFFENSE
Quarterback: Ben Jacobson, Hum-
boldt, senior. Brandon Norman, Iowa
Falls-Alden, senior.
Running back: Cody Maulsby, Clear
Lake, senior. Brady Ross, Humboldt,
sophomore. Nate Bahr, Iowa Falls-Alden,
senior. Connor Larson, Webster City,
junior.
Tight ends: Boone Myers, Webster
City, senior. PJ Norem, Iowa Falls-Alden,
junior.
Wide receiver: Gavin Sheakley,
Clear Lake, senior. Nick Jensen, Iowa
Falls-Alden, senior. Ben Mossman,
Webster City, junior. Parker Reynolds,
Iowa Falls-Alden, senior.
Offensive line: Bryan Larson, Hum-
boldt, senior. Don Smith, Humboldt,
senior. Wiley Van Horn, Clear Lake, se-
nior. Mitchell Jordan, Clear Lake, junior.
Brayden McDaniel, Iowa Falls-Alden,
senior. Josh Wright, Waverly-Shell Rock,
junior.
Punter: Koddy Hildreth, Iowa Falls-
Alden, senior.
Kicker: Logan Kracht, Clear Lake,
junior.
FIRST TEAM DEFENSE
Defensive back: Weston Shaw,
Algona, junior. Chandler Diercks, Clear
Lake, sophomore. Dan Stensland,
Waverly-Shell Rock, junior. Nathan Steg-
gail, Waverly-Shell Rock, senior.
Defensive line: Nikko Wheeler, Hum-
boldt, junior. Steven Akers, Clear Lake,
senior. Brice Wilcke, Clear Lake, senior.
Sam Thielen, Iowa Falls-Alden, junior.
Alex Moerer, Waverly-Shell Rock, junior.
Inside linebacker: Lucas Johnson,
Charles City, senior. Pete Swenson,
Clear Lake, junior. Andrew Sauerbrei,
Iowa Falls-Alden, senior. Nelson Ball,
Webster City, junior.
Outside linebacker/defensive
end: Collin Julius, Algona, senior. Josh
Hoover, Iowa Falls-Alden, senior. Bryson
Hamilton, Clear Lake, senior. Colin Wil-
tse, Waverly-Shell Rock, junior. Adam
Staudt, Charles City, senior.
Utility: Tyler Zaugg, Humboldt,
senior. Sawyer Frideres, Algona, senior.
Mtichell Erpelding, Algona, senior.
Carson Farmer, Clear Lake, senior. Eric
Willis, Waverly-Shell Rock, junior. Bryce
Miller, Waverly-Shell Rock, senior.
Honorable mention
Humboldt: Jerod Hauck, senior.
Ryan Lee, senior. Garrett Nelson, senior.
Cody Weisbrich, senior.
Iowa Falls-Alden: Gared Stockwell,
junior. Jared Richtsmeier, senior.
Algona: Tyler Frideres, junior. Nathan
Trenary, senior. Mason Decker, junior.
Charles City: Connor Spading,
senior. Adam Murray, senior. Dylan
Caromdy, senior.
Waverly-Shell Rock: Austin Kane,
senior. Kaleb Staack, junior. BretMc-
Calla, senior. Tanner hanks, junior.
Webster City: Chris Goodrich, senior.
Trey Tesdahl, junior. Dylan Fielder, junior.
Alex Oswald, junior.
Clear Lake: Chase Lester, junior.
Brock Adams, sophomore. Connor
Nosbisch, junior. Carter Hand, junior.
Academic All-District
Humboldt: Garrett Nelson, senior.
Ben Jacobson, senior. Michael Orness,
senior. Devin Shiflett, senior. Don Smith,
senior. Peder Amundson, senior. Ryan
Lee, senior. Taylor Pedersen, senior.
Jack Curran, junior. Jonah Haselhuhn,
junior. Nikko Wheeler, junior.
Humboldt Season Statistics
Rushing: Brady Ross, 234-1,381
18 TDs. Tyler Rutz 49-271 1 TD. Nikko
Wheeler 45-248 2 TDs. Tate Illg 8-53
(1 TD. Jaxon Heinz 3-39 1 TD. Ryan
Lee 12-24 3 TDs. Aaron Mickelson 3-7,
Christian Birdsell 4-1, Michael Gargano
3-(-11), Ben Jacobson 25-(-58).
Passing: Jacobson 87 of 172 for
1,380 yards, 14 TDs, 3 interceptions,
141.3 rating. Gargano 2 of 3 for 21 yards.
Receiving: Tyler Zaugg 26-378 3
TDs. Matt Pogge 16-331 3 TDs. Garrett
Nelson 21-257 3 TDs. Jaxon Heinz 8-144
3 TDs. Landon Nokleby 4-127 1 TD. Je-
rod Hauck 6-98, Jack Curran 1-13, Nikko
Wheeler 1-8, Christian Birdsell 1-8, Tyler
Rutz 1-7.
Tackles (solo-assist): Brady Ross
72-33 105, Ryan Lee 38-41 79, Alex
Nelson 47-24 71, Nikko Wheeler 30-
23 53, Garrett Nelson 20-32 52, Jerod
Hauck 20-23 43, Taylor Pedersen 21-20
41, Don Smith 20-20 40, Bryan Larson
20-14 34, Cody Weisbrich 14-19 33, Ben
Jacobson 13-7 20, Michael Orness 13-7
20, Devin Shiflett 6-6 12, Aaron Mickel-
son 6-1 7, Michael Gargano 4-2 6, Tyler
Zaugg 3-3 6, Conner Thompson 4-1 5,
Jaxon Heinz 4-0 4, Blaine Struthers 3-1
4, Matt Pogge 3-0 3, Ian Hadar 1-1 2,
Peder Amundson 1-1 2, Dylan Hendricks
0-2 2, Geoff Bruder 2-0 2, Austin Zylstra
1-0 1, Tate Illg 1-0 1, Levi Sawyer 1-0 1,
Mike Madsen 1-0 1, Adam Mickelson 1-0
1, Jack Curran 0-1 1, Connor Vitzthum
1-0 1.
Interceptions: Jerod Hauck 4, Alex
Nelson 3, Michael Orness 1, Ben Jacob-
son 1, Landon Nokleby 1, Tyler Zaugg 1,
Aaron Mickelson 1.
Fumble recoveries: Ryan Lee 3, Nik-
ko Wheeler 3, Don Smith 3, Alex Nelson
3, Taylor Pedersen 2, Blaine Struthers 1,
Devin Shiflett 1, Cody Weisbrich 1.
Point after kicks: Austin Zylstra 26
out of 36 for 72.2 percent.
Field goals: Zylstra 1 of 5, 22-yard
longest.
Kickoffs: Zylstra 54 kickoffs for 2,714
yards, 9 touchbacks. Hadar 2 for 23.
Punting: Zylstra 29 punts for 918
yards 31.7 ave, 56-yarder longest.
Kickoff returns: Tyler Zaugg 11-368
(2 TDs, 90-yarder longest. Jaxon Heinz
8-212, Conner Thompson 2-58, Jerod
Hauck 1-9,Christian Birdsell 1-6.
Punt returns: Zaugg 8-71. Hauck
2-1.
Humboldt “Bad Cat” Award: Ben
Jacobson, Bryan Larson, Don Smith,
Brady Ross.
Scout Team Player of the Year
Award: Tate Illg and Aaron Mickelson.
Greg Thomas coaching record:
100-92 overall, 56-68 at Humboldt.
Compete in state
bowling competition
Aaron
Mersch
Kayden
Haggard
Brent
Oberhelman
Travis
Boughton
A group of area youth com-
peted in the Special Olympics
State Bowling competition held
on Nov. 17 in Des Moines.
A trio of Humboldt Com-
munity School athletes took
part in the event. Kayden Hag-
gard, Aaron Mersch and Travis
Boughton placed second in
their respective divisions and
each brought home a Silver
medal.
Also participating was Brent
Oberhelman from Humboldt,
who placed third in his dvision
and received a Bronze medal.
Brent Oberhelman (right) of Humboldt shared a moment
with Livermore native and current Tampa Bay Buccaneer
tight end Dallas Clark, after an Oct. 11 Bucs home game
with the San Diego Chargers. Oberhelman also met former
Iowa State player and current Bucs player Leonard Johnson.
Submitted photo.
Bowling league results at
Sundance Lanes in Humboldt.
IVY women Nov. 13
Won Lost
Miller Freightlines .................169.5 160.5
Key West Metal .......................168 162
Detrick Electric .........................165 135
EZ Trim ....................................161 169
Busy Bee Girls .........................151 179
Humboldt Office Supply ........145.5 154.5
Melody Himrod 208-572
LUCKY STRIKERS women Nov. 15
Won Lost
NW Flooring..........................191.5 168.5
Personali-Tees ......................188.5 141.5
Easy Livin Lawn Care ..............188 142
Split Happens ..........................186 174
Coca Cola ................................176 184
AmerExpress Travel .............170.5 159.5
Doll Depot ................................170 190
Vinsand Brothers ..................168.5 191.5
Busy Bee ..............................137.5 162.5
Trinkets .................................133.5 196.5
LaDonna Thompson 225-599
COMMERCIAL men Nov. 14
Won Lost
Meier.....................................225.5 134.5
Wagner Truck & Auto ...............181 149
Lange Racing ..........................151 149
Crossley Construction .............170 190
Sundance Coin ........................150 180
Sturtz Racing ........................142.5 217.5
Rick Buckley 236, Marc Pedersen 628
HAWKEYE men Nov. 15
Won Lost
Wacky GPK Shop .................229.5 160.5
The 3 X’s .................................226 164
Jeffers Wood ...........................214 176
Sit n Bull ............................... 211.5 178.5
Maxx Tree Service ................207.5 182.5
JD Metal ..................................190 200
Seiler Appliance ....................181.5 208.5
Golden Light ............................181 179
Road Kill ..................................141 219
Adams Knight & Assoc ............138 252
Jerry Lockwood 241, Shawn Sturtz 658
FOUR LINER women Nov. 16
Won Lost
Sundance Coin .....................207.5 92.5
AnderCo ...............................162.5 137.5
Fantasy Flesh .......................160.5 139.5
BC Girls ...................................154 146
House Cats ........................... 117.5 182.5
Curves .......................................98 202
Dawn Kirkpatrick 170, Deb Anderson 170,
Tiffany Thumma 432
RECREATION men Nov. 14
Won Lost
WWF Fanatics .........................163 137
Dryroom Drunks ...................160.5 139.5
Trupke Electric .........................159 141
Sturtz Racin ..........................158.5 141.5
Corey’s Team ........................154.5 145.5
Reese’s Pieces ........................145 155
Sundance Coin .....................131.5 168.5
Hormel Foods ..........................128 172
Marc Pedersen 258-686
MAJOR men Nov. 12
Won Lost
Like a Boss ..............................170 100
Easy Livin Lawn Care ...........177.5 152.5
Clay Construction ....................168 162
National Guard .....................152.5 147.5
Wacky GPK Shop .................164.5 165.5
Foertsch Plumb & Heat ...........158 172
Algona Bowlers........................156 174
AfterLife Lounge ...................155.5 174.5
Sundance Coin ........................152 178
Worthington Insurance ............136 164
Tyler McKibban 242, Kevin Rash 669
Bowling leagues
Simms, SDSU go
0-2 on the road
The South Dakota State
University wrestling team
lost two duals at Nebraska last
weekend.
The Jackrabbits lost 36-6
to North Carolina and 32-7 to
Nebraska. Freshman Brance
Simms of Gilmore City lost
2-1 to NC’s Joey Ward and
later lost 8-2 to Nebraska
veteran Shawn Nagel. SDSU
will wrestle in Columbia, MO,
against Stanford and Missouri,
on Nov. 24.
513 Sumner Ave. • Humboldt, IA 50548
515-332-2953
www.humboldtinsurance.com
Independent Insurance Agent
Your “Trusted Choice” Independent
Insurance Agent
Humboldt Ins. Mgmt. Assoc., Inc.
Shrink your car
insurance bill by 15%
We make saving money
easy. Simply pay your
premium in full and
save 15% on your auto
insurance.
Call us today for
details on this and
other discounts.
A Policy of Working Together
Call Ron Marchant
515-368-7334
50% DISCOUNT
for 1st year members.
Family Membership – 1st year... $412.50
Single Membership – 1st year... $337.50
2013 PROMOTIONAL PACKAGE
Thursday, Month, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 9A 8A The Humboldt Independent Thursday, Month, 2012
ADVI SOR: Rodd Mooney EDI TORS: Ashl ey Edge, Sarah Rasmussen, Ashl ey Samuel son
STAFF: Mi cheal Bowden, Ni ck Hei der, Ashl ey Lauger, Abby Naeve, Chase Nokl eby, Tyl er Rut z
Chase
Nokleby
Staff Writer
The Humboldt High
School does a very good job
of teaching everyone about
the many cultures around
the world. One way this is
done is through cultural trips
abroad. About every four
years Mrs. Savery and Mrs.
Wagner set up a trip with a
travel company to help stu-
dents and others experience
more of the world. Current-
ly, Mrs. Savery is setting up
a trip to take students and
others to somewhere outside
of the United States for the
summer of 2014.
Although the location for
the summer trip has not yet
been determined, a pre-sign
up has begun. Many students
have expressed interest and
are now voting on where
they would like to go. Mrs.
Savery is hoping that the
group will be able to travel
to Greece and Italy so that
students can see many of
the places referenced in their
high school classes, frst-
hand. The trip is usually a 10
to 12 day trip of site seeing,
private tours oI magnifcent
places, and spending time in
a country that not everyone
will get the chance to go and
see. The trip advisor and co-
ordinator, Mrs. Savery, who
gets a lot of help from Mrs.
Wagner, and the tour com-
panies, have always done a
great job of keeping every-
one safe and making sure
the schedule is packed full
of fun and exciting events.
Mrs. Savery and the
travel agency put the safety
oI the participants frst and
foremost. If the area that
the participants are plan-
ning to travel to is deemed
unsafe, they simply will not
go. Mrs. Savery has contin-
gencies with the company,
such as trip insurance, so
participants will not lose
their money if they are not
able to attend due to safety
issues. As Mrs. Savery said,
'SaIety is our frst priority!¨
Obviously, traveling to
a foreign country can cost
quite a bit of money, but that
is something that Mrs. Sav-
ery takes into consideration.
She plans a variety of fund-
raisers in the years leading
up to the trip to help offset
the out-of-pocket costs for
students. For the frst Iund-
raiser, participants sold But-
ter Braids, a fundraiser that
ended on November 5th. If
you were not able to support
the participants, there is no
need to worry; there will
be many more fundraisers
within the next two years.
The 2014 Student Cul-
tural Trip is a great way
for people to expand their
horizons and learn about
the world. Participants can
visit the world and learn so
much. While thinking of de-
ciding what to do, know you
are in good hands with Mrs.
Savery leading the explora-
tion. The cultural trip is a
positive event that you can
add to your life and learn
so much. The sign up is
still available, so if your 8th
grade or high school son or
daughter is interested, make
sure Mrs. Savery knows.
Chase
Nokleby
Staff Writer
With the way that the
economy is and how much
everything costs, people are
always looking for better
ways to make money fast.
While many people are ap-
plying for jobs they also
have to be prepared for what
they have to do before they
get the job. Many people
are not ready for their inter-
views but here are some tips
to help.
The frst thing to an in-
terview is the frst impres-
sion. When going to an in-
terview you always want to
dress up more than what you
think is necessary. When
walking into an interview
the employer can take one
look at you are able to judge
whether or not you are put
together, clean, and orga-
nized. One trick to looking
proper for an interview is
wearing neutral colors. You
always want to look nice and
have the employer paying
attention to you and not your
clothes. Next thing is always
try to wear clothing that
has minimal pockets. While
talking to the employer they
want to know that you are
confdent and interested in
what they are saying. The
last tip on clothing is not
overdoing your outft with
accessories. While accesso-
ries can make an outft look
very nice and put together,
you do not want to be fdget-
ing with bracelets, messing
with necklaces, or digging in
a purse.
Keeping the interview on
a good path is making sure
that your resume shows how
organized and professional
you are. When an employer
is reading through a resume
they should be able to read
the resume with ease. The
resume should be one page,
clean, not cluttered, and
have enough information to
leave the employer with no
questions about recent jobs,
but only leave them to ask
you how hard of a worker
you truly are.
While you are in the in-
terview you should always
have your portfolio on hand.
In this portfolio you should
have many things such as,
Table of Contents, Tradi-
tional Resume, Skills and
Abilities, Three Letters of
Recommendation, Awards
and Honors, Degrees, and
Transcripts. While not ev-
eryone will have all of these
documents, reasons to have
them are to distinguish your-
self from the other appli-
cants, turn the interview into
an offer, prove the abilities
and records in your resume,
and help the employer fnd
the position that is right for
you.
While in the interview,
the employer likes to know
that you are paying attention
at all times. There are many
ways to do this while eye
contact may be one of the
most important. While an
employer is talking to you,
you should have eye contact,
arms uncrossed, for ladies
ankles crossed not knees,
hands out of pockets, and a
slight lean forward towards
the employer. When doing
this, the employer will be
able to tell that you are pay-
ing attention and interested
in everything they are say-
ing.
After being asked a ques-
tion in the interview it is not
a race to answer the ques-
tion frst. Take your time,
talk slow, and show them
how calm and collected you
are. Answer the questions
in a positive and collected
order while using facts that
the employer mentioned be-
fore to prove how well you
were listening. During the
interview the employer is
looking for someone who
is confdent, able to do the
job well, handle on the spot
questions, and someone who
has done their research.
The best thing to do be-
fore an interview is research.
You do not have to know ev-
ery detail about everything
that happens, but rather be
able to impress the employ-
er on that you know what is
happening with the business
and how you would be able
a positive addition to the
team.
At the end of an interview
it is always good to leave
them with a positive image
of you in their head. The
simplest yet most important
way to do this is with a frm
handshake. Even though the
interview may have went
great many of the employers
put a huge deal of the deci-
sion the last hand shake.
While there are many parts
to an interview and much to
get ready for, the best thing
that you can do is practice.
Although you are always
able to sit down with friends
or family and ask questions,
the greatest practice is to go
in for a formal interview at
another business. Although
your interview may have
went well but were not able
get the job, always be pre-
pared for the next. While
going through the interview
process may be long and
exhausting, it will pay off
in the end. You just need to
keep your head up high and
be ready to get them in the
next interview.
There have been 178 con-
frmed sightings oI moun-
tain lions in the Midwest this
year. The Iowa Department
of Natural Resources said
mountain lions are re-popu-
lating because hunters don’t
hunt the elk and mule deer.
The mountain lion
is making a comeback into
the Midwest. Out of the 178
confrmed Midwest sight-
ings, four of them were in
Iowa. The Iowa Department
of Natural resources states,
“Mountain lions just pass
through Iowa, they don’t
stay.¨ They also said, 'Lots
of people have mistaken a
mountain lion with other
animals like a bobcat or a
yellow coated dog.¨
If you encounter a moun-
tain lion you should not run,
you should walk backward
slowly, make yourself look
big, and make loud noises. If
a mountain lion attacks you,
you should defend yourself
by trying to fnd something
sharp and poking the moun-
tain lion in the eyes.
In Des Moines, a moun-
tain lion was shot and killed
in the backyard of a man’s
home. The man who spot-
ted the mountain lion was
Jim Egan. Jim was working
in his friend’s greenhouse
in the backyard. Jim looked
down at some plants and saw
two eyes looking at him. Jim
told police that he backed
away slowly and called 911.
Although the mountain lion
had to be put down, it will
be used for research. This re-
search may to tell us where
the mountain lion has been.
Late this summer, a
mountain lion was spotted
between Algona and Hum-
boldt. Chad Beaman and
his detasseling crew had
worked in a feld that was
located six miles south and
three miles west of Algona.
The inspectors went to the
feld three weeks aIter they
were done detasseling. The
inspectors saw a mountain
lion in the next feld over.
The inspectors went over
and took pictures of the
mountain lions tracks that
were left behind.
On July 18th, Dean Kru-
ger was called out to Darrel
and Karen Beunting’s home
early in the morning. Dar-
rel and Karen stated that
their miniature horses were
attack by a mountain lion.
A small animal could not
have jumped the tall fence
where the horses were being
kept. Dean said, “The claw
marks defnitely look like a
mountain lion.¨ The owners
say the attack had to happen
within the late evening or
early morning hours.
Out of the 178 sight-
ing Iowa has had only four.
The fact that you will see
a mountain lion staying in
humboldt is going to be slim
to none.
Micheal
Bowden
Staff Writer
Abby Naeve
Staff Writer
It’s an age-old, beaten
to death debate: Mac vs.
PC. The images are clear
in all our heads; Mac us-
ers are for the starving-art-
ist and struggling-writer
types, looked down on by
the stuffy businessman
with a PC in his briefcase.
However, this is no lon-
ger the case. With Apple
in the top 5 largest com-
puter manufacturers in the
world and a 7.5% market
share, Macs are no longer
exclusively for hipsters.
In fact, over the years the
two have become incred-
ibly similar. The guts of
both computers consist of
memory, graphics cards,
and hard drives from the
same collection of suppli-
ers. (Not to mention both
use Intel processors.) The
real difference is how each
computer approaches the
operating system. In fact,
it really boils down to
each customer’s personal
preference: Safari vs. In-
ternet Explorer, iPhoto vs.
Photo Gallery, and Front
Row vs. Windows Media
Center.
Although Mac’s appli-
cations are widely consid-
ered to be faster and more
reliable, they do tend to be
$100 to $500 more expen-
sive. If you do happen to
fnd a Mac that doesn`t cost
an arm and a leg—beware.
These lower-priced Macs
will have less memory and
drive space. Nonetheless,
Macs often last longer and
may pay off in the long run.
Most PCs generally have
2GB-8GB of RAM, while
Macs have only 1GB-4GB,
as long as it’s not a custom-
ized model. Mac hard drives
are also typically smaller, but
this is most likely because
Apple applications and fles
are smaller than the PC ver-
sions. Macs, however, can
also run Windows, which is
a big plus. If you have the
money and just can’t de-
cide, choose Mac. Macs are
compatible with most other
programs, and with its stable
software, Macs really are the
best of both worlds.
Nevertheless, choosing
a computer comes down the
individual’s need. If you’re
looking for something more
visual-based, like excellent
graphics, audio, and video
entertainment, a Mac is the
way to go. For a more per-
sonalized, traditional in-
dividual, a PC’s programs
work will work better for ac-
counting and business man-
agement.
Whatever it is you’re look-
ing for—whether it be the
trendy, ready-to-use Mac, or
the more reasonably priced,
traditional PC, choose wise-
ly. Move beyond your pre-
conceived concept and buy
the computer that fts your
personal need.
Name: Magdelene Pettinger
Activities: Musical, play,
and speech.
Parents: David and Jana
Pettinger.
,I \RX FRXOG ¿QG WKH DQ-
swer to one question, what
would it be? Will I have a
long happy life?
Describe yourself using a
song, movie, or book title.
I’m Just a Kid - Simple Plan
What is your favorite
song? Living Louder - The
Cab
If you could live any-
where, where would it be
and why? Everywhere, you
can’t stay in one place your
whole life.
Where do you see yourself
in ten years? Running a
successful business.
Future Plans: Attend Cen-
tral College in the fall. Ma-
jor in business and minor in
creative writing then travel
the world.
Name: Josh Naeve
Parents: Thad and Nancye
Naeve
If you were stranded on an
island, what is one thing
you would want most? Mi-
chael Phelps with a saddle
If you could have any su-
per power, what would it
be and why? X-Ray vision
If you could eat dinner
with three people, who
would they be? Mr. Lauger,
my girlfriend Madi Bair, and
my awesome sister Abby
If you received a billion
dollars, what would you
EX\¿UVW" Friends
If you were to be famous in
the future, what would you
be famous for? Being swoll
Where do you see yourself
in ten years? In a mirror
Future Plans: Attend ISU
for a degree in Ag and/or
Business
Tyler Rutz
Staff Writer
The Mona Lisa is a very
well known painting around
the world and was painted
by Leonardo Da Vinci.
Many have tried to duplicate
this work of art and failed.
But could there be a new dis-
covery of an earlier version?
An English art collector
named Hugh Blaker was the
man who discovered this
painting in Isleworth, Lon-
don in 1913. There had been
a lot of debate on whether it
is authentic or just another
'copy cat¨ painting. But
scientists have been work-
ing very hard analyzing and
studying the painting for 35
years.
Scientists have been
running forensic analysis
that says it is the very same
woman from the previous
painting. Da Vinci created
two Mona Lisa paintings.
One for her husband and
also one for his patron.
Many believe it is a copy
because her head is not the
same shape as the other,
and the structure of her
hands. Also, the landscape is
very different in both paint-
ings. But the major reason
why many do not believe
it is by Da Vinci is because
the new one was painted on
canvas. Da Vinci preferred
to paint on wood.
There are many signs in-
dicating that it is an original
work of art, but there are
also many thing that have
people wondering. No one
really knows for sure except
for Da Vinci. Do you think
it is real?
Name: Krystalle Abbas
Parents: Dennise Terwil-
liger and Keven Abbas
What advice do you give
to the underclassmen?
Do your homework!
If you received a billion
dollars, what would you
EX\ ¿UVW" Pay for a col-
lege education
If you were to be famous
in the future, what would
you be famous for? Sing-
ing
What is your pet peeve?
When people correct me
If you could live any-
where, where would it
be and why? Florida, be-
cause I love it down there.
Where do you see your-
self in ten years? Work-
ing and making a family
Future Plans: Go to the
University of Iowa for pe-
diatrics and then further
on to Neonatology
Name: Michael Gargano
Activities: Football
Parents: Jeff and Becky
Gargano
What will you miss most
about HHS? Seeing a lot of
people everyday
What is your most
memorable high school
moment? Gangnam style
with the football players at
homecoming
What is your favorite
song? Hustla Muzik - Lil’
Wayne
If you could have any
super power, what would
it be and why? Flying, get
places faster, have fun and
site see
What is your favorite
quote? Everybody dies but
not everybody lives
Where do you see yourself
in ten years? Mansion on
a hill
Future Plans: Engineering
at ISU
Thursday, November 22, 2012 · 3B
RUTLAND-
OTTOSEN
Churches
ST. MARY’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Jim Tigges
Humboldt
SATURDAY: 4:30 p.m.,
confessions; 5 p.m., mass.
SUNDAY: 8:30 a.m., con-
fessions; 9 a.m. mass.
ABUNDANT LIFE
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Non-Denominational
Pastor Gary Goetsch
608 13th Street N.
Humboldt
SUNDAY: 10 a.m., wor ship
service; 6 p.m., Bible study.
TUESDAY: 7:30 p.m.,
prayer time.
LAKE LUTHERAN
CHURCH LCMC
Lutheran Congregation
in Mission for Christ
Pastor Truman Larson
Goldfield
SUNDAY: 9:00 a.m., wor-
ship; 10:15 a.m., Sunday
School.
HAUGE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Association of Free
Lutheran Congregations
Wayne Almlie, Lay Minister
Goldfield
SUNDAY: 9:30 a.m., Sunday
School and confirmation; 10:30
a.m., worship.
WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m., Bible
study and prayer.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Rev. Tim Rieckhoff-Faris
LuVerne
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m., wor-
ship.
WEDNESDAY: 7:30 a.m.,
Prayer Breakfast; UMW - 1
st
Wednesday of each month.
THIRD THURSDAY: 7
a.m., men's breakfast.
ZION EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(MissouriSynod)
Pastor Jason P. Peterson
Deacon Steve Struecker
LuVerne
SUNDAY: 8:45 a.m., adult
Bible classes and Sunday
School; 10:45 a.m., worship.
WEST BEND
APOSTOLIC CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
Wayne Fehr, Minister
Wayne Grimms, Minister
West Bend
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m., and 1
p.m., worship ser vices.
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Rutland
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m., wor-
ship; 11:30 a.m., coffee fel-
lowship.
ST. JOHN’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Jim Tigges
Gilmore City
SATURDAY, 7 p.m., mass.
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Gilmore City
SUNDAY: 9:30 a.m., coffee
fellowship; 10:30 a.m., wor-
ship.
SACRED HEART
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Jim TIgges
Livermore
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m.,
Mass.
IMMANUEL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Rev. Michael Botsford
Deacon Steve Struecker
Livermore
SUNDAY: 8:15 a.m., wor-
ship; Sunday school to follow.
ST. JOSEPH’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Victor Ramaeker
St. Joe
SUNDAY: 8-8:45 a.m., rec-
onciliation; 9:00 a.m., Mass,
1
st
3
rd
and 5
th
weekend of the
month.
SATURDAY: 4-4:45 p.m.,
reconciliation; 5:00 p.m.,
Mass, 2
nd
and 4
th
weekend of
the month.
THE SHARED
MINISTRY OF ROLFE
Rev. Charles Miller
Rolfe
SUNDAY: 9 a.m., worship;
10 a.m., coffee hour; 10 a.m.,
Sunday School; 10:15 a.m.
adult class – Lord’s Prayer.
ST. MARGARET’S
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Andy Hoffman
Rolfe
SUNDAY: 10:15 a.m.,
Mass.
FIRST LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Lay Pastor Dan Buhs
Gilmore City
SUNDAY: 8:45 a.m., Sun-
day school; 10 a.m., worship.
GILMORE CITY
HUMBOLDT HUMBOLDT
ST. JOE
ROLFE
LIVERMORE
BODE
GOLDFIELD
THOR
LUVERNE
PALMER
4B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Rutland
SUNDAY: 9 a.m., worship;
10 a.m., coffee fellowship.
FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Charles Luers
Pastor Christy Ehrle
Administrative Office:
107 4th St. N., P.O. Box 647
Humboldt
Daily Dial-A-Devotion
332-1899
Weekly worship services:
Saturday 5:30 p.m.
Sunday
8:55 a.m. Humboldt
9 a.m. Livermore
10:30 a.m. Gilmore City
10:30 a.m. Rutland
Coffee fellowships:
9:30 a.m. Gilmore City
10 a.m. Humboldt
10 a.m. Livermore
11:30 a.m. Rutland
FRIDAY, Nov. 23:
Church office closed.
SATURDAY, Nov. 24:
5:30 p.m., worship, Hum-
boldt center.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25:
8:55 a.m., worship, Hum-
boldt center;
9 a.m., worship, Livermore
center;
10-11 a.m., Praise Choir,
Livermore;
10:30-11:30 a.m., Sunday
school, Livermore;
10:30 a.m., worship, Rut-
land center;
10:30 a.m., worship, Gilm-
ore City center.
MONDAY, Nov. 26:
9 a.m.-2 p.m., District
UMW meeting, room 24;
9 a.m., Visitor mailed out;
5 p.m., Joyous Abandon;
5-7 p.m., Rutland chicken/
biscuits, Rutland center;
6:30-7:30 p.m., Boy Scout
pack meeting, Morehouse
Hall.
TUESDAY, Nov. 27:
9-10 a.m., Shalom Bible
study, room 21;
10-11 a.m., staffing;
3-5 p.m., Gilmore City
ASP;
3:30-6 p.m., G.E.D., room
21;
4-5 p.m., DHS meeting,
room 24;
5-6 p.m., Kiwanis, More-
house Hall;
7 p.m., Charge Conference,
sanctuary.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28:
2:45 p.m., Sounds of Cel-
ebration;
6-7 p.m., Humbells, adult
choir;
6:15-8:15 p.m., 3:6 Teen
Youth, Morehouse Hall, room
21;
7-8:15 p.m., confirmation
youth, room 30;
7 p.m., Chancel Choir.
THURSDAY, Nov. 29:
7-8:30 p.m., Beginnings,
room 21.
FRIDAY, Nov. 30:
9 a.m., bulletin prep;
2-5 p.m., Joy in my Heart
set up, Morehouse Hall.
THE
CONGREGATIONAL
UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Lisa Minor,
Director of Christian
Education
Humboldt
THURSDAY, Nov. 22: Have
a blessed Thanksgiving.
FRIDAY, Nov. 23: Church
office closed.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 9 a.m.,
Sunday school; 10 a.m., wor-
ship with Jim Sayers; 11 a.m.,
coffee and fellowship.
MONDAY, Nov. 26: 9 a.m.,
newsletter folding; 10:30 a.m.,
staff meeting; 5 p.m., CARES;
7 p.m., Al-Anon.
TUESDAY, Nov. 27: 6 p.m.,
Yoga.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28:
3:30 p.m., 4-H writers; 6:30
p.m., choir; 7 p.m., council.
OAK HILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Doug Wolter,
Senior Pastor
Brian Friedl,
Associate/Youth Pastor
Steph Heinz,
Preschool Director
Humboldt
FRIDAY, Nov. 23: 6 a.m.,
men’s Bible study.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 9:15
a.m., Sunday school; 10:30
a.m., worship; 4 p.m., middle
school Bible study; 6:15 p.m.,
high school Alive/study.
MONDAY, Nov. 26: 4:30
p.m., Prayer Ministry.
TUESDAY, Nov. 27: 7 a.m.,
men’s Bible study; 12 noon,
men’s Bible study.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28:
6:15 p.m., Awana; 6:15 p.m.,
Oak Hill Alive.
OUR SAVIOUR’S
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Gene Broughton
Pastor Matthew Manz
Humboldt
THURSDAY, Nov. 22: Have
a Blessed Thanksgiving.
FRIDAY, Nov. 23: church
will be closed.
SATURDAY, Nov. 24: 5:30
p.m., worship.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 8:30
a.m., worship; 9:30 a.m., cof-
fee; 9:45 a.m., Sunday school;
10 a.m., adult Sunday school;
10:45 a.m., children’s Hand
Bell practice; 11 a.m., praise
worship; 1 p.m., decorate the
sanctuary.
MONDAY, Nov. 26: 8 a.m.,
staff devotions.
TUESDAY, Nov. 27: 8:30
a.m., staff meeting; 10 a.m.,
study of Revelation; 7 p.m.,
Troop #108.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28:
6:30 a.m., men’s Bible study;
6:30 a.m., ladies prayer group;
8 a.m., staff devotions; 1 p.m.,
decorate ethnic trees in the
Fellowship Hall; 5:30 p.m.,
grades fifth through eighth
Game Nite; 5:45 p.m., Chil-
dren’s Choir; 6:30 p.m., youth
supper, grades fifth through
twelfth; 7 p.m., confirmation;
7 p.m., senior high Youth Nite;
7 p.m., Senior Choir.
The radio broadcast for
Sunday, Nov. 25, is sponsored
in memory of Junerose Click
by her family and friends.
ZION EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
J. K. Raether, Senior Pastor
Aaron Flatau,
Assistant Pastor
Humboldt
THURSDAY, Nov. 22:
Thanksgiving Day, office
closed.
FRIDAY, Nov. 23: NO pre-
school.
SATURDAY, Nov. 24: 8
a.m., decorate the church for
Christmas; 6 p.m., worship
with communion.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 8:30
a.m., Sunday school; 8:45
a.m., youth and adult Bible
study; 10 a.m., worship with
communion. MONDAY,
Nov. 26: 7 p.m., Elders.
TUESDAY, Nov. 27: 9:15
a.m., women’s Bible study;
6:45 p.m., women’s Bible
study.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28:
10 a.m., ladies Bible study; 6
p.m., Advent supper (LYC);
6:30 p.m., confirmation; 6:30
p.m., adult cantata choir; 7:30
p.m., Advent service; 8:30
p.m., adult regular choir.
SATURDAY, Dec. 1: 11
a.m.-1:30 p.m., Gemutlichkeit
luncheon; congregational elec-
tion before and after worship;
6 p.m., worship with commu-
nion.
SUNDAY, Dec. 2: 8:30
a.m., Sunday school; 8:45
a.m., youth and adult Bible
study; congregational election
before and after worship; 10
a.m., worship with commu-
nion.
HUMBOLDT
FAITH LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Dr. Dennis Niles,
Lead Pastor
Russell Weller, Youth Pastor
Jane Larsen, Children and
Family Director
Stacy Beschorner,
Pre-School Coordinator
Rural Palmer
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21: 7
p.m., Thanksgiving Eve ser-
vice.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 8:45
a.m., Sunday school; 10 a.m.,
worship; 10 a.m., kids’ church;
4:30 p.m., Radical Junior High
Ministry, note new time; 6
p.m., Ignite Youth Ministry.
TUESDAY, Nov. 27 : 7:30
p.m., Praise Band practice.
ST. OLAF
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Steve Bliss
Bode
THURSDAY, Nov. 22:
Thanksgiving Day, office
closed.
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 9:15
a.m., adult class; 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday school; 10:30 a.m.,
worship.
TUESDAY, Nov. 27: 8 a.m.,
women’s breakfast.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28: 3
p.m., confirmation.
THURSDAY, Nov. 29: 8
a.m., men’s breakfast.
ULLENSVANG
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Darryl Landsverk
Thor
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 9:30
a.m., coffee and fellowship; 11
a.m., worship.
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28:
5:30 p.m., confirmation.
TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Gene Broughton
Pastor Matthew Manz
Rutland - Ottosen
SUNDAY, Nov. 25: 9 a.m.,
worship – Rutland; 10:30 a.m.,
worship – Ottosen.
AGLOW presents Julie
Busby from KJYL, Saturday,
Dec. 8, 10 a.m., “CANA,” 18
S. 3rd St., Fort Dodge.
Through severe trials of
abuse, rape, walking away
from a religious cult and spiri-
tual abuse, Julie Busby has
found that she was never for-
saken by God but is beloved to
Him. She is no longer a victim
The Prayer Group of Faith United Methodist Church will
be hosting their annual Joy In My Heart Coffee on Saturday,
Dec. 1, at 9 a.m., in Morehouse Fellowship Hall and the Hum-
boldt center sanctuary. The Christmas drama this year is themed
“Follow the Star.” The cost for tickets is $3.50, available at the
church office located at 107 4
th
Street North, Humboldt, through
Nov. 29. This will be an inspirational way to experience the true
meaning of Christmas.
Victim to victorious
Joy In My Heart Coffee
The Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church Women held
a heritage bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 10. They had a
white elephant table with Christmas items and raised
$300 for the Humboldt County Food Pantry. Present-
ing the check representing the OSLC Women is Mar-
garet Tellier (left). Accepting the donation is Humboldt
County UDMO Outreach Specialist Lindsay Prather.
Humboldt Independent photo.
but victorious. Her passion is
reminding broken people that
no matter what they’ve been
through, or what they have
done there is hope, love and
healing in Jesus Christ.
Everyone is invited; bring
a friend or two with you. Re-
freshments will be available.
Any questions please call
Kelly at 515-576-2343.
CORN BELT
POWER
COOPERATIVE
1300 13th St. N.
Humboldt
515-332-2571
513 Sumner Ave.
Humboldt, IA 50548
515-332-2953
www.humboldtinsurance.com
Your “Trusted Choice”
Independent Insurance Agent
Humboldt Ins. Mgmt. Assoc., Inc.
“Your GM Country Store”
Highway 3 East
Humboldt
515-332-2764
Humboldt Downtown
Motor Bank
Gilmore City
www.bankiowabanks.com
Iowa
Tree Service
Year Round Service
Trimming • Removal • Stump Grinding
Insured • Estimates
515.825.3440
Cell 515.851.0035
Jim and Nicky Kvale
Members of Iowa and International Arborist's Assoc.
GOLDFIELD
Junction
Hwy. 3 & 169
Humboldt
515-332-2932
“The way a sandwich
should be.”
Humboldt
North and
South Facilities
515-332-2623
515-332-4104
Quality
First
Member FDIC
www.jetcompany.com
515-332-3117
This space is available FREE to any non-profit organization wishing to advertise a money-
making affair or announce a meeting or special public event. Just call the Independent
by Monday noon at 332-2514 for insertion.
NOTE: Please check the meeting dates, times and locations and any other
information. In case of error, please contact the Humboldt Independent at 332-2514.
7 O’Clock Kiwanis, every Monday, Family Table, 7 a.m.
Alanon Humboldt Meeting, Congregational UCC of Humboldt Church, 111 N. Taft St.,
(south door), Monday Evenings, 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Alcoholics Anonymous, every Monday evening, 8:00 p.m. at St. John's Parish
Center, Gilmore City.
Alcoholics Anonymous, every Monday evening at 7:00 p.m. at Humboldt County
Courthouse, Dakota City. Contact Number: 890-9136 or 332-1148, leave
message if no answer.
Alzheimers Support Group, first Tuesday, 10:00 a.m., North Care Center, Humboldt.
American Legion Auxiliary, second Monday, City Hall, Dakota City, 2:00 p.m.
American Legion Post 119, first Monday, Legion Bldg., 7 p.m.
Baptist Rebecca Circle, second Wednesday.
Business & Professional Women, fourth Wednesday, dinner, Vinny's BBQ, 5:15 p.m.
Care Center Family Group, third Monday, Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church, 7:00 p.m.
– September-November and January-June
Co-City Bus Board, first Monday, 7 a.m.
Compassionate Friends of North Central Iowa, second Monday, Algona Library,
7:30 p.m. (use west door).
Congregational UCC Women's Fellowship, first Thursday, 12:30 p.m.
Congregational UCC Women’s Fellowship Circles, third Thursday.
Dakota City Worth While Club, second Tuesday, Dakota City, 1:30 p.m.
Des Moines River Restoration Committee, third Thursday each month, 6:30 pm. at
Municipal Building in Dakota City.
Eastern Star Masonic Lodge No. 195, first Tuesday, Masonic Temple, 7:00 p.m.
Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Awareness Meetings, second Thursday of each
month, back room of Curves, 1:30 p.m. - questions? call Jodi at 332-1905
Fort Dodge Chapter of Compassionate Friends, second and fourth Tuesday, First
United Methodist Church office bldg., 1002 1st Ave. N., Fort Dodge, 7:30 p.m.
Fort Dodge Singles Dance, first Friday of each month, Eagles Ballroom, 8 p.m.-12
a.m.
Friendly Visitors of Humboldt County, Staff Meeting, 1st Tuesday, 11:30 a.m. at
Phase 1 Humboldt Homes. Board Meeting: 2nd Wednesday, 8 a.m. at Phase 1
Humboldt Homes.
Honey Bee Quilters, first Saturday of the month, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., at Our Saviour’s
Lutheran Church.
Humboldt Chapter No. 147 Order of the Eastern Star, second Monday, Masonic
Temple, 7:00 p.m.
Humboldt Chapter of the MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Society, first Wednesday of each
month, 7:30 p.m., Junior High School media center.
Humboldt County Fair Board, meets at the fairgrounds the first Monday of each
month at 7:00 p.m.
Humboldt County Genealogical Society, first Wednesday, library, 1:30 p.m.
Humboldt County Historical Association, first Monday, Clancy Building, Humboldt
County Museum, 7:30 p.m.
Humboldt County Humane Society, second Wednesday, Pasquale’s, 7 p.m.
Humboldt County Memorial Hospital Auxiliary Board, second Monday, Sun Room,
Hospital.
Humboldt Garden Club, fourth Tuesday.
Humboldt Historical Preservation Commission, first Tuesday, Humboldt City Hall,
1:00 p.m.
Humboldt Rifle and Pistol Club, second Thursday, 7:30 p.m.
Humboldt Rotary Club, Tuesdays, noon, Miller’s Landing.
Humboldt Women’s Club, first Thursday at 7 p.m. (except September and November),
Faith United Methodist Church.
Jaycees, second and fourth Tuesday each month, 7 p.m., Lomitas.
Just For Me, every Wednesday, Faith United Methodist Church, Gilmore City, 7:30
p.m. Exercise video, Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 6:45 p.m. Free country
line dancing, Sundays, 6:30 p.m.
Kiwanis Aktion Club, second and fourth Tuesday, 5:15 p.m. at Faith United Methodist
Church.
Lions Club, first and third Tuesday of every month at Vinny's in Dakota City, 6:00 p.m.
LUV Iowa, second Monday, Vinny's in Dakota City, 7 p.m.
Methodist UMW Circles, third Thursday.
Methodist UMW General Meeting, first Thursday.
Noon Kiwanis, every Monday, Vinny's BBQ, noon.
OxBow Chapter of Izaak Walton, second Wednesday, OxBow Shelter House, noon
Royal Neighbors, first Tuesday, noon
Three Rivers Trail Council, 2nd Thursday of every month, 7 p.m., OxBow Lodge.
VFW and VFW Auxiliary 5240 Sing-A-Long, fourth Thursday, North and South Care
Centers, 6:15 p.m.
VFW and VFW Auxiliary 5240, third Wednesday, VFW Hall, Dakota City, 7:00 p.m.
We Weavers Club, third Tuesday.
Weight Watchers, every Tuesday, Senior Citizens Center, Weigh-in 9:00 a.m., meeting
9:30 a.m.; Weigh-in 5:30 p.m., meeting 6:00 p.m.
Women's Connection, third Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., nonprofit group.
Zion Lutheran, Humboldt LWML, second Thursday, Day Circle at 9:30 a.m., Evening
Circle at 7:00 p.m.
Humboldt Independent
NEWS AND ADVERTISING
3:00 P.M. ON MONDAY
Reminder ad deadline:
Noon on Mondays
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 5B
Confirmation services were held at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church on Sunday,
Oct. 28. The confirmands and Pastors are pictured above.
Front row (l to r): Dylan Applegate, Hannah Halvorson, Justin Pedersen, and
Jayden Carlson. Back row: Pastor Matthew Manz, Austin Meier, Talyn Larsen, No-
lan Hacker, and Pastor Gene Broughton.
By Kirk Hundertmark
LIVERMORE LADIES
AUXILIARY UNIT 415
PRESENT YEARS OF
SERVICE AWARDS
At their regular meeting
held Monday evening, Nov.
12, Livermore American Le-
gion Auxiliary Unit 415 pre-
sented awards to Frieda Gar-
man 60 years, past treasurer;
Jeannette Underberg, 48 years;
and Freda Cran, 45 years, a
past president, marking mile-
stones in their continuous
years of support and service
to the American Legion Aux-
iliary. Congratulations to these
women for outstanding ser-
vice.
LIVERMORE TRAIN
WRECK WINERY TO
HOLD PAINTING EVENT
The Train Wreck Winery
in Algona will be hosting a
“Creative Spirits of Okoboji”
on Tuesday evening, Nov. 27,
starting at 6:30 p.m., at the
Train Wreck Winery Depot in
Algona. Creative Spirits will
provide all of the supplies and
each participant will complete
an acrylic painting on a 16x20
canvas for a low cost of $35.
Bring a friend and come join
in the fun while relaxing with
your friends as you are guided
step by step in the completion
of this fun painting event. You
may check out their website at
www.creativespiritsokoboji.
com or call (712) 336-8186.
LIVERMORE AREA
TOWNSHIP TRUSTEE’S
REAPPOINTED
In the November election
there were no declared candi-
dates for the two open Hum-
boldt Township Trustee posi-
tions currently held by Bruce
Foth and James Halsrud. At
the election both Bruce Foth
and James Halsrud received
enough write in votes to get
back in office so the town-
ship officers will not change,
and they will continue to serve
with Clerk Harold Willey and
Greg Lempke.
LIVERMORE CITY
COUNCIL HAS A NEWLY
ELECTED COUNCIL
MEMBER
In the November election
there was a Livermore City
Council seat vacancy left when
Darla Van Gronigen turned in
her resignation because she
was moving to Humboldt.
Running for her seat and to fill
out her remaining term to the
end of 2013, were Crista Jen-
sen with 98 votes and George
McMahon with 61 votes. A
few write in votes were Robert
Foth, two votes; Alanna War-
ren, three votes; Jason McK-
ibban, one vote; Albert Berte,
one vote; and Darold Hofer,
one vote.
LIVERMORE CITY
COUNCIL WILL
CONTINUE THE
CHRISTMAS LIGHTING
CONTEST
The City of Livermore will
again this year continue with
the Christmas Lighting Con-
test. First place will receive
a $50 credit on their electric
bill; second place will receive
a $25 credit on their electric
bill, with third place receiv-
ing a $15 credit on their elec-
tric bill. The judging will take
place from Dec. 17 through
Dec. 21, sometime between 6
and 10 p.m. All residents are
invited to decorate and “Light
up Livermore.”
LIVERMORE WILL
HOLD SANTA DAYS
SATURDAY, DEC. 15
The Livermore American
Legion Auxiliary Unit 415 will
be in charge of the Livermore
Santa Clause Day, Saturday
Dec. 15. It will start at 10 a.m.,
at the Livermore American Le-
gion building basement. Team
Livermore will be helping
with the event and fundraising
duties.
LIVERMORE WATER
PROJECT HAS
ABRUPTLY BEEN PUT
ON THE BACK BURNER
Back in September the Iowa
Department of Natural Re-
sources design standards said
that a minimum of two water
sources should be provided by
every city in Iowa and they are
highly recommending that the
City of Livermore construct a
second well to add to their cur-
rent source water supply.
The City of Livermore then
started looking into the pos-
sibility of obtaining a CDBG
grant by sending out a one-
page survey to obtain infor-
mation necessary to apply for
an Iowa Community Develop-
ment Block Grant. There are
approximately 166 households
in the Livermore city limits.
The City of Livermore needed
to have an 80 percent return on
the survey, in order to apply
for CDBG grant money. This
survey returned by the Liver-
more citizens was excellent.
At the Sept. 4 council meet-
ing, Bill Goldy and David
Doxtad from I and S Group
discussed the water project
and gave the council upcom-
ing dates for the grant applica-
tions due by Nov. 14. A motion
was made by Tom Collins to
approve hiring I and S to pro-
ceed with a CDGB grant ap-
plication for the Water Supply,
Treatment, Storage and Distri-
bution system project update
and securing funding sources.
The motion was seconded by
Penny Porter, and also ap-
proved by Aaron Crahan and
Ryan Fredin for a unanimous
council vote in favor of the
project.
The council decided to hold
a special meeting Sept. 17,
for a preliminary review and
further discussion at which
time Mr. Doxtad from I and
S Group presented the pre-
liminary engineering report
for the project and presented a
$935,000 opinion of probable
cost for the water system im-
provements. The council then
held a question and answer pe-
riod with Mr. Goldy discuss-
ing the financing alternatives
to the fund the project.
A motion was made by
Penny Porter and seconded
by Ryan Fredin, and also ap-
proved by Aaron Crahan, Tom
Collins and Crista Jensen, for
a unanimous vote to precede
with the CDBG requirements
for the public notice for the
Water Project in the Hum-
boldt Independent. A motion
by Tom Collins and seconded
by Crista Jensen, and also ap-
proved by Aaron Crahan, Ryan
Fredin and Penny Porter, for a
unanimous vote to change the
Oct. 1 meeting to Oct. 8 to al-
low time for this public notice
publication.
At the Oct. 8 council meet-
ing a public hearing was held
for the Procurement of Engi-
neering Services for the 2012
Water System Improvement
Project and CDBG applica-
tion. A motion was made by
Penny Porter and seconded
by Crista Jensen, and also ap-
proved by unanimous vote
of all councilpersons present
to hire I and S Group, Archi-
tects, Engineers and Planners
of Mankato, MN, as the engi-
neers for the Livermore Water
project.
The I and S Group gave an
overview of the proposed wa-
ter project and also on the over
30 year old water treatment
facility that is in much needed
improvement, repair and/or re-
placement.
Some of the items dis-
cussed included valves that
do not operate properly; the
chlorination system needs to
be improved to include a sec-
ond scale and an automatic
switchover unit be installed;
a new alarm system needs to
be added to the controls in the
event of well pump failure; the
existing power generator does
not have secondary contain-
ment as required and leaks,
which can potentially con-
taminate the adjacent well; a
water tower mixing system
should be added to alleviate
non-uniform distribution of
disinfectants; the distribution
system is in need of a new wa-
ter main loop to alleviate low
pressures in the northwest por-
tion of town and flushing hy-
drants are needed on dead end
water mains to improve water
quality.
The council said that it in-
tends to fund the project by
submitting an application on
or before the Nov. 14 dead-
line for $300,000 through the
CDBG Water/Sewer Fund
from the Iowa Economic De-
velopment Authority and to
fund the remaining project
costs of $635,000 with an
Iowa Department of Natural
Resources (DNR) State Re-
volving Fund loan.
At the Nov. 5 council meet-
ing, Bill Goldy briefed the city
council on what was needed to
fulfill the CDBG grant require-
ments. A motion to approve
Resolution #11/05/12-159 was
made by Penny Porter and sec-
onded by Crista Jensen, with
a roll call vote of approval by
Penny Porter, Crista Jensen
and Tom Collins. Aaron Cra-
han voted not in favor of the
resolution to approve the sub-
mission of the 2012 CDBG
water/sewer fund application.
Ryan Fredin was not present at
the meeting. The motion was
passed three to one.
Then a motion was made
to approve I and S Group En-
gineering contract by Penny
Porter and seconded by Crista
Jensen, with a roll call vote
of approval by Penny Por-
ter and Crista Jensen. Aaron
Crahan and Tom Collins then
voted not in favor of signing
the I and S Group Engineer-
ing contract. Ryan Fredin was
not present at the meeting. The
motion did not pass in a vote
of two to two and the project
has now been placed on hold.
The time frame to apply for the
$300,000 grant money through
the CDBG Water/Sewer Fund
from the Iowa Economic De-
velopment Authority has now
lapsed.
Then a motion was made to
approve I and S Group Engi-
neering fees for work already
done on the project and not
to exceed $11,000 by Penny
Porter and seconded by Crista
Jensen, with a roll call vote of
approval by Penny Porter and
Crista Jensen. Aaron Crahan
and Tom Collins then voted
not in favor of paying I and S
Group Engineering fees that
have been incurred at this time.
Ryan Fredin was not present at
the meeting. The motion did
not pass in a vote of two to
two.
LIVERMORE DATES AND
EVENTS TO REMEMBER
Wynona’s Holiday Open
House, Saturday, Dec. 8, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Livermore American Le-
gion Pancake Breakfast, Sun-
day, Dec. 9.
Livermore Santa Claus Day,
Saturday, Dec. 15, 10 a.m.,
Livermore American Legion.
City of Livermore Christ-
mas Lighting Contest judging,
Dec. 17 through Dec. 21.
Livermore American Legion Auxiliary Unit 415 pre-
sented awards to the following ladies, for their years of
support and service to the American Legion Auxiliary.
Pictured (l to r): Frieda Garman, 60 years, past trea-
surer; Jeannette Underberg, 48 years; and Freda Cran,
45 years, also a past president. Submitted photo.
ST. JOE CDA HOLDS
MEETING
On Nov. 7, at 6:30 p.m.,
members of Court St. Joseph
attended mass at St. Joseph
Church. Chaplain Rev. Victor
Ramaeker was the celebrant
and offered the mass for the
living and deceased members
of the Court. Rita Sue Marso
served as lector.
A dessert lunch was
served. Jane Curry received
the birthday prize. Father Ra-
maeker spoke to the group.
Regent Rita Sue Marso con-
ducted the November CDA
meeting. Due to the absence
of Jean Erpelding, Helen
Gales served as recording
secretary. Minutes of the Oc-
tober meeting were read and
approved. The group voted to
donate a gift to be raffled at the
State CDA Convention in Fort
Dodge in spring. The officers
gave their reports.
Norma Reding gave the
Round Robin report. Win-
ners in September were Mrs.
Leo Bormann and Mary Jo
St. Joe News
Kohlhaas with a score of
3,000. Coming in second
place were Joann Bormann
and Pat Becker who scored
2,720. Third place winners
were Edna Kirsch and Myrna
Thilges with 2,680. October
winners were Karen Berte and
Marlene Altman, who took
first place with 3,970. With a
score of 3,650 Edna Kirsch
and Myrna Thilges came in
second. Helen Bormann and
Helen Gales scored 3,410 and
took third place.
Christmas Charities were
planned. Betty Berte won the
half and half prize. Regent
Rita Sue announced that the
DCCW fall deanery meet-
ing would be held at St. Joe
on Nov. 17. The meeting ad-
journed at 8:30 p.m. The com-
mittee in charge of arrange-
ments for the evening included
Betty Berte, Mary Jo Kohlhaas
and Alona Berte. The Decem-
ber meeting will be a joint
meeting and Christmas party
with the Knights of Columbus
on Dec. 11.
Livermore News
Goodwill’s Ambassador
trailer is pleased to receive
donations in Rolfe, beginning
Nov. 26 to Dec. 3. Donations
are to be place in the Ambassa-
dor trailer located in the alley
between the building and the
Farmers Market poles.
Please place donations as
far inside the trailer as possi-
ble, thank you. Unfortunately
furniture and large appliances
cannot be accepted.
Donations being accepted at
Good Will trailer in Rolfe
Margie Martin and Palmer Rurup, members of the Fountain Hills, Arizona Cham-
ber of Commerce, attended a ribbon cutting for the Family Loving Dental Clinic
on Nov. 14, in Fountain Hills. Pictured above are Palmer Rurup, Margie Martin,
Fountain Hills mayor, Linda Kavangh, and Chamber of Commerce ambassador, Bill
Bumbolo. Martin and Rurup were warmly welcomed back to their winter home in
Fountain Hills, AZ. Submitted photo.
Goodwill Industries Wall
Street Mission will grate-
fully accept your donations of
clothing, usable working small
appliances, and household
goods, sporting goods, and
toys.
Your donations are pro-
cessed and sold in the Good-
will stores to support the pro-
grams and services provided
for people with disabilities and
disadvantaging conditions.
Goodwill is a non-profit
organization and through the
many programs provides ser-
vices to hundreds of people
with employment barriers.
With the help of Goodwill
they are able to receive train-
ing, which will enable them to
become productive wage earn-
ers and tax-paying members of
their communities.
All this is possible because
of your donated items.
Must be at least 21 years of age and have a
Wild Rose Player’s Club Card to attend.
Singing Comedian Impres-
sionist
Scott Record
NEW YEAR’S EVE AT WILD ROSE
Monday,
December 31, 2012
Enjoy a Fabulous Dinner and
an Unforgettable Show
for
$
20
per person
Sing
S
NE
D
DINNER MENU:
Wild Rose Salad
Roast Beef with Mashed Potatoes and Gravy
Chicken Kiev on a Bed of Wild Rice
Mixed Vegetables
Dinner Rolls
Dessert
Chocolate, Vanilla Bean and
Red Velvet Cupcakes
Two Shows: 6:30 p.m. & 9:00 p.m.
DINNER WITH SHOW TO FOLLOW
(877) 720-ROSE (7673)
www.wildroseresorts.com
E m m e t s b u r g , I o w a E m m e t s b u b u b u bbb u r g I o w a
6B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
TREES OF CHRISTMAS AT FAITH UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
The ever-popular Christmas Tree Walk
at Faith United Methodist Church in Hum-
boldt will resume for the 26
th
year on Mon-
day, Nov. 26, and will continue through
Dec. 25.
The display of trees is the result of many
ideas from groups, families and individu-
als from within the church and commu-
nity as well as from other towns in Hum-
boldt County. There will be about 125 trees
on display, each beautifully decorated.
Bus tours, school children and thousands
of visitors tour the Trees of Christmas
each year.
Faith United Methodist Church is located
on 4
th
Street between 1
st
Avenue North and
2
nd
Avenue North in Humboldt. The walk is
open every day from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and
it is recommended people arrive no later
than 7 p.m. so they can take their time
and thoroughly enjoy a peaceful walk
among the Trees of Christmas!
People coming from a distance and
large groups should call the church offi ce
at (515) 332-2083 to make sure they will be
coming at a time when they will be able to
see the entire display.
Add this walk through the Trees of
Christmas to your family’s Christmas tra-
ditions and enjoy the blessings of the sea-
son!
SCHOOL CHRISTMAS CONCERTS
Monday, Dec. 3, Humboldt 5-6 grade Win-
ter Band Concert, 7 p.m., HHS Auditorium.
Tuesday, Dec. 4, St. Mary’s School Concert,
1 p.m. and 7 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church in
Humboldt.
Thursday, Dec. 6, Gilmore City-Bradgate
K-8 Christmas Concert, 6:30 p.m., Gilmore
City School.
Thursday, Dec. 6, LuVerne Elementary
School (preschool through sixth grade)
Concert, 7 p.m., LuVerne School
Thursday, Dec. 6, Humboldt 7-8 grade
band, 6-8 chorus, Holiday Concert, 7 p.m.,
HHS Auditorium.
Monday, Dec. 10, HHS band and chorus
concert, 7 p.m., HHS Auditorium.
Thursday, Dec. 13, West Bend-Mallard/
Gilmore City-Bradgate High School Christ-
mas Concert, 7 p.m. at West Bend.
Thursday, Dec. 13, CWL grades 7-12 Con-
cert, 7 p.m. at the Corwith gym.
Monday, Dec. 17, Twin Rivers Elementary
(pre-K through fifth grade) Concert, 6:30
p.m. in the Bode gym.
Tuesday, Dec. 18, Taft Winter Concert
(grades 2-3), 7 p.m., HHS Auditorium.
KIWANIS CHRISTMASLAND
Christmasland in Humboldt will open
for the holiday season Friday, Nov. 23.
This popular holiday attraction sponsored
by the Humboldt/Dakota City Noon Ki-
wanis Club, has been visited by more than
100,000 people since its opening in 1982.
Visitors from most of the 50 U.S. states
and some foreign countries have seen the
displays. Last year there were more than
6,000 visitors to Kiwanis Christmasland.
For 2012, there are several new scenes
that were purchased featuring large
snowmen engaged in various activities.
The new displays were made possible by a
generous grant from the Humboldt Coun-
ty Community Foundation and local Noon
Kiwanis fundraisers.
Kiwanis members have also added new
insulation and shelving and repainted
some scenes for the coming year.
“We think people will be impressed with
the changes and the new scenes,” said Ki-
wanis Christmasland committee chair
Dave Lee.
Christmasland will open for the sea-
son Friday, Nov. 23, with nightly hours
through Dec. 23, from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Christmasland will also be open Saturday-
Sunday afternoons, Nov. 24-25, Dec. 1-2,
Dec. 8-9, Dec. 15-16 and Dec. 22-23 from
2:30-4:30 p.m. Christmasland will also be
open in the afternoons in the days lead-
ing up to Christmas, Dec. 20-24 from 2:30-
4:30 p.m.
Christmasland will be closed for inclem-
ent weather. The Kiwanis Club has never
charged admission to Christmasland,
however donations are appreciated as
they help the exhibit grow.
Christmasland will be open by arrange-
ment for group tours. Call Dave Lee at
(515) 890-0116 to schedule a day and time.
All school groups, nursing homes, group
homes, church groups, businesses and
civic organizations are welcome.
HOSPICE TREE OF LIFE
The Hospice Light Up a Life tree light-
ing ceremony will take place on Monday,
Nov. 26, at 7 p.m. in the Path of Life Gar-
den at Humboldt County Memorial Hospi-
tal (south side of hospital). There will be a
social hour following the ceremony in the
Sun Room of the Long Term Care Unit of
the hospital. With a minimum donation
to Hospice of Humboldt County of $10
per name, people can have a light placed
on the tree in memory of a loved one, or
in honor of someone who is of personal
significance. In addition, names will be in-
scribed in a permanent tribute book.
HILLSIDE SPECTACULAR
For the 28
th
year in a row Merlin Fort’s
hillside spectacular is sure to delight those
who see it. Located on 2
nd
Street South
in Dakota City, the display continues to
change and expand each year. Thousands
of visitors come to see the 100,000 plus
light display. Visitors can drive by or stop
and walk among the decorations for a
closer look. The lights are turned on the
night before Thanksgiving and remain on
until Jan. 1.
CHRISTMAS BASKET DISTRIBUTION
The Humboldt County Ministerial As-
sociation’s annual Christmas Food Basket
Distribution will take place on Tuesday,
Dec. 18, from the Humboldt County Fair-
grounds.
Baskets must be brought to the fair-
grounds between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on
Monday, Dec. 17.
Baskets can be picked up by the as-
signed people at the fairgrounds on Tues-
day, Dec. 18, between 8:30 a.m. and 3:30
p.m. Humboldt-Dakota City pick up time
is 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. All others are from
8:30 to 11 a.m.
More than 250 families in Humboldt
County enjoy a better Christmas because
of this event, which is coordinated by the
Humboldt County UDMO Outreach Offi ce.
Humboldt County UDMO has placed an
Angel Tree at the Tree Walk at Faith United
Methodist Church. It is the only location
for an Angel Tree this holiday season.
People can pick an angel, purchase and
wrap the gift, and then attach the an-
gel to the front of the package so it gets
to the right child. The package should be
returned to the Humboldt County Fair-
grounds on Monday, Dec. 17, between 10
a.m. and 6 p.m.
HUMOTA THEATRE HOLIDAY MERCHANT
SPONSORED FREE MATINEES
Noon and 2:30 p.m. on Nov. 23 and Nov.
24, and noon only on Nov. 25, “Madagas-
car 3”
Noon and 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1,
and noon only on Sunday, Dec. 2, “Rio.”
Noon and 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8,
and noon only on Sunday, Dec. 9, “Ice Age:
Continental Drift.”
Noon and 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec.
15, and noon only on Sunday, Dec. 16, Dr.
Suess’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.”
Noon and 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec.
22, and noon only on Sunday, Dec. 23, “Ar-
thur Christmas.”
Free tickets are available from any of
the sponsoring merchants including: ADF
Systems, B and B Sales and Service, Bank
Iowa, Chantland-MHS Company, Chant-
land Company, Cindy’s Chiropractic Cen-
ter, Computer Works and Vinyl Signs, Dod-
gen Industries/Born Free, Edward Jones,
Erpelding, Voigt and Co., Fareway, Farm
Bureau Financial Services, First State Bank,
Floral Creations, Goldfield Access Network,
Hardee’s/Red Burrito, Harmon Animal
Clinic, Health Source of Humboldt, Hjemel-
and Flooring, Humboldt Mutual Insurance,
Humboldt Newspapers, Humboldt Veteri-
nary Clinic, Hy-Vee, Jensen Trailers, Larry’s
Pharmacy, NorthPark Family Dentistry,
Northwest Bank, Pasquale’s Italian Restau-
rant, Seiler Appliance Service, Lee Smith’s
State Farm Agency, Sheree’s Hallmark,
Springvale Salon on Main, Thompson Real
Estate, Insurance and Financial Services, V
and S Variety, Wally’s Iron Works, Dr. Kirk
Whittlesey and Yacht Club Trailers.
ADDITIONAL HOLIDAY EVENTS
KIWANIS SPAGHETTI DINNER
The annual Humboldt 7 O’Clock Kiwanis
Spaghetti Dinner will be held on Monday,
Dec. 3, from 5-7 p.m. at the Legion base-
ment on Sumner Avenue in Humboldt.
Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for chil-
dren 12 and under.
GEMUTLICHKEIT DINNER
The annual Gemutlichkeit (German)
Dinner will be held on Saturday, Dec. 1,
from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Zion Lutheran
Church in Humboldt. The dinner features
pork loin, brats and sauerkraut, hot Ger-
man potato salad, potato soup, home-
made bread, beet, dill and cinnamon pick-
les, deviled eggs, fruit soup, lebkuchen,
pfeffernusse and springerle cookies, black
forest torte, coffee, water or milk. Ticket
prices are $10 for adults, $5 for children
under 10, with preschoolers free.
COOKIE WALK, ORGAN CONCERT
Congregational United Church of
Christ of Humboldt will host a cookie
walk on Saturday, Dec. 8, from 9-11 a.m.
and their annual organ Christmas Con-
cert on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 2 p.m.
Get in the Holiday Spirit all
around Humboldt
and Dakota City!
TR
ME
T
at
bol
day
Dec
T
ide
als
ABENS-MARTY-CURRAN-AGENCY
HUMBOLDT MUTUAL INS. ASSOCIATION
513 Sumner Ave. • Humboldt
515-332-2953
Hwy. 169 South • Humboldt • 515-332-4040
Humboldt Downtown/Motor Bank • Gilmore City
www.bankiowabanks.com
Member FDIC
FARM BUREAU
INSURANCE
Career Agents: Doug Bacon and Kent Mueller
401 13th St. S. • Humboldt • 515-332-1122
A FAMILY OF FINANCIAL PLANNING SERVICES
®
1301 6th Ave. North, Humboldt
515-604-6420
Downtown Humboldt
515-332-1102 • M-F 9-5:30, Sat. 9-1
Rick cell 515-368-1908 • Ron cell 515-368-0729
1112 20th Street North • P.O. Box 543
Humboldt, IA 50548 • 515-332-4014
IOWA TREE SERVICE
Trimming • Removal • Stump Grinding
Insured - Free Estimates
Goldfield • 515-825-3440 • Cell: 515-851-0035
Jim & Nicky Kvale “The customer is our priority”
“PROFESSIONAL CLIMBERS”
members of Iowa and International Society Arborist Associations
HUMBOLDT CARE CENTERS
and SENIOR LIVING SUITES
SOUTH CARE CENTER
800 13th St. S. • Humboldt • 515-332-4104
NORTH CARE CENTER
1111 11th Ave. N. • Humboldt • 515-332-2623
Quality First
PHARMACY, BAKERY & DELI DEPARTMENTS
Hwy. 3 East • Humboldt • 515-332-1498
JOHN’S
SHELL SERVICE
Hwy. 169 • Humboldt
515-332-5127
K.C. NIELSEN, LTD.
Hwy. 3 E. • Humboldt
515-332-2545
MASON • LINDHART
FUNERAL HOME
Lincoln and Dawn Mason
MS & SONS CORP.
We Buy Corn Cobs
FULL LINE TRUCK AND TRAILER REPAIR
Car, Truck & Farm Tires • Truck Wash and Acidizing
1605 Sassy Lane • Humboldt • 515-332-3303
Tire Shop – 515-332-3093
801 Sumner Ave. • Humboldt
332-1840
MEMBER
FDIC
SpringVale Farm
Bob and Lonnie Larson
2603 Lone Tree Road, Humboldt
515.332.4793 • email: bllarson@humrec.com
SATERN’S
SERVICE CENTER
515-332-2793 • Humboldt
VINNY’S BBQ
Dakota City
515.332.2046
Carry outs available
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS!
WORTHINGTON INSURANCE
WORTHINGTON REAL ESTATE
9 5th St. N. • Humboldt
515-332-3326
407 S. Gilmore Street • Gilmore City
515-373-6126
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 7B
Volunteers from District 10 of ABATE of Iowa gathered at the Humboldt County Fairgrounds on the evening
of Nov. 14 to sort hundreds of toys to be distributed throughout the 10 counties District 10 covers. District 10
Coordinator Doug Smith said many of the toys were collected during a Santa in September toy run. ABATE mem-
bers went shopping with cash that was donated, buying toys from Walmart, which in turn rebated the tax they
would’ve paid so even more toys could be purchased. Smith said ABATE members enjoy helping put a smile on
the face of a youngster on Christmas morning. The toys will be distributed to various community action groups,
such as Humboldt County UDMO, in the 10 counties to be distributed to children in need. District 10 encompasses
the following counties: Humboldt, Webster, Kossuth, Wright, Hamilton, Pocahontas, Greene, Calhoun, Palo Alto,
Emmet and part of Franklin. District 10 also distributed stuffed animals to kids along the Lighted Holiday Pa-
rade route in Humboldt on the evening of Nov. 17, and at the Lights at Kennedy event at Fort Dodge the next
night. Humboldt Independent photo.
For the fourth year churches in the Humboldt area have been taking part in Operation Christmas Child, a
project of Franklin Graham, President of Samaritan’s Purse of Boone, NC. People from across the United States
filled shoe boxes with toys, school supplies, tooth paste, tooth brushes and more from the last week of October
until the middle of November. All of the boxes collected go to Storm Lake, an area collection site, and then on to a
regional collection site in Sioux Falls, SD. They end up in Minneapolis where they are loaded on a plane, destined
for a third world country to make Christmas more joyful and meaningful for hundreds of boys and girls. Some of
the volunteers pictured with the boxes include (l to r): Kathy Nokleby, Janelle Lowe, Judy Gronbach, Barb Ad-
ams, Dalia Adams, Romaine Lee, Jane Trauger and Ray Husted. Gary Goetsch and Mike Pedersen also assisted.
Since 1993, more than 94 million boys and girls from more than 130 countries have been recipients of these shoe
box gifts. This year, Operation Christmas Child plans to reach the 100 millionth child. Humboldt Independent
photo.
The parade entry from St. Mary’s Church is pictured during the Humboldt-
Dakota City Chamber of Commerce Lighted Holiday Parade on Saturday night. See
more photos from the parade at www.humboldtnews.com.
Gardeners, both novice and
experienced, will be inspired
to preserve their garden boun-
ty with Iowa State Univer-
sity Extension and Outreach’s
2013 garden calendar. The
full-color, 12-month calendar
is filled with stunning photog-
raphy and information.
“The calendar this year is
all about home-grown food
from the garden,” said Cynthia
Haynes, ISU Extension and
Outreach horticulture special-
ist.
Each month has several gar-
dening activities and chores
listed, so homeowners can eas-
ily stay on task as they plan,
prepare for, plant and take care
of their 2013 garden.
“Some gardeners also use
the calendar as a journal to
keep notes from their garden,”
Haynes said. “We hope the
calendar provides new garden-
ers with information that helps
them improve their gardening
practices, while helping ex-
perienced gardeners find new
and different things to try.”
The back of the calendar
provides gardeners with sev-
eral tips on preserving their
garden bounty and plenty of
other Extension and Outreach
resources.
“Many people buy calen-
dars because they are very
pretty to look at,” Haynes said.
“This calendar is very visually
appealing, and it also provides
helpful hints and tips that gar-
deners can sometimes forget.
This calendar is a great re-
source.”
“Garden Bounty – 2013
Garden Calendar” (PM 0815)
is available for $6 from the
Humboldt County Extension
and Outreach office at 727
Sumner Avenue, Humboldt.
This is the 35
th
edition of the
ISU Extension and Outreach
garden calendar
Garden calendars now available
Residential Service
Must have GAN telephone service
Up to 1mbps Service - $19.95/month
Up to 2mbps Service - $29.95/month
Up to 5mbps Service - $39.95/month
536 North Main • Goldfield, IA 50542 • 515.825.3996 • Humboldt 604-1234 • goldfieldaccess.net
as low as
$
19.95/month PERIOD!
Not a temporary price!
Set-up fee 99
¢
through
November 30, 2012 (a $35.00 value!)
• GAN Telephone Service Required •
• Always on line •
Your Local, Friendly
Connection for
• Free Estimates
• Free On-Site
Consultation
• Fully Insured
• 5-yr Workmanship
Warranty
• Pre-engineered for
code laws
• Licensed ICC General
Contractor
• 3-Ply Laminated Posts
(60 yr. warranty)
• Steel Roof and Sides
(40 yr. warranty)
• 16 colors available
• 8´ o/c Post Spacing -
4´ o/c Truss Spacing
• 90 MPH Wind Load /
30lb. Truss load
• Site Preparation
available
24’ x 24’ x 8’ Garage
$7,800
800-374-6988 www.qualitystructures.com
Experience the
QSI Advantage
16’x7’ Overhead Door
One 3´ Entry Door
Prices include: DELIVERY & INSTALLATION
on your level site. Travel charges may apply.
Material Only Kits Now Available
Call for FREE
info and estimates
BIANCHI
Residential Commercial
Specializing in
Service • Sales • Installation
SERVICE ON ALL MAKES AND MODELS
15 South 17th Street • Fort Dodge
515-955-6680
“Being members of
Practical Farmers has
helped us make better
decisions on the farm.”
Tom and Irene Frantzen
NEW HAMPTON, I A
www. prac ti cal farmers. org ( 515) 232- 5661
Growi ng more t han crops. Br i ngi ng more t han f ood to t he t abl e.
8B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
St. Mary School students participated in a gift-giving project through Operation Christmas Child by donating
gift items to children living in poverty stricken areas around the world.
Operation Christmas Child is a service project that was organized by Kathy Nokleby, teachers, and students
of St. Mary School. Storage containers were filled with a variety of gifts from a suggestion list given to students in
each grade. Submitted photo.
ABATE of Iowa, District 10, handed out stuffed
animals to children along the parade route at the an-
nual Humboldt-Dakota City Chamber of Commerce
Lighted Holiday Parade on Saturday night. See more
photos from the parade at www.humboldtnews.com.
District 10 of ABATE of Iowa had a large float and handed out stuffed animals
to children along the parade route of the Humboldt-Dakota City Chamber of Com-
merce Lighted Holiday Parade on Saturday night. See more photos from the parade
at www.humboldtnews.com.
Jim Kellner’s horse drawn sleigh pulled Santa through the Humboldt-Dakota
City Chamber of Commerce Lighted Holiday Parade on Saturday night. Following
the parade, Santa greeted youngsters at the VFW in Dakota City following the pa-
rade. See more photos from the parade at www.humboldtnews.com.
By Marilyn Dodgen
In 2003, Betty and Bill Bur-
khart were spending the winter
months in Sun City, AZ, and
were introduced to a group
of men and women who met
once a week to knit and cro-
chet items that were donated to
a variety of organizations, for
distribution to those who were
in need.
Betty joined the group and
Bill went along to visit with
other spouses while the wom-
en shared their talents. One of
the men had made a knitting
loom that several were making
stocking hats on. Bill decided
that that was something he
might be able to learn how to
do.
By the time he and Betty
Harold Grebe, representing
Thrivent For Lutheran Insur-
ance, has collected the items
left over and given them where
needed. The local Head Start
and the Head Start in Fort
Dodge also receive a variety of
the caps and mittens.
Diane Jensen knits baby
items that are distributed at
the hospitals in Des Moines.
For years she has also sewn
burial shrouds for babies born
to drug addicted mothers, who
have not survived birth.
A large number were sent
over to soldiers in Kosovo and
Afghanistan to give to widows
and children. The soldiers took
pictures of the distribution and
sent them along with thanks
from the recipients.
When Bill and Betty went to
his class reunion in Missouri
Valley, the area had suffered a
lot of damage from floodwa-
ters, so they took 60 caps and
mittens to donate there.
On a trip to Santa Anna, CA,
Betty and Bill took knitted and
crocheted items with them and
attended a show where some
widow ladies were selling
things to make money for dif-
ferent causes. The items made
in Humboldt ended up being
distributed there.
The group averages around
20 workers and represents
most of the churches in the
area. It’s a close-knit organiza-
tion and they attend whenever
their schedules permit. The
group photo lists 16 members
who attended the Novem-
ber meeting. Linda Stauffer,
Cheryl Kramer and Shirley
Mitchell had to leave before
the picture was taken. Several
of the regulars were unable
to be there, including Mari-
lyn Hansen, Donna Bradley,
Judy Kunert, Richard and Bert
Zahrobsky, Ruby Nolan, Ruth
Ann Johnson, Mardell Prewitt,
Beverly Olson and Mildred
Sorlie.
Donations of yarn and mon-
ey are greatly appreciated.
Newcomers are always wel-
come. They meet at 9 a.m.,
the second Thursday of each
month except in December.
Longtime members will assure
all newcomers that they will
benefit from creating and dis-
tributing these gifts as much or
more than those who receive
them.
returned to Iowa, he had per-
fected the skill and purchased
his own loom. Betty had talked
to several women who knitted
and crocheted and that result-
ed in forming of a group that
started meeting once a month
at the Faith United Methodist
Church in Humboldt.
The original group included
Betty and Bill, Marie Mills,
Marilyn Hansen, Evelyn Wil-
ley, Sharon Philby, Marilyn
Johnson, Mildred Sorlie, Mar-
jorie Vance and Verna Ken-
nedy.
Marilyn Joiner, who does
not knit or crochet, donated
her skills at wood working and
made several looms. She has
kept a record of the colors and
number of hats she has made
and has made 1,607 so far. Her
sister, Karen Kinney, who lives
at Perry, has a loom and has
made over 1,000. She comes to
Humboldt once a year to join
the group at the church.
Others who have made caps
over the years include Joanne
Sandven, Phyllis Deppe, Ken
Nelson and Richard Zah-
robsky, of Fort Dodge. Pat
Reefer has a different style of
loom and makes scarves. A
newcomer, Shirley Reimers,
is learning to make the caps.
Most women in the group knit
or crochet personal items and
enjoy sharing ideas and ex-
changing patterns.
The group makes prayer
shawls that are given to shut-
ins and people in hospitals.
Betty said that one shawl was
given to a lady who eventually
died and her husband was so
appreciative that he has made
several donations of money
to purchase yarn for the proj-
ect. People who know of their
work also donate yarn and
money for supplies.
More items that the group
makes include baby quilts,
hats, sweaters and mittens for
newborns and adults. Mem-
bers bring their completed
items to the meetings and each
one does a “show and tell” of
their work since the last meet-
ing.
Over 1,000 items are given
away each year to organiza-
tions that include an orphanage
in Guatemala. Closer to home
are the Humboldt Women’s
Club, the Bidwell Commu-
nity Center in Des Moines, the
closet at the Perry Christian
Church, Hope Village in Car-
roll, the Domestic/Sexual As-
sault Outreach Center in Fort
Dodge, the VFW and Ameri-
can Legions in Humboldt and
Webster Counties and other
veterans groups as far away
as Michigan. In recent years,
Hats and scarves are created on special looms, shown here. Pictured (l to r): new-
comer, Shirley Reimers, Phyllis Deppe, Bill Burkhart and Marilyn Joiner.
Some of the knitters and crocheters who meet at 9 a.m., at the Faith United Meth-
odist Church the second Thursday of every month are, front row (l to r): Shirley
Reimers, Betty Burkhart, Bill Burkhart, Ellen Bauer, Ardis Day and Judy Cochran.
Second row: Gloria Strickland, Martha Schmidt and Pat Reefer. Back row: Jan
Smith, Diane Jensen, Sharon Robinson, Marilyn Joiner, Phyllis Deppe, Sharon Phil-
by and Karen Kinney, from Perry.
Group finds purpose and joy in knitting
as seen in
Order high quality
photos as seen in the
Humboldt Independent,
plus see many more
unpublished photos.
Go to www.humboldtnews.com
and click on
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 9B
NOTICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATIONAL MEETING
DOCKET NUMBER E-22104
Humboldt County, Iowa
MidAmerican Energy Company (MidAmerican or Company), a public utility with its principal place of business at 666 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 50309, is proposing to construct a 345,000 volt
(345 kV) electric transmission line in Iowa from a proposed substation near 300th and Starling Avenue in O’Brien County easterly and southerly across public and private property in O’Brien County, Clay
County, Palo Alto County, Kossuth County, Humboldt County and Webster County to an existing MidAmerican substation located in Webster County.
The proposed electric transmission line corridor Humboldt County is generally depicted on the enclosed map and will use an existing 161kV line corridor as much as practical by rebuilding this into a
double circuit electric transmission line on single pole structures. This new 345 kV line will assist in providing for additional electric transmission capacity to enable new renewable generation develop-
ment, relieve congestion on the existing electric transmission system and increase electric transmission system reliability in Iowa. MidAmerican will seek easement rights from landowners for the pro-
posed line to be constructed across private property. The new easement width requested will generally be 150 feet.
In accordance with the Iowa Code, an Informational Meeting concerning this project will be held at the following time and location:
9:00 AM – December 6, 2012
Humboldt County Fairgrounds
311 6th Avenue North - Humboldt, IA 50548
As a landowner or a party in possession of, or residing on property, affected by the location and construction of said electric transmission line, you have the right to be present at the Informational
Meeting mentioned above.
You also have the right to file with the Iowa Utilities Board, 1375 E. Court Street, Room 69, Des Moines, Iowa 50319-0069, objections to the location and construction of the proposed line as described.
A representative of the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) will preside over this Informational Meeting and will distribute and review a statement of the legal rights of landowners as required by law. Qualified
representatives of MidAmerican will also be at the meeting to discuss the project and answer your questions.
Persons with disabilities requiring assistive services or devices to observe or participate should contact the IUB at (515) 725-7300 in advance of the scheduled date to request that appropriate arrange-
ments be made.
Following the meeting, right-of-way personnel from the Company will begin contacting landowners to purchase voluntary easements. Later, the Company will file a petition for a franchise by county
with the IUB for permission to build the electric line and, if necessary, will request the right of eminent domain (condemnation) on property where voluntary easements have not been obtained. The IUB
decides whether to approve or deny the franchise through a hearing process. The IUB's decision is based on the record created at that hearing.
The duty of the IUB is to determine if the proposed electric line promotes the public convenience and necessity and meets the other requirements of Iowa law and IUB rules that apply. The IUB may
appoint an administrative law judge to preside over the hearing and issue a proposed decision. The administrative law judge's decision will become the final decision of the IUB unless appealed to the
IUB by a party to the case within the time limit provided for in the proposed decision. When the IUB has decided the case, either initially or on appeal from the administrative law judge's proposed deci-
sion, the IUB’s ruling may be appealed in the courts.
The IUB, in considering a petition for the right of condemnation, does so in an open and public process. If the IUB grants the right of condemnation, the Company will petition the chief judge of the
judicial district for the county involved to appoint a compensation commission. The compensation commission sets the compensation amount. The Company posts the amount of the award with the
Sheriff to be claimed by the landowner. The Company may then proceed with the work. The landowner or the Company may appeal the amount determined by the compensation commission to the
courts.
When this project is completed, the Company will meet with landowners to settle construction damages.
If in the event of inclement weather, determined by the cancellation or early dismissal of school/classes in the Humboldt School District due to weather on the date of this Information Meeting, the
meeting will be held on December 13, 2012 at 9:00 AM at this same location.
If you can not attend the meeting previously mentioned, additional meetings will be held at the following:
December 4, 2012 – 9:00 AM Hartley Community Center
820 2nd St. NE
Hartley, IA 51346
December 4, 2012 – 2:00 PM Clay County Regional Events Center
800 W. 18th Street
Spencer, IA 51301
December 5, 2012 – 2:00 PM Algona Public Library
210 N. Phillips Street
Algona, IA 50511
December 5, 2012 – 9:00 AM Iowa Lakes Community College
Auditorium 282
Entrances 3 and 4
3200 College Drive
Emmetsburg, IA 50536
December 6, 2012 – 2:00 PM Best Western Starlite Village Hotel
1518 3rd Avenue NW
Fort Dodge, IA 50501
For more information, please contact MidAmerican Energy Company at 866-950-9588.
Legals
Board of Supervisor’s Room
Courthouse
November 5, 2012
The Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, Iowa met at 8:30 a.m. on the 5th day of November, 2012 with the follow-
ing members present: Christianson, Hansen, Mattes, Hett and Haverly. Absent: None.
Moved by Christianson and seconded by Mattes to approve the amended agenda for the November 5, 2012 Board meeting.
All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Hansen to approve the minutes for the October 29, 2012 Board meeting. All voting aye.
Chairman Haverly opened the meeting up for public concerns. No one was present to speak so the Board continued on
with their regular meeting.
Moved by Christianson and seconded by Mattes to authorize the Chairman to sign an Amended County Social Services
28E to add Fayette County to the County Social Services 28E Agreement. All voting aye.
Moved by Mattes and seconded by Hansen to accept and place on file the General Assistance Quarterly Report for the
quarter ended September 30, 2012. All voting aye.
Moved by Christianson and seconded by Hett to recess as the Board of Supervisors and convene as the Board of Trustees
for DD#80, Branch G, DD#114 and DD#33, Branch A. All voting aye.
Moved by Hansen and seconded by Mattes to adjourn as the Board of Trustees for Drainage and reconvene as the Board
of Supervisors. All voting aye.
Moved by Hansen and seconded by Hett to approve the posting of the sale of the Humboldt County Maintenance Shops in
Thor, Ottosen, Livermore, Bode (North) and Hardy (North) and a bare lot in the city of Bradgate by sealed bids. All voting aye.
Moved by Hansen and seconded by Hett to authorize the Chairman to sign a Warranty Deed for the sale of the East 34’ of
Lot 5, Block 2 to the Town of Pioneer. All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Christianson to approve the hire of Jen Schramm as a part-time jailer at the certified rate
of $12.67/hour effective 11/5/2012. All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Hansen to authorize the Chairman to sign a Certification of Cost Allocation Plan for Cost
Advisory Services. All voting aye.
Moved by Mattes and seconded by Hansen to change the date of the next Board meeting to November 13, 2012 at 1:00
p.m. because the of the Veteran’s Day holiday. All voting aye.
Committee Reports:
Hansen – 10/30 – Farm Bureau, Des Moines
Mattes, Haverly – 10/29, 10/ 30 - Family & Community Resources, Fort Dodge
Haverly - 10/30 – Community & Family Resources, Webster City
Moved by Christianson and seconded by Hett to adjourn at 9:57 a.m. All voting aye.
Peggy J. Rice Jerry R. Haverly
Auditor Chairman
HUMBOLDT COMMUNITY
SCHOOLS
School Board Work Session
The Humboldt School Board of
Education held a Work Session at 4:30
p.m., on November 12, 2012, at the High
School Media Center with Carda, Hil-
dreth, Clark, and Berte present. Pedersen
was absent. Also present were Adminis-
trators, Ms. Westhoff, Ms. Geitzenauer,
Ms. Johnson, Mr. Bruder and Mr. Thom-
as.
President Carda called the meeting
to order at 4:30 p.m. Berte moved, Hil-
dreth seconded, approval of the meeting
agenda. Motion carried.
The Board was given a presentation
and tour of the Homeless project stu-
dents were working on regarding Nation-
al Homeless Youth Awareness Month.
The Board reviewed policies on Ob-
jectives of Buildings and Sites, Build-
ings and Sites Long Range Planning,
NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL,
OF APPOINTMENT OF
EXECUTORS, AND NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
Probate No. ESPR010759
THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF INA L. CLOWES,
DECEASED
To All Persons Interested in the Estate
of Ina L. Clowes, Deceased, who died on
or about November 3, 2012:
You are hereby notified that on the
7th day of November, 2012, the last
will and testament of Ina L. Clowes,
deceased, bearing date of the 10th day
of May, 2007, was admitted to probate
in the above named court and that James
F. Clowes, Robert B. Clowes, and Anne
C. Conover, were appointed executors of
the estate. Any action to set aside the will
must be brought in the district court of
said county within the later to occur of
four months from the date of the second
publication of this notice or one month
from the date of mailing of this notice
to all heirs of the decedent and devisees
under the will whose identities are rea-
sonably ascertainable, or thereafter be
forever barred.
Notice is further given that all per-
sons indebted to the estate are requested
to make immediate payment to the un-
dersigned, and creditors having claims
against the estate shall file them with the
clerk of the above named district court,
as provided by law, duly authenticated,
for allowance, and unless so filed by the
later to occur of four months from the
second publication of this notice or one
month from the date of mailing of this
notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid)
a claim is thereafter forever barred.
Dated this 7th day of November,
2012.
James F. Clowes,
Co-Executor
R.R., Box 1773,
Hermitage, MO 65668
Robert B. Clowes,
Co-Executor
5523 55th Street N.W.,
Rochester, MN 55901
NOTICE OF PROOF OF WILL,
WITHOUT ADMINISTRATION
Probate No. ESPR010760
THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF HAROLD EDWARD GREBE
DECEASED
To all persons interested in the estate
of Harold Edward Grebe, deceased, who
died on or about October 13, 2012:
You are hereby notified that on No-
vember 6, 2012, the Last Will and Tes-
tament of Harold Edward Grebe, bear-
ing the date of December 8, 1983, was
admitted to probate in the above-named
court and there will be no present ad-
ministration of the estate. Any action
to set aside the Will must be brought in
the District Court of the above County
within the later to occur of four months
from the date of the second publication
of this Notice or one month from the date
of mailing of this Notice to the surviving
spouse and all heirs of the decedent and
devisees under the Will whose identities
are reasonably ascertainable, or thereaf-
ter be forever barred.
Dated this 6th day of November,
2012.
Janelle Groteluschen,
Clerk of Court
Robert E. Lee,
AT#0004664
Attorney for Estate,
Arends and Lee
P.O. Box 644
Humboldt, IA 50548
Date of second publication: 22nd day
of November, 2012.
I-26-2
NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S
LEVY AND SALE
IOWA DISTRICT COURT
Court Case #EQCV017993
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
SPECIAL EXECUTION
STATE OF IOWA
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
ss
BANK OF AMERICA, NA, AS
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP
Plaintiff
vs.
HAROLD SCHNETTER AND
DEBERAH SCHNETTER,
CAPITAL ONE BANK
Defendant
As a result of the judgment rendered
in the above referenced court case, an
execution was issued by the court to the
Sheriff of this county. This execution or-
dered the sale of the defendants real es-
tate to satisfy the judgment. The property
to be sold is described below:
1152 170th Street
Bradgate, IA 50520
A tract of land beginning at the North
Quarter Corner of Section Eight (8),
in Township Ninety-Two (92) North,
Range Thirty (30), West of the 5th P.M.,
Humboldt County, Iowa; Thence due
East along the North line of the North-
east Quarter of Said Section 8, 191.7
feet; Thence South 0” 25’ West 283.3
feet; Thence South 89° 06’ West 191.7
Feet; Thence North 0° 24’ East 286.1
feet along the West line of the North half
of the Northeast Quarter of said Section
8 to the point of beginning. Said Parcel
Contains 1.25 acres, more or less, inclu-
sive of 0.13 acres, more or less, of pres-
ently established highways.
Note: The North Line of the North-
east Quarter of Section 8-92-30 is as-
sumed to be a true East-West Line.
The described property will be of-
fered for sale at public auction for cash
only as follows:
DATE OF SALE: January 8, 2013
TIME OF SALE: 9 a.m.
PLACE OF SALE: Humboldt County
Law Enforcement Center, 430 Sumner
Avenue, Humboldt, IA 50548.
This sale not subject to redemption.
Judgment in the amount of
$56,734.25 with accruing interest of
$9,068.15; and interest of $3,126.62,
at 6.25 percent from February 2, 2012;
$3,536.13 costs and all other legal costs
accruing by virtue of this writ.
Building and Sites Surveys, Educational
Specifications for Buildings and Sites,
Site Acquisition, Bids and Awards for
Construction Contracts, Maintenance
Schedule, Requests for Improvements,
Emergency Repairs, Capital Assets,
Capital Assets Regulation, Capital As-
sets Management System Definitions,
Buildings and Sites Adaptation For Per-
sons With Disabilities, Vandalism, and
Energy Conservation. Use of Informa-
tion Resources Regulation policy will be
tabled until the January Work Session.
The board was informed that Taft
Elementary was nominated for the Blue
Ribbon Schools in Iowa.
Mr. Thomas discussed adding a girls’
soccer program in the spring contingent
upon numbers.
Superintendent Darling discussed the
28E Agreement with the city on the soc-
cer field (old football field), Humboldt
will have a 5 percent ELL contract with
Twin Rivers, Sharing of technology with
Twin Rivers being reviewed, discussed
Technology Plan, and the 4 way stop and
speed limit is being assessed.
Ms. Westhoff reported on the School
District Databases of JMC, Power
School and Infinite Campus and dis-
cussed the pros and cons for each.
Superintendent Darling discussed the
facility plan for next school year.
The Board reviewed the agenda for
the Regular Board Meeting on Monday,
November 19, 2012.
Board and Superintendent annual re-
view of goals were tabled until the Janu-
ary Work Session.
Berte moved, Hildreth seconded, the
meeting be adjourned. The meeting ad-
journed at 6:32 p.m.
Trina Carda, President
Rhiannon Lange, Secretary
I-27-1
Dated: November 13, 2012
Dean A. Kruger,
Humboldt County Sheriff
I-27-2
Anne C. Conover,
Co-Executor
4356 Morelia Court,
Fair Oaks, CA 95628
Gregory H. Stoebe,
ICIS PIN No: AT0007531
Attorney for Executors,
Stoebe Law Office
P.O. Box 604
Humboldt, IA 50548
Date of second publication: 22nd day
of November, 2012.
I-26-2
Legals
10B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
Board of Supervisor’s Room
Courthouse
November 13, 2012
The Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, Iowa met at 1:00 p.m. on the 13th day of November, 2012 with the following
members present: Christianson, Hansen, Mattes, Hett and Haverly. Absent: None.
Moved by Hansen and seconded by Mattes to approve the amended agenda for the November 13, 2012 Board meeting. All
voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Christianson to approve the minutes for the November 5, 2012 Board meeting. All voting
aye.
Chairman Haverly opened the meeting up for public concerns. No one was present to speak so the Board continued on with
their regular meeting. All voting aye.
Moved by Hansen and seconded by Christianson to recess as the Board of Supervisors and convene as the Board of Trustees
for DD#20. All voting aye.
Moved by Hansen and seconded by Hett to adjourn as the Board of Trustees for Drainage and reconvene as the Board of
Supervisors. All voting aye.
Moved by Hansen and seconded by Mattes to approve Voucher #2 to Weidemann, Inc. in the amount of $1,456.38 for work
completed on Project #LC-191805. All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Christianson to approve Voucher #3 to Peterson Contractors, Inc. in the amount of $6,217.70
for work completed on Project #LC-192705. All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Christianson to approve work in the right of way from Jensen Drainage on behalf of Norman
Olson for tile work connecting to a district main on DD#103 along the north line of Section 21 in Delana Township. All voting
aye.
Moved by Christianson and seconded by Hansen to approve a quote from Electronic Specialties to update the radios to nar-
row band capability for Secondary Roads. All voting aye.
Moved by Mattes and seconded by Christianson to set the date and time at 10:00 a.m. on November 19, 2012 for a public
hearing and receipt of bids for the sale of Humboldt County Maintenance Shops. All voting aye.
Moved by Mattes and seconded by Hett to give Brad Leckrone approval to advertise for the position of a Service Coordinator
for County Social Services for the 3 county area. All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Mattes to recess as the Board of Supervisors and convene as the Board of Canvassers for the
purpose of canvassing the votes cast for various federal, state and county offices at the November 6, 2012 General Election. All
voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Mattes to rescind the previous motion. All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Mattes to approve claims in the amount of $148,985.69 and Drainage claims in the amount
of $103,596.98 as per the attached schedule and the County Auditor be and hereby is instructed to issue warrants on the several
funds as allowed in the amount specified in payment of same.
3 A & A Heating & Cooling Repairs 631.70
1 Access Systems Leasing Copier 441.99
1 Airgas North Central Supplies 23.40
1 American Legion Rent 175.00
1 Apex Companies, LLC Monitoring 1,086.25
3 Arnold Motor Supply Parts 128.51
1 Ayres, Janell Mileage 37.00
1 Ayres, Merle Election Official 91.75
1 Bancroft, Jay Election Official 152.63
1 Barker, Bob Co. Inc. Supplies 93.04
1 Barnes, Marilyn A. Election Official 127.88
1 Bode Public Library Allocation 3,026.86
2 Boone Valley Implement, Inc. Parts, Supplies 501.70
1 Brown Supply Co. Inc. Supplies 112.50
1 Brown Supply Co., Inc. Repairs: DD #80 171.86
4 Card Services Postage, Supplies 717.08
1 Carlson, Mary Election Official 177.25
1 Carlson, Shirley Election Official 180.25
1 Carpenter Uniform Company Uniforms 247.20
1 CDW Government, Inc. Equipment 785.55
1 Central Iowa Distributing Supplies 216.35
5 CenturyLink Services 618.44
1 Chaffee County Sheriff Service of Papers 42.00
1 Cintas Supplies 9.05
1 Clowes, Jerilyn Election Official 156.75
1 Computer Works & Vinyl Signs Supplies 69.95
1 County Case Management Service Training 299.50
1 CRA Payment Center Parts 681.02
1 Dahl, Mary Election Official 162.50
2 Dakota City Postmaster Postage 1,228.00
2 Dakota City, City of Utilities 138.99
1 DAMEG, Inc. Medical Examiner 100.00
1 Davis, Lois Election Official 172.75
1 Day, Karen Election Official 202.75
3 De Lage Landen Copier Lease 319.29
1 Doolittle Oil Co., Inc. Supplies 113.80
1 Dorhout, Loretta Election Official 149.75
1 Eck, Kathy Election Official 180.38
1 Edge, Blythe Election Official 166.50
1 Edler, Sandra Election Official 180.75
1 Electrical Advantage Inc. Repairs 49.00
1 EmergiTech, Inc. Maintenance 5,625.00
1 Ersland, Patty Election Official 173.25
1 Fallesen, Linda Mileage 192.00
1 Fareway Supplies 249.60
1 Fastenal Company Supplies 146.62
1 Fevold, Marilyn Election Official 92.75
1 Fevold, Mary L. Election Official 60.75
1 Fisher Welding, Inc. Parts 878.92
1 Fisher, Raymond Transportation 23.00
1 Fort Dodge Machine & Supply Supplies 1.28
1 Fort, Bill Election Assistance 203.00
1 Foster's Frame & Align. Repairs 39.65
1 Fowler, Veronica Election Official 188.50
1 G & K Services Supplies 115.34
1 Gilliland, John Election Official 176.13
1 Gilmore City, City of Utilities 162.76
10 Goldfield Access Network Services 1,791.54
1 Goldfield Telephone Services 119.12
1 Harklau, Jeff Election Official 148.50
1 Henrichs, Joanne Election Official 157.38
1 Hill, Pat Election Official 235.16
1 Hjelmeland, Jan Excavating Repairs: DD #80 Br. G 2,187.62
1 Homerding, Valerie Election Official 180.88
1 Humboldt Cleaners Services 236.50
1 Humboldt Co. Assessor Supplies 48.98
1 Humboldt Co. Auditor Safety Reimbursement 542.64
1 Humboldt Co. Secondary Roads Services 501.15
1 Humboldt Co. Sheriff Service of Papers 783.40
1 Humboldt Homes, Ltd. Rent 1,145.00
2 Humboldt Independent Notices, Renewal 1,224.34
2 Humboldt Motor Sales Inc. Repairs 789.47
4 Humboldt Office Supply Supplies 1,137.48
2 Humboldt Postmaster Postage 328.20
2 Humboldt Reminder Notices 539.83
2 Humboldt, City of Utilities 137.22
1 Hy-Vee Accounts Receivable Supplies 1,867.70
2 IA State Sheriff's & Dep. Assn. Dues, Training 400.00
1 IAAO Membership 175.00
1 IDALS-Pesticide Bureau License 30.00
1 Iowa County Attorneys Assn. Training 50.00
1 Iowa Drainage District Assn. Training 40.00
2 Iowa State Assn. of Counties Training 390.00
1 Jack's OK Tire Service Supplies 947.42
1 JCL Solutions Supplies 537.32
2 John's NAPA Supplies 165.47
1 Johnson, Marlys Election Official 170.88
1 Johnson, Mary Ann Election Official 149.50
1 K.C. Nielsen Ltd. Parts 202.70
1 Kaeser Blair, Inc. Supplies 333.25
1 KHBT Notices 24.00
1 Kinseth, Ramona J. Election Official 187.00
1 Kirchhoff, Bertha Election Official 184.25
1 Kuehnast, Marilyn Election Official 183.25
1 Lakin, Chad Services 377.50
1 Lane, Marilyn Election Official 200.25
1 Lanning, Ronald Election Official 144.38
1 Larson, Denise Services 150.00
1 Lee, Sandra K. Election Official 239.13
2 Livermore, City of Utilities 210.84
1 Lyle Signs, Inc. Supplies 28.88
1 MAC Tools Tools 112.33
1 Mail Services, LLC Supplies 277.88
1 Malloy, William C. Mileage 42.00
1 Marriott Hotel Training 259.84
1 Marso Excavating Co. Repairs: DD #6 19,405.00
1 Martin Marietta Aggregates Roadstone 30,005.13
1 Marvin, Charlotte Election Official 144.88
1 Matt Parrott/Story Kenworthy Supplies 133.77
1 Mattes, Carl Training, Mileage 378.50
1 MC & E/Election Source Supplies 32.01
1 McKee, Margaret I. Election Official 158.50
1 Mediacom Services 66.57
2 Menards Supplies, Equipment 729.11
1 Messenger Notices 41.00
1 Mid Country Machinery, Inc. Parts 230.07
14 MidAmerican Energy Utilities 2,320.44
1 MS & Sons Corp. Supplies 923.70
1 Murphy Tractor & Equip. Co. Supplies 721.39
1 Nelson, Anne E. Election Official 235.75
1 Nickell, Norma Election Official 156.75
1 Nickles, Myrna Election Official 165.13
2 O.K. Tire Store, Inc. Repairs 112.40
1 Office Depot Supplies 53.95
1 Ottosen, Town of Allocation 1,000.00
1 Passow, Joeleen Election Official 149.50
4 Pederson, Nels Co., Inc. Repairs: DD#9-192, #111, Humb-Web 4-59 23,052.50
1 Peterson Contractors, Inc. Repairs 6,217.70
1 Peterson, Janice Election Official 201.50
1 Pocahontas Co. Health Dept. Services-Mileage 5,421.15
1 Pro Cooperative Fuel 1,503.02
1 Public Safety Fund Allocation 21,645.83
1 Ramaekers, Chris Election Assistance 50.25
2 Rice, Peggy J. Mileage, Postage, Provisions 142.39
1 Rice, Russell Election Assistance 27.75
1 Rusher, Darrell Rent 395.00
1 Rutland, City of Utilities 762.00
2 Sande Construction Inc. Repairs, Supplies 1,862.93
2 Satern Service Center, LLC Repairs 509.45
1 Schultz, Joyce Election Official 119.25
1 Sexe, Cherese Mileage 116.00
1 Shiflett, Dave Rent 450.00
2 Shoppers Supply Supplies 2,118.27
1 Smith, Geraldine, K. Election Official 169.25
3 Solutions Data Processing 6,901.62
1 Spencer Steel L.L.C. Repairs, Supplies 509.76
2 Star Energy Fuel 4,557.12
1 Stratford Gravel, Inc. Rock 827.85
1 Syntex Industries Inc. Postage 9.63
1 Terry's Saw Service Repairs 19.50
1 Thul, Verla Election Official 190.38
2 U.S. Cellular Services 79.46
1 Upper Des Moines Opportunity Allocation 2,000.00
1 VanGorp, Richard Election Assistance 74.25
1 Vaughn DeLoss Construction Repairs: DD #114 58,680.00
1 Verizon Wireless Telephone 155.31
1 Video Concepts Services Services: DD #126 100.00
1 Vitzthum Electric Repairs 502.24
1 Von Bokern Associates, Inc. Services 3,000.00
1 W & H Coop Supplies 28.90
1 Warner, Alice Mental Health Advocate 391.91
1 Watson & Ryan, P.L.C. Services 1,659.00
2 Webster-Calhoun Coop Services 188.68
1 Weidemann, Inc. Box Culvert 1,456.38
1 West Des Moines Marriott Training 110.88
1 Zabel, Barbara Election Official 197.25
1 Zeman, Eleanor Election Official 186.00
1 Ziegler, Inc. Parts, Labor 802.19
All voting aye.
Moved by Hett and seconded by Mattes to recess as the Board of Supervisors and convene as the Board of Canvassers for the
purpose of canvassing the votes cast for various federal, state and county offices at the November 6, 2012 General Election. All
voting aye.
After canvassing the returns it was moved by Hansen and seconded by Hett that the Board determined the votes cast as fol-
lows:
OFFICE CANDIDATE VOTES
President and Vice President Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan 3,099
Barack Obama /Joe Biden 1,972
Virgil Goode/James Clymer 11
Jill Stein/Cheri Honkala 13
Gary Johnson/James P. Gray 23
Gloria LaRiva/Stephanie Beacham 2
James Harris/Alyson Kennedy 2
Jerry Litzel/Jim Litzel 7
Scattering 29
United States Representative Steve King 2,958
District 4 Christie Vilsack 1,983
Martin James Monroe 132
State Representative –District 10 Tom W. Shaw 3,994
Scattering 55
Board of Supervisors – District 1 Harlan G. Hansen 878
Scattering 13
Board of Supervisors – District 3 Rick Pedersen 737
Scattering 9
Board of Supervisors – District 4 Randy R. Foth 397
John Christianson 569
Scattering 1
Board of Supervisors – District 5 Jerry R. Haverly 710
Scattering 27
County Auditor Peggy J. Rice 4,426
Scattering 21
County Sheriff Dean A. Kruger 4,578
Scattering 40
County Attorney (Vacancy) Jonathan Beaty 4,088
Scattering 36
Avery Township Trustee Martin Brown 57
(Elect two) Bob Dickey 5
Beaver Township Trustee Dale R. Thompson 87
(Elect two) Dave Torkelson 114
Scattering 3
Corinth Township Trustee G. Marvin Lindemann 160
(Elect two) Phillip Naeve 2
Scattering 1
Delana Township Trustee Clifford Helland 68
(Elect 2) Norman Olson 64
Grove Township Trustee Robert A. Johnson 96
(Elect two) Will Spellmeyer 113
Humboldt Township Trustee Bruce Foth 2
(Elect two) Jim Halsrud 1
Lake Township Trustee Bob Rasmussen 4
(Elect two) Rick Nervig 2 (By lot)
Scattering 3
Norway Township Trustee Clayton Hansen 87
(Elect two) Mark W. Holtan 88
Scattering 1
Rutland Township Trustee Mike Ludwig 119
(Elect two) Steve Gregory 134
Vernon Township Trustee William A. Nielsen 42
(Elect two) Roger Schipull 55
Wacousta Township Trustee Calvin Haug 3
(Elect two) Tom Jacobson 2 (By lot)
Scattering 5
Weaver Township Trustee Rodney Ahlrich 44
(Elect two) Randy Davis 46
Weaver Township Clerk Andrew Pedersen 1 (By lot)
Vacancy (Elect One) Scattering 3
County Hospital Board of Trustees Timothy P. Anderson 3,131
(Elect 3) Rodney Lee Harklau 3,156
Scott Curran 3,380
Scattering 28
County Soil & Water Conservation Robert Lynch 2,984
District Commissioner Tim Terwilliger 3,134
(Elect 3) Pat Hill 3,144
Scattering 20
County Soil & Water Conservation Max Redenius 3,606
District Commissioner Vacancy Ken Day 3
(Elect 2) Scattering 64
County Agricultural Extension Larry Lane 2,513
Council Dee Diana Stern 1,628
(Elect 4) Jeffery R. Goodell 2,456
Jenna Bormann 2,196
Scattering 18
County Agricultural Extension Will Spellmeyer 3,544
Council Vacancy (Elect 1) Scattering 13
Gilmore City Councilmember Cleo Boles 14
(Elect 1) Denny Davis 56
Tim Smith 59
Livermore City Councilmember Crista Jensen 98
(Elect 1) George McMahon 61
Scattering 8
Retention of Judges – Supreme Court Edward Mansfield Yes 2,671
No 955
Thomas D. Waterman Yes 2,713
No 970
David S. Wiggins Yes 1,779
No 2,469
Bruce B. Zager Yes 2,611
No 968
Retention of Judges – Court of Appeals Michael R. Mullins Yes 2,710
No 739
Mary Ellen Tabor Yes 2,652
No 773
Anuradha Vaitheswaran Yes 2,368
No 1,027
Retention of Judges – District 2B Steven J. Oeth Yes 2,617
No 798
Dale E. Ruigh Yes 2,604
No 803
Kurt John Stoebe Yes 3,540
No 659
Kurt L. Wilke Yes 2,882
No 752
Retention of Judges – Associate Judges Paul B. Ahlers Yes 2,648
District 2B No 742
Angela L. Doyle Yes 2,690
No 742
Lawrence E. Jahn Yes 2,606
No 771
Kim M. Riley Yes 2,670
No 722
All voting aye.
Moved by Christianson and seconded by Mattes to adjourn as the Board of Canvassers and reconvene as the Board of Supervi-
sors. All voting aye.
Committee Reports:
Christianson, Hansen – 11/5 - LEC
Mattes, Haverly – 11/5 – Community & Family Resources, Webster City
Hett – 11/8 – Humboldt County Development Association
Haverly – 11/5 – Community Social Services Board
Moved by Hett and seconded by Hansen to adjourn at 4:36 p.m. All voting aye.
Peggy J. Rice Jerry R. Haverly
Auditor Chairman
Legals
Thursday, November 22, 2012 The Humboldt Independent 11B
COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS
City of Dakota City
Dakota City, Iowa
The Dakota City Council met in regu-
lar session on November 14, 2012, at the
Dakota City Municipal Building.
Mayor Don Faltinson called the meet-
ing to order at 7 p.m. Clerk Berry took
roll call with Barb Nelson, Roger Lin-
deman, Justin Kirchhoff, Billy Fort and
Tim Myers present.
Citizens Kevin Thilges and Agnes
Fouarge, property owner Gary Vinsand,
Bill Goldy and Curt Wiseman with I and
S Group, Alex Solsma - KHBT, Kent
Thompson - Humboldt Independent,
employee D. Smith, JR Schnetzer and
Clerk Berry were present. Fifth grade es-
say winners Sierra Boge, Joshua Meyer,
Claire Varangkounh were also present
with their families.
Motion by Nelson, seconded by Lin-
deman, to approve the agenda, clerks
report, minutes as presented and pay all
bills, as funds become available. Roll
Call. All ayes. Motion carried.
November Bills
Access Systems Leasing, Copier
Lease .....................................$151.89
Ag Source Laboratories, Lab ....1,504.00
American Water Works Assoc.,
Membership Renewal .............204.00
Angelique Berry, Travel and
School .....................................216.94
Blacktop Service, Asphalt .......24,553.24
Brown Supply, Manhole Lids ......368.10
Casey’s General Store, Gas ..........258.85
CNH Capital, Snowplow Parts .......52.72
Custom Made Products, CDL
Training ...................................200.00
Data Technologies, Inc., License/
Support Fee ..........................1,769.23
Di Mar Construction Final
Payment .............................47,608.74
Dick Collins Construction, Housing
Payment ...............................6,386.00
Dream Carriage Rides, WWTP Open
House ......................................200.00
Easy Livin’ Lawn Care, Broadleaf
Application..............................145.00
EFTPS, Fed./FICA Tax .............3,169.25
Goldfield Access Network, Phone and
Internet ....................................180.80
Hawkins, Chlorine/Phosphate ...1,030.30
Holiday Airport Inn, IMFOA Fall
Conference ..............................183.68
Humb./Dakota City Chamber, Essay/
Dues/Donation .....................1,165.00
HCMH, Drug Screening ................23.00
Humboldt Independent, Legal
Publications .............................183.87
Humboldt Office Supply,
Envelopes ..................................10.79
Humboldt Reminder, Legal
Publications .............................149.10
Hy-Vee Food Store, WWTP Open
House ........................................83.34
Iowa One Call, Locates ..................21.60
Iowa Rural Water Assoc. Membership
Dues ........................................200.00
IPERS, IPERS ...........................2,031.33
John’s NAPA, Mower Parts ..........124.40
J.R. Schnetzer, Travel
Reimbursement .........................12.59
Marshall and Swift, Uniforms ........95.05
MidAmerican Energy, Service ..2,071.05
Mosquito Control of Iowa, Mosquito
Spraying ...............................2,360.00
MSA Professional Services, Housing
Engineering ........................10,800.00
NW Iowa League of Cities, Dues ..25.00
Postmaster, Postage ......................212.76
R and J Williams Inc., Housing
Payment .............................24,091.00
Sande Construction and Supply,
Recycling/Park/Water .............595.83
Shoppers Supply, Equipment/Water
Parts ..........................................36.68
St. Lukes Center for Occ. Health, Drug
Screening New Hire ..................37.00
Storey Kenworthy, Office
Supplies ...................................148.94
Treasurer State of Iowa, Withholding
NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S
LEVY AND SALE
IOWA DISTRICT COURT
Court Case #EQCV017931
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
SPECIAL EXECUTION
STATE OF IOWA
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
ss
U.S. BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE STRUCTURED ASSET
INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST,
2006-1
Plaintiff
vs.
DANNIEL J. HILL AKA DANIEL J.
HILL, NICHOLE L. HILL,
HOMEWARD, INC., AND PARTIES
IN POSSESSION
Defendant
As a result of the judgment rendered
in the above referenced court case, an
execution was issued by the court to the
Sheriff of this county. This execution or-
dered the sale of the defendants real es-
tate to satisfy the judgment. The property
to be sold is described below:
517 North Ann Street
Thor, IA 50591
A tract of land situated in Humboldt
County, Iowa described as follows, To
Wit: Commencing at a point two (2) rods
West and twenty-two (22) rods South of
the Northeast Corner of the Southeast
Quarter of Section 17, in Township 91
North, Range 27, West of the 5th P.M.;
thence running West 10 rods; thence
South 112 feet; thence East 10 rods,
thence North 112 feet, to the point of the
beginning.
The described property will be of-
fered for sale at public auction for cash
only as follows:
DATE OF SALE: January 8, 2013
TIME OF SALE: 9 a.m.
PLACE OF SALE: Humboldt County
Law Enforcement Center, 430 Sumner
Avenue, Humboldt, IA 50548.
This sale not subject to redemption.
Judgment in the amount of
$66,833.12 with accruing interest of
$763.56; and interest of $1,932.48, at 2
percent from July 27, 2011; $4,128.92
costs and all other legal costs accruing
by virtue of this writ.
Dated: November 14, 2012
Dean A. Kruger,
Humboldt County Sheriff
I-27-2
NOTICE OF PROBATE OF WILL,
OF APPOINTMENT OF
EXECUTOR, AND NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
Probate No. ESPR010761
THE IOWA DISTRICT COURT
HUMBOLDT COUNTY
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF OPAL SCHMANKE,
DECEASED
To All Persons Interested in the Estate
of Opal Schmanke, Deceased, who died
on or about November 4, 2012:
You are hereby notified that on the
15th day of November, 2012, the last
will and testament of Opal Schmanke
deceased, bearing date of the 13th day
of August, 1981, was admitted to probate
in the above named court and that Keith
Riley was appointed executor of the es-
tate. Any action to set aside the will must
be brought in the district court of said
county within the later to occur of four
months from the date of the second pub-
lication of this notice or one month from
the date of mailing of this notice to all
heirs of the decedent and devisees under
the will whose identities are reasonably
ascertainable, or thereafter be forever
barred.
Notice is further given that all per-
sons indebted to the estate are requested
to make immediate payment to the un-
dersigned, and creditors having claims
against the estate shall file them with the
clerk of the above named district court,
as provided by law, duly authenticated,
for allowance, and unless so filed by the
later to occur of four months from the
second publication of this notice or one
month from the date of mailing of this
notice (unless otherwise allowed or paid)
a claim is thereafter forever barred.
Dated this 9th day of November,
2012.
Keith Riley,
Executor of the Estate
601 NE 5th St.
Eagle Grove, IA 50533
Brian R. Johnsen,
Attorney for Executor,
Baker, Johnsen and Sandblom
30 N 8th St.,
Humboldt, IA 50548
Date of second publication: 29th day
of November, 2012.
I-27-2
COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS
City of Bode
Bode, Iowa
The Bode City Council met in regu-
taxes ........................................632.00
Trimark Centralbilling, Physical New
Hire ...........................................94.00
US Cellular, Cell Phones .............115.74
VISA-Card Services, Water Supplies
Conference ..............................468.46
Westrum Leak Detection, Leak
Detection and Survey ..............800.00
October Payroll, Payroll ..........10,734.31
Total Accounts Payable .....$145,505.58
Expenditures
General ..................................$57,530.54
Road Use Tax ..........................24,879.15
Water .........................................6,326.82
Sewer .........................................7,844.33
Recycling ..................................1,316.00
Sewer Project ..........................47,608.74
Total Expenses ...................$145,505.58
Revenues
General ..................................$90,813.97
Road Use Tax ............................6,512.30
Employee Benefits ....................6,131.19
Emergency Fund .......................1,515.30
Local Option Tax.......................5,931.56
Water .......................................14,188.57
Sewer .......................................21,343.24
Recycling ..................................1,863.62
Sewer Project ..........................47,608.74
Total Revenues ...................$195,908.49
Mayor Faltinson opened bids for sale
of 8th St. S. between 2nd Ave. and 3rd
Ave. Buyers are responsible for all legal
fees, date of sale and possession Decem-
ber 1, 2012. North 165’x80’ section,
motion by Fort, seconded by Kirchhoff,
to accept Kevin Thilges bid for $1,200.
Roll call vote. All ayes. Motion carried.
SW 165’x40’ section, motion by Nel-
son, seconded by Myers, to accept Kevin
Thilges bid for $600. Roll call vote. All
ayes. Motion carried.
SE 165’x40’, motion by Fort, second-
ed by Nelson, to accept Gary Vinsand’s
bid to trade square feet from vacated 3rd
Ave South to the East. Roll call vote. All
ayes. Motion carried.
Clerk Berry stated that Annual Fi-
nance Report has been completed and
will be published on November 15, 2012.
Mayor Faltinson welcomed the 5th
grade essay winners for the If I were
Mayor Essay contest and their families
to the council meeting. Claire Varangk-
ounh-3rd place, $15 Chamber bucks,
Joshua Meyer-2nd place, $25 Chamber
bucks, Sierra Boge-1st place, $50 Cham-
ber bucks. All winners read their essays,
were presented with certificates and
Chamber bucks from the Mayor.
Bill Goldy and Curt Wiseman with I
and S Group, Algona, presented infor-
mation regarding their engineering com-
pany.
Motion by Fort, seconded by Lin-
deman, to accept Hawkins bid for
$6,551.80 for a chlorine automatic swi-
tchover, regulator, detector, alarm and
scale. Roll call vote. All ayes. Motion
carried.
D. Smith presented his monthly re-
port, Blacktop Service will be finishing
patch work around Thanksgiving, Final
inspection report was completed by
DNR at WWTP, campground winterized.
JR completed schooling at Aeromod in
Kansas and CDL training. Clerk Berry
commented about the Holiday Lighted
Parade, Christmasland and Chamber
Discount cards.
Motion by Fort, seconded by Linde-
man, to adjourn, 7:54 p.m.
Don Faltinson, Mayor
Attest: Angelique Berry, City Clerk
As transcribed by the Clerk, subject
to Council approval.
I-27-1
lar session Monday, November 5, 2012,
at 4:30 p.m., in the council chambers.
Council members McKenna, Fulwider,
Dale, and Thilges were present; absent
Robinson. Mayor Rongved called the
meeting to order. A motion was made
by Dale, seconded by Thilges, to ap-
prove the minutes as published. All ayes,
motion carried. A motion was made by
Thilges, seconded by Dale, to approve
the agenda as posted, all ayes, motion
carried.
Todd McMahon, city maintenance,
informed the council that the panel on
the City Shed garage door, which had a
fan embedded in it, had been fixed. He
also stated the lagoon was in draw down.
A motion was made by Fulwider,
seconded by Thilges, to approve Resolu-
tion #11-2012 A Resolution to fix date of
public hearing to dispose of real estate
land owned by the City of Bode. ROLL
CALL: AYES: Fulwider, Thilges, Dale,
and McKenna. Absent: Robinson. The
following real estate to wit:
A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE
NE 1/4 OF SECTION 17; T93N;
R29W OF THE 5TH PM WITHIN
THE CITY OF BODE, HUMBOLDT
COUNTY, IOWA.
A copy of the complete description
is available at the City Clerk’s office.
Notice is further hereby given that a
Public Hearing will be conducted at a
meeting of the City Council of the City
of Bode, Iowa, to be held on the 3rd day
of December, 2012, at 5 o’clock p.m.,
in the council chambers in the City Hall
in the City of Bode, Iowa, and that after
such Public Hearing has been concluded,
the City Council of Bode, Iowa, will act
upon said proposal.
A motion was made by Fulwider,
seconded by Thilges, to donate $100 to
Humboldt County for the new holding
facility for dogs and cats. All ayes, mo-
tion carried.
City legal representative was dis-
cussed; Mayor Rongved will explore
these options for the next council meet-
ing.
The speed of traffic on Rossing Ave.
was discussed; the placing of a speed
sign will be brought to the Humboldt
County Sheriff’s office.
The following bills were examined
and approved for payment:
Bills
Monthly Gross Wages .............$7,750.29
IPERS ...........................................840.44
FED and FICA ..........................1,208.49
Baker and Taylor books .................45.36
Abens-Marty-Curran Insurance .......4.00
Century Link Phone .....................207.37
City of Spencer landfill fees .........255.27
Mangold Environmental ................37.00
MidAmerican Energy ................1,195.45
Baker and Taylor books .................58.73
Bennett Recycling .....................1,125.00
Brown Supply culvert ..................215.59
Carquest Auto Parts ......................174.79
Central IA Distributing ................213.00
Century Link ................................206.91
City of Spencer landfill ................259.22
Data Tech summit fee/support ..1,066.00
Hach Company .............................105.25
Hawkins, Inc., Azone 15 ..............559.58
Humboldt Independent .................161.50
West IA Bank Loan on Water
Tower ...................................6,738.45
Jeff Omann, mileage ....................404.85
Mangold Environmental ..............729.00
Nationwide Environ .....................130.26
Marso Excavating Company .....2,355.54
Norm’s General Fuel ....................297.13
MidAmerican Energy ................1,138.62
NW IA League of Cities ................30.00
VS Enterprises internet ................126.05
Shoppers Supply seed/samples ......80.63
Airgas North Central rent ...............12.45
The meeting adjourned at 5:35 p.m.
Becky Struthers, City Clerk
I-27-1
With the holidays fast ap-
proaching, it is important to
remember those in need, es-
pecially hospital patients in
need of blood. During the
holidays, the need for blood
is constant and often times it
becomes difficult for donors to
find the time to make a blood
donation. Poor winter weather
conditions and busy schedules
all lead to a decrease in blood
donations and often times
Help prevent a blood shortage
during the holidays
causes a shortage in the blood
supply. Blood donors can help
prevent a blood shortage dur-
ing the holidays by making an
appointment to donate.
Please plan to give your
life-saving gift at the next
Humboldt Community Blood
Drive. The blood drive will
take place on Monday, Dec.
3, from 12:15-6 p.m., at Zion
Lutheran Church, 1005 11
th
Avenue North.
For more information or to
schedule an appointment to
donate, please contact Life-
Serve Blood Center at 800-
287-4903 or visit www.life-
servebloodcenter.org.
LIVERMORE NEWS
Anyone having news items
from the Livermore area may
contact Kirk Hundertmark,
379-2327.
LET US KNOW!
We are the Welcome to Humboldt/Dakota City
sponsors and we’ve got FREE
GIFTS from many of the area
merchants for newcomers to
Humboldt and Dakota City.
We are the Welcome to Humboldt/Dakota City
sponsors and we’ve got FREE
GIFTS from many of the area
merchants for newcomers to
Humboldt and Dakota City.
512 Sumner Avenue
P.O. Box 157
515.332.2514
www.humboldtnews.com
The Humboldt
Independent Newspaper
515-332-2514
12B The Humboldt Independent Thursday, November 22, 2012
Sharon Miller of Bank Iowa hands a cup of hot chocolate to Amaris Runia prior
to the Humboldt-Dakota City Chamber of Commerce Lighted Holiday Parade Sat-
urday night. At left is Sandra Mennen of Bank Iowa. See more photos from the pa-
rade at www.humboldtnews.com.
Girl Scouts are pic-
tured on a float during the
Humboldt-Dakota City
Chamber of Commerce
Lighted Holiday Parade on
Saturday night. See more
photos from the parade at
www.humboldtnews.com.
Hot chocolate served at parade
ISU Extension Horticul-
ture will present the workshop
“From Table to Garden- Re-
cycled Art for the Backyard”
to be held in the local Region 7
county extension offices. Par-
ticipants will learn to recycle
old, mismatched, or chipped
china into unique garden gifts
for Christmas! Shop second-
hand stores, garage sales, or
look in grandma’s cupboard
for dishes to use for these proj-
ects. Cost: $5, pre-register by
noon day of program.
Participants will create one
or both fun projects:
Mosaic Garden Stone: At-
tendees bring plates to break
(flat pieces work best); a
smooth, clean rock with a fair-
ly flat side (or a brick). Option-
al: May bring embellishments
(gemstones, flat marbles, old
jewelry, etc.) to use.
Garden Tower: Bring
plates of various graduated
sizes; heavy pot for base, short
vases, cups, etc. of suitable
height to separate plates.
Dishes must be china or
glass, bring extras to share or
trade. The same program will
be given in each county on the
following dates:
Humboldt: Tuesday, Nov.
27, 6:30 – 8 p.m., Humboldt
Co. ISU Extension Office, 727
Sumner, (515) 332-2201
Fort Dodge: Thursday,
Nov. 29, 6:30 – 8 p.m., Web-
ster Co. ISU Extension Office,
217 S. 25
th
Street, (515) 576-
2119
Clarion: Tuesday, Dec.
4, 6:30 – 8 p.m., Wright Co.
ISU Extension Office, 210 1
st
Street SW, (515) 532-3453
Webster City: Thursday,
Dec. 6, 6:30 – 8 p.m., Hamil-
ton Co. ISU Extension Office,
311 Bank Street, (515) 832-
9597
To register, call your local
ISU Extension Office for fur-
ther details!
Recycled
Garden Art
Workshops
offered
Although 92 percent of Iowa
motorists are using safety belts
during the daytime hours, there
are plenty of those who aren’t
especially in the rural com-
munities. Most of the state’s
police officers, deputy sher-
iffs, state troopers and DOT
officers will participate in the
Thanksgiving holiday effort
urging everyone to buckle up.
This one-week enhanced en-
forcement period, now through
Nov. 25, represents another
wave of Iowa’s special Traffic
Enforcement Program (sTEP).
The program joins public in-
formation efforts with those
of the local enforcement com-
munities geared at convincing
all motorists of the importance
of buckling up. In addition to
safety belt violations, officers
will also pay close attention
to impaired drivers and other
moving violations.
As of Nov. 1, with over 37
percent of this year’s 299 fatal-
ities having been determined
not to have been wearing seat
belts, the answer is clear that
buckling up increases your
odds in surviving a major
crash.
During the last August-
September sTEP wave, Iowa
officers confronted 2,358 seat
belt violations, 847 impaired
drivers, 13,443 speeding vio-
lations, and a total of over
34,335 contacts with traffic
violators. Vehicle assistance
was given to 1,980 motorists
and 419 arrest warrants were
served. The next sTEP wave
is scheduled for March 14-17,
2013.
sTEP up enforced this
Thanksgiving holiday
Prices include Shimkat discount and Chrysler Midwest Business Center
Rebates. Tax and license fees not included. Lease: 36 months, 10,000 miles
per year, 10% of MSRP downpayment, tax and license fees not included.
LAST OF THE NEW 2012’s!
Shim at
www.shimkat.com
a
t
t
h
e
t
o
p
o f t h e F o r t D o d g e A u t o M
i l e
FIVE STAR
3126 5th Avenue South, Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501
515-573-7164 toll free 1-888-694-8745
k
k
#####
We service all makes
& models. Service
Department open
‘til noon on
Saturday!
WINTER HOURS:
Sales:
Mon. thru Thurs. 8AM-7PM
Friday 8AM-6PM
Saturday 8AM-4PM
www.shimkat.com FOR OUR COMPLETE INVENTORY www.shimkat.com
2012 Chrysler 200 Limited 4 Door, Leather, Sunroof, Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,630
2012 Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4WD RamBox Cargo, Chrome Pkg., Tow Pkg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,800
2012 Jeep Liberty Latitude 4WD Chrome Wheels, Heated Leather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,615
2012 Dodge Charger SXT 4 Door, Chrome Wheels, Heated Leather, Sunroof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,290
2012 Ram Crew Cab 4WD HEMI, Chrome Wheels, Laramie, Leather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $40,230
In cooperation with the
COATS
4
Kids
BRING YOUR NEW OR GOOD USED COATS, BOOTS, GLOVES,
HATS, SNOWPANTS AND CLOTHING TO SHIMKAT MOTORS.
LET’S FILL THE VEHICLES IN OUR
SHOWROOM AND SHOW THE KIDS WE CARE.
Make this Christmas Make this Christmas Make this Christmas
warm & bright for a deserving young person! warm & bright for a deserving young person! warm & bright for a deserving young person!
2013 DODGE DART
SXT 4 DR.
$20,580
Aluminum Wheels, Satellite Radio, Full Power,
6 Speed Automatic Transmission
All New —
2013 Chrysler 200
Limited 4 Door
3.6 liter Flex Fuel V6, Heated Leather, Remote Start, Loaded
$
199
00
Lease for
per Month!!
2013 Chrysler
Town & Country Touring
3.6 liter Flex Fuel V6, Leather Interior,
Rear DVD Entertainment System, UConnect Hands Free Communication
$
287
00
Lease for
per Month!!
2013 Jeep Wrangler
Unlimited 4WD
Sport Package, Three-Piece Hardtop, 3.6 Liter V6, Full Power
$
31,645
2013 Chrysler 300 4 dr.
All Wheel Drive
3.6 liter Flex Fuel V6, Heated Leather, Touchscreen Navigation, Loaded!
2013 Dodge Durango
SXT 4WD
7 Passenger Seating, Rear Air & Heat, Automatic Temp. Control,
Full Power, UConnect Hands Free Communication
2013 Jeep Grand
Cherokee Laredo 4WD
Quadra-Trac 4WD, Satellite Radio, 3.6 Liter V6, Full Power
stk 19656
stk 19656 stk 19646 stk 19741
$
30,920
$
30,730
$
33,785
stk 19730 stk 19649
stk 19717